Thumbs up for OUTEX ! (tubeless conversion kit) - BMW NineT Forum
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post #1 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
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Thumbs up for OUTEX ! (tubeless conversion kit)

Itís been 10 days since the conversion using the Outex-Kit. No complaints so far. No pressure drop.

See album for photos: BMW NineT Forum - huntsman's Album: Tubeless Conversion

Trying to take the tire off myself on SuperCheapTireChange table wasnít the success Iíd hoped for. Even though I cracked the bead all around on both sides Ė still the tire didnít budge, the bead just didnít want to slip over the rim. Took it to my friendly bike mechanic. They make it look so easy, no? Luckily, when putting the tire back on he mentioned how tuff/tight it was ... uh, good news for me ... at least not as weak a weakling as I had been telling myself.

So, thanks goes to some of you guys who mentioned their experiences good & bad, helped a bit with looking out for tricky bits. However, no real pity here for people complaining they donít have the right tools or set-up to make sure the tape runs off the roll in a straight line. Two left hands & ten thumbs? Rushing it a bit? Is that you? Well, donít blame Outex. Look at my tools, the grinder with flap-wheel is basically the most high tech tool I used. Closer inspection of the rubber liner (between rim/spoke heads & tube) showed it already had cuts & tears from the sharp edged spoke heads. Itís about 3mm (1/8Ē) thick and solid Ė where the Outex instructions recommended sanding down the heads ... they really meant it. Reinforced adhesive dots to provide additional wear reduction between spoke heads & double-sided-sticky-tape is a good idea (comes with the kit).

A little thought and care is needed for wheel/rim placement when putting on the sticky tape & top strip. I used a Black & Decker hobby work bench, jaws open wide enough for front rim, and rear rim sits nicely across the opening. You donít want to have the rim doing its own thing or start rolling away ...

Very important: After sticky tape is put on (mustnít forget the stickers on the spoke heads!), a screwdriver-handle is enormously helpful to mould the tape into the curve and ensure positive contact for the adhesive. Same procedure again after the top-tape has been installed.

Pumping the tire up to 3 bar o/night (only slightly more than manualís recommended 36.3 PSI every day pressure) ĖWITHIN the HOUR Ė again assists positive contact and bonding of adhesive.

... bolt everything on again, reassemble ... test ride .... re-tighten (torque wrench) bolts ... and woooosh zoooom yaaaaay ......

(now I can go and find something worthwhile to spend my approx. $3500 savings on ... wireless tire pressure monitoring system? ...)


P.S.: Someone asked if our's has 'floating brake disk?' YES
P.P.S: the only specialist doohickey-tool I needed was a 22mm-in-hex-socket with 1/2" drive. Hard to get here ... shops must have just sold out when I got there. It'll be here in 2 weeks mate. Yeah right. Couldn't wait. WOULDN'T wait. An imperial bolt head (21.3mm) with a little weld added & sanded to perfect 22mm, welded onto a 1/2"hex socket did the trick for removal of BMW quick-change front axle. (see album)

I have a question for physicists and brainy people: According to Pascals Law, pressure is equal everywhere within a system (e.g. compressed air in a tire). Does that pressure (3 bar to take a round number) experience gravity? e.g: is 3 bar of pressure acting on an inner surface of a rotating wheel/rim - reduced by some factor as speed and centrifugal forces increase? Will the centrifugal force at some time/speed overcome the force of the 3 bar air pressure within the tire (not calculating the adhesive bond of the sticky tape) - and force the sealing tape to come off? What speed would that require?? (I hope the answer is nowhere near 230km/h ... or I'll have to rethink that fast-speed-slow-leak dilemma haha
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post #2 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 07:01 AM
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I think once the tape is on and has had the pressure on it for a bit, and cured, no centrifugal force will tear it back off even if the air pressure ceases to be on it, the adhesive is so strong. I also believe the weight of something plays a direct role in centrifugal force, and the tape weighs basically nothing.
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post #3 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 07:11 AM Thread Starter
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yeah I think so too, but sometimes I get crazy wonderings in my mind and wonder about physics and stuff. Then I wish I'd listened more in school, or at least knew where to look for such a formula .... or better, have someone explain it to me umpteen times because it sounds so good. Then I'll take my newfound knowledge to work and apply it liberally to shut up brown-nosers & wiseguys. ha!
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post #4 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 07:14 AM
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What is the advantage of taking the tube out - are you keeping the same tyre? I'm just wondering. Isn't having a tube as well another safeguard?

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post #5 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 07:39 AM Thread Starter
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... the point about removing the tube for me is the ease of puncture repair on the road. Motorbike touring has become our family's favourite way of holidaying. The journey is the destination. There's often 2 - 4 or 5 bikes in our group, keeping it all tubeless helps ... ... plus, I've already had all the equipment to fix punctures in tubeless tires (from previous bikes) and wasn't keen to drag along another set of tools to fix the only tubed bike - mine! Besides, every time the BMW club guys come over, or we ride with mates - there's hardly a bike among them with tubes anymore. Means my gear can help someone out too ... (just not another 'tubed' 9T ...)

Some guys on this forum talk about the vast difference of tire-deflation behaviour when punctured. I haven't experienced that myself ... can't comment on it.

Your question, running a tube as well .... uh ... see .... it would mean having to install two valves, which one should be filled - tube or tire? It's not really practical or useful. Our tires are modern 'tubeless' tires from factory - just installed on 'tubed' rims, so they are ok to keep (it says it on the tire-side-wall)

Really - it's mostly about personal preference & comfort in my case
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post #6 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by huntsman View Post
... the point about removing the tube for me is the ease of puncture repair on the road. Motorbike touring has become our family's favourite way of holidaying. The journey is the destination. There's often 2 - 4 or 5 bikes in our group, keeping it all tubeless helps ... ... plus, I've already had all the equipment to fix punctures in tubeless tires (from previous bikes) and wasn't keen to drag along another set of tools to fix the only tubed bike - mine! Besides, every time the BMW club guys come over, or we ride with mates - there's hardly a bike among them with tubes anymore. Means my gear can help someone out too ... (just not another 'tubed' 9T ...)

Some guys on this forum talk about the vast difference of tire-deflation behaviour when punctured. I haven't experienced that myself ... can't comment on it.

Your question, running a tube as well .... uh ... see .... it would mean having to install two valves, which one should be filled - tube or tire? It's not really practical or useful. Our tires are modern 'tubeless' tires from factory - just installed on 'tubed' rims, so they are ok to keep (it says it on the tire-side-wall)

Really - it's mostly about personal preference & comfort in my case
Fantastic job! Thank you for posting.
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post #7 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 08:56 AM
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Some guys on this forum talk about the vast difference of tire-deflation behaviour when punctured. I haven't experienced that myself ... can't comment on it.
I think that's a myth that's perpetuated by a bunch of people on the internet who don't know what they're talking about. Back in the day, sure - the tube was probably the only thing holding the air in the tire and if it blew, there goes your air, fast. It's just not the case anymore. Tubed BMW wheels still use a tubeless bead on the tire, which seals and holds - unlike the old style tubed wheels. The nipples are also very well sealed. Catastrophic blow-outs are about as likely on either style of tire. The "Tubes aren't safe!" argument just doesn't hold up anymore. Are they less convenient, in some cases yes - that all depends on the person and the scenario.

I personally don't mind the tubes, but I'm going to install the Outex kit for weigh savings and to lighten my tool kit up a little.

Just out of curiosity, how long did this take you? The grinding seems like it would suck up a day or two... I know others have skipped that step, but I imagine I'll take the time to do it when my kit arrives.
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post #8 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 02:33 PM
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Good to hear you also had success with Outex @huntsman

Only difference is that you did some grinding of the nipples, where I didn't. Looks a better seal with them grinded down.

Outex also recommend installing a tyre with pressure ASAP after the install to get the tape to bond. I think that this is a key step! I re-installed the tyre with air within an hour.
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post #9 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 02:37 PM
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(now i can go and find something worthwhile to spend my approx. $3500 savings on ... Wireless tire pressure monitoring system? ...)
:d
+3500
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post #10 of 140 Old 11-04-2014, 02:48 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Karamazov View Post
Just out of curiosity, how long did this take you? The grinding seems like it would suck up a day or two... I know others have skipped that step, but I imagine I'll take the time to do it when my kit arrives.
... good morning! Yawn, stretch ... just woke up, hm - coffee �� to kick-start my 2 brain cells ...
... ok, I did the rear wheel first - easier to remove (I thought) and was a bit prissy about it. Slowly and carefully grinding the heads - hardly touching. Say, about an hour for grinding, 30 minutes to blow the grinding dust of and wash/degrease it with methylated spirit. Near 2 hrs, incl. time to read instructions again, for installing outex kit.

by the 2nd wheel it went heaps faster. 1hr to read manual and get wheel out, after return from friendly neighbourhood bike mechanic -20 minutes for grinding (went about it industrial style ;-) and about 1 hour to install kit. No rushing there -no helping hands... and friendly bike mechanic lined up again to assist in prompt tire installation.

btw, we did the static balance thing. It really helped that I marked (white chalk) the valve position on the tires BEFORE tire removal. By lining the tires up again they turned out perfectly balanced as before the whole procedure. Friendly mechanic looked out for me and took extra care to line up the marks ....
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