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Tim - sounds good, and looks good too, though that's not a major driver for me either.

After an interesting comparison video by Austrian moto journalist - Motorradreifen where wolf compared 25 ADV tires in 5 groups - I learned enough to make a decision. Getting updated quotes for the Rocks this week, and hoping to have them on the bike asap. The stock Metzeler Tourance Next is useless on anything but asphalt, and I finally scrubbed the rear so much that I have to replace it, so both tires will go. Looking forward to that, and will report after I got them mounted and ridden the first 100 miles or so (in SE Florida summer heat - yuck!)
 

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Pic from this weekend's ride. Some expressway, lots of 2 lane rural US Routes, some gravel, a bit of dirt, and more grass. They did great on all surfaces, but hitting a gravel section of a rural road (pea sized gravel) at sixty miles an hour before realizing it was gravel led to a bit of a pucker moment. But it all worked out.

145815


Best,
-Tim
 
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I'm running the Continental TKC 70 on the front and a TKC 70 Rocks on the rear and am very happy with them so far. They're mounted on Scrambler wheels on my Pure.

View attachment 145801

So far I've ridden them quite a bit thru grassy fields (sometimes wet grassy fields, which were a nightmare with the stock tires) and on gravel and dirt roads. Nothing "serious offroad" but situations where the stock tires weren't as good. Also I like the way they look.

Just did a quick 250 mile trip over the weekend and they are remarkably smooth and quiet on the highway.

Best,
-Tim
I second that, I just returned after 5500km of very spirited riding in the Alps with my heavy GS (like, leaving-the-Duc’s-behind-riding…) this tire combo is outstanding. Still plenty of tire left, great traction on both tarmac and off-road!
 

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Great to hear fruther confirmation, Norbi, thanks. In Bikeontour.com, the Austrian moto-journalist who runs that site called the TKC70 Rocks combo something like a "70/40" combo, he liked them that much.

Now: who's riding your GS when you're home in TX? If it's garaged in or near München, do you need help exercising it a bit? For such a nice fellow forum member I'd free my calendar when over in Bavaria just to help you out ;)
 

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Great to hear fruther confirmation, Norbi, thanks. In Bikeontour.com, the Austrian moto-journalist who runs that site called the TKC70 Rocks combo something like a "70/40" combo, he liked them that much.

Now: who's riding your GS when you're home in TX? If it's garaged in or near München, do you need help exercising it a bit? For such a nice fellow forum member I'd free my calendar when over in Bavaria just to help you out ;)
@Parkblu you know what they say about Austrians here in Bavaria (“why is their flag 🇦🇹? So they can’t put it upside down”…), so no wonder… No, just kidding, I love Austria, just spent the past 3 weeks playing all over their gorgeous roads. I’m sure you’ve been there as well:

As to the rental suggestion, there’s also a saying that one should not rent out bikes or girlfriends. But we could go for a ride together sometime, for sure! Maybe next summer, I’ll be back. For sure it would be very interesting to exchange our lives’ experiences in our double-sworded worlds;-)
Now that I think about it, 70:40 doesn’t sound all that bad!
 

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@Parkblu you know what they say about Austrians here in Bavaria (“why is their flag 🇦🇹? So they can’t put it upside down”…), so no wonder… No, just kidding, I love Austria, just spent the past 3 weeks playing all over their gorgeous roads. I’m sure you’ve been there as well:

As to the rental suggestion, there’s also a saying that one should not rent out bikes or girlfriends. But we could go for a ride together sometime, for sure! Maybe next summer, I’ll be back. For sure it would be very interesting to exchange our lives’ experiences in our double-sworded worlds;-)
Now that I think about it, 70:40 doesn’t sound all that bad!
Thanks for the link, Norbi. Would love to watch it right now but it'll have to wait until this afternoon.

Now, in regards to that saying: sorry but you got it wrong ;) It refers to spouses and fountain pens!

Btw, I'll be heading over to my place outside Munich most likely in September or October. I have a late October appointment, and the small but super-friendly Kawasaki dealer Motocycler in Gräfelfing (south Munich) rents out bikes as long as the weather holds. BMWs I know, so I rented a lovely 900ZR (? - the "retro" model) from them last year and had a blast riding, even in the Voralpenland, the area between Munich and the Alps. I'd love to meet up with you sometime, and go riding of course!
 

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@Timmyjoe, I just ordered TKC 70 front and TKC 70 Rocks rear; hopefully have them mounted next week.

How many miles did you scrub them in?
 

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@Parkblu I think I've got 400 miles on them so far, not having a chance to ride much. Take it easy for the first fifty miles or so and you should be fine.

Best,
-Tim
 

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I'm a cautious rider and I'm not recommending going out and thrashing them until you get some miles on them, but I was riding them thru wet grass the day I got them mounted and they did fine.

I think, being fresh from the factory, they're pretty sticky. But again, break them in as you see fit.

Best,
-Tim
 

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I'm always willing and open to learn! What I read somewhere is that tires out of the mold are still coated with some substance that allows better and easier separation from the mold, and that's the reason to break tires in.

Good opportuntity to do some research to see if this is still true.

Ok, I'm back from Research ;-)

At https://www.continental-tires.com/c...fitting/changing-tires/braking-with-new-tires Conti writes:

Just like a new pair of shoes, new tires need to go through a breaking-in period before they can drive at their best [...]

What’s different about new tires?

There are a number of factors that will make your new tires perform a little differently to your older ones.

Lubricants. During manufacturing, a release lubricant is used to help remove tires from their molds. This substance remains on the tread until it wears off on the road. Before it has completely worn off, it could reduce your traction.

Antioxidants. These are applied to help keep the tire rubber from breaking down when exposed to environmental factors such as fluctuating temperatures and oxygen. They may make tires feel slick at first.

Tread depth. New tires will naturally feature maximum tread depth. This fresh tread is stiff, smooth, deep, and could feel like unyielding, thick cushioning between you and the road at first. This may lead to something called squirm.

[...]


For car tires, with a longevity of 4-6 times of motorcycle tires, Conti recommends approx. 500 mi. For motorcycle tires, I see anywhere from 50-100 mi, while motorbikewriter.com talks about 160-200km (100-130mi). BobsCycle at Break In Your New Motorcycle Tires summarises what most sites recommend:

The First 100 Miles

During the first 100 miles of your motorcycle tires' life, focus on breaking them in gradually. As mentioned before, a long-distance ride provides the perfect opportunity to warm up and break in your tires properly. During the break-in period, your tires will lose their glossy sheen as the curing chemicals and release agents are worn off.

If you're not able to get out on the highway, you can use an empty parking lot and take slow figure-8 motions on your bike to safely scrub in your tires. Using tire warmers can help speed up the break-in process, but these are not an accessory that every rider has access to.

Breaking in your new tires during the first 100 miles comes with some important dos and don'ts. Keep the following in mind:

  • Plan your break-in rides during warm weather. Riding in cold or rainy weather just means it'll take longer to properly break in your motorcycle tires. Riding on a warm spring or summer day helps your rubber get more grip sooner.
  • Forget about weaving around. Professional racers do this to retain heat in their pre-warmed tires, but it does little to help ordinary riders warm up their street rubber. Weaving simply puts you at greater risk of a lay-down.
  • Stick to cruising around during the break-in period. As tempted as you may be to go full throttle and get your knee down in corners, you should go easy throughout the break-in period.
  • Check your tire pressures regularly. Breaking in your tires at the wrong pressures can have adverse effects on long-term handling and performance. Keep a close eye on tire pressures and adjust them as needed.
Observing these tips can prevent you from taking a nasty tumble on slick, poorly-prepared tires.

Mile 101 and Beyond

Once you're past the 100-mile mark on your fresh, new tires, you'll be tempted to crack open the throttle and really put your tires to the test. But not so fast — a gradual break-in is still best for your tires. Start by putting your motorcycle through its paces gradually, pushing further as you build up more confidence in your tires' performance.

(Read on at Break In Your New Motorcycle Tires)
 

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Good stuff Tobias. One thing I did notice about the tires is when I first mounted them, I filled them to the recommended pressure, and after about a week, they were low by about 4-5 psi each. I was worried that they had not been mounted properly. But after I took them on a 250 mile mini-trip, they now don't lose any pressure. So I guess they also break in on how they mount and grip the rim.

Also, all my break in miles have been in this unseasonably hot/humid weather we've been having this summer, so I assume that has helped as well.

Best,
-Tim
 

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Thanks a lot for sharing that, Tim. I'd be a bit irritated too, not knowing what you learned. I suppose the tire needs to settle on the rim creating an airtight seal, which takes a few miles.
 

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Got them:
146618

146619

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TKC-70 Rocks rear, TKC-70 (normal) front. Rode her home very cautiously, but already noticed a very different feel compared to the Metzeler Tourance Next, and very easy to lean. I'll be cautious for the first 100 mi or so, and then will report down the road when I had them for 1k mi (1.6k km) or more.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Tread Wheel Tire Plant Automotive tire Vehicle Tire Wheel Land vehicle Automotive fuel system Vehicle
 

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Quick Report: TKC-70 / TKC-70 Rocks Combo in the dirt.

Summary: OMG ;)

Yesterday morning I went over to an unpaved boat ramp area on the Eastern end of the Everglades. Lots of folks trailer their boats here, including flat-bottom "propeller boats", to go fishing in the 'Glades. After a few days of good rain there was enough mud, wet silt and standing puddles to try the TKC-70s out at least a little bit – limited by my utter lack of riding skills.

What I did: turn Traction Control off, place the bike in a big puddle, on mud or wet silt, and go for it. The other thing I tried: head up a small incline of about 7 feet / 2 m height from one to another unpaved track, the incline mostly covered with coarse gravel or with grass and sand. (link to sat map: in Parkland, FL - Parkland, Florida - MapQuest if you want to look it up)

Result: these tires are astonishing, at least for me who hasn't done much off-road riding in eons. Standing in mud and opening the throttle a good bit, the rear just took half a blink of an eye until it found traction and then shot forward with just the slightest wiggle – over and over again, without breaking out or even sliding, as my Metzeler Tourance Next did (90/10? 10% of what?).

On coarse gravel going "up the hill", the tires gained traction immediately every time and went up the incline without hesitation, to a point where one time I was so fast that I nearly overshot the path on top. – That would have meant going down an embankment and into the ditch. Oops.

I rode around for a good hour, then stopped somewhat out of breath, with water squishing in my boots, me pretty much soaked, dirt splatters even on my glasses, overall quite muddy but grinning like the Cheshire Cat.

It was incredible fun and a real kick to be able to repeatedly probing these tires for their limits – which very clearly exceed my own by a massive amount. I need dirt-riding training badly, witnessed by the fact that I nearly dropped the bike three times. Thankfully only nearly - I kept her upright and I didn't have to wrestle uprighting 225 kg/490 lbs in the mud. Yuck.

Tires: Highly Recommended.

Sky Tire Wheel Plant Vehicle

Tire Cloud Wheel Sky Plant

Tire Wheel Water Plant Motorcycle
 

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Yep . . . (y)(y)(y)

Best,
-Tim
 

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Sunday I was able to cake more mud on my bike ;) Then the devil got into me and I attacked a sandy two-lane track between two canals in the Everglades. That had quite the pucker factor - loose sand is not something I know how to handle (yet?). I read I'm supposed to "float" the tires over sand, but with murky ditches on both sides I did not have the nerve to speed up. But I made it.

Did I mention I need off-road training? No? :LOL:
 

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Sunday I was able to cake more mud on my bike ;) Then the devil got into me and I attacked a sandy two-lane track between two canals in the Everglades. That had quite the pucker factor - loose sand is not something I know how to handle (yet?). I read I'm supposed to "float" the tires over sand, but with murky ditches on both sides I did not have the nerve to speed up. But I made it.

Did I mention I need off-road training? No?
They look sweet, glad they ride great too. I swapped to TKC70's just before they released the Rock version. Going to give them a try when my rear wears out, which is going to be awhile, they last forever.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 
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