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You can establish if the rear wheel is centred, or dished as it's called if you where building a spoked pushbike wheel by comparing it with a stock cast wheel (assuming they are correct) Simply take a straight edge and place it on the disc mounting surface and measure to the centre of the wheel rim, this should be the same despite rim width.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
You can establish if the rear wheel is centred, or dished as it's called if you where building a spoked pushbike wheel by comparing it with a stock cast wheel (assuming they are correct) Simply take a straight edge and place it on the disc mounting surface and measure to the centre of the wheel rim, this should be the same despite rim width.
I really measured carefully the difference between front and rear wheels and I confirm that wheels are not aligned by 7mm (1/4 inch)
It is also confirmed by the dimension called rim-offset center which is not the expected value for a 6inches rim.
Moreover, it has been confirmed by phone by ACSchnitzer guy, who said yes it is not aligned but it does matter :(
 

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I really measured carefully the difference between front and rear wheels and I confirm that wheels are not aligned by 7mm (1/4 inch)
It is also confirmed by the dimension called rim-offset center which is not the expected value for a 6inches rim.
Moreover, it has been confirmed by phone by ACSchnitzer guy, who said yes it is not aligned but it does matter :(
With the stock muffler, I had to return to a 180 tire as the 190 was too close (less than 2 mm clearance) For sure impossible to mount a 200mm. It is a pity as 6 inches rim is normally made for 190 ...
 

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You can establish if the rear wheel is centred, or dished as it's called if you where building a spoked pushbike wheel by comparing it with a stock cast wheel (assuming they are correct) Simply take a straight edge and place it on the disc mounting surface and measure to the centre of the wheel rim, this should be the same despite rim width.
Nobody is wondering IF the wheel is centered, he’s wondering WHY/HOW it’s not centered And how to fix it.

maybe they sent you a Euro 4 wheel by mistake?
 

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Hmmm, interesting.

@Frank13 .......You have stated that AC have confirmed this 7mm offset increase to the lefthand/offside (only) is intentional, and furthermore, that TUV have certified this misalignment. I find this staggering (no pun intended)!!

FYI, here in the UK, wheel alignment is checked as part of the yearly MOT test, and if the wheels are not running on the same centreline then that is a reason for failure of the test.......so in short, the supposedly 'intentional' misalignment would make them illegal for use on UK roads.

Handling wise, having a rear wheel more to the left than the front wheel would make the bike want to overly steer into right hand turns, and want to resist turning into left handers. Obviously this situation would be very unpredictable, and highly dangerous. Your comment about the bike wanting to veer to the right when you let go of the bars would also be a trait of the misalignment you describe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
For sure there is difference at front with ABS ring. But to my knowledge, there is no difference between euro 3 and euro 4 for the rear wheel.
But if it is the case, it could explain my issue...
Is there somewhere a nineT owner who could really measure his AC wheels alignment ?
 

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Euro 3/4 wheels have the same final drive and are dished the same as one another.. Only difference wheel measurement wise is that the ABS ring is a different diameter on the front wheel as has already been stated.

Measuring front to rear wheel alignment isn't very accurate as frames always have a degree of tolerance and 7mm would be considered acceptable.

The only way to measure wheel dish is as previously described, however if AC have already confirmed this then there's not much point in further investigation.

I wonder if cast/carbon/spoked wheels with 6' rims from other manufactures have the same issue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
For sure it is not a default of my frame as the stock wheels were fully aligned.
I did the measure three times whit great care.
At beginning, It was the clearance with stock muffler close to zero with the AC wheels mounted 190 And the alignment with the numberplate that alert me.:unsure:
 

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Measuring front to rear wheel alignment isn't very accurate as frames always have a degree of tolerance and 7mm would be considered acceptable.
Actually, measuring front to rear wheel alignment IS VERY accurate. It is the wheel alignment that is being checked in this instance, NOT the frame alignment.

May I ask where you get your information that 7mm misalignment is acceptable please?
 

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Actually, measuring front to rear wheel alignment IS VERY accurate. It is the wheel alignment that is being checked in this instance, NOT the frame alignment.

May I ask where you get your information that 7mm misalignment is acceptable please?
Capitals and bold eh.. Well in my opinion, and it's only my opinion wheel dish is correct or it is not correct, so if we where to say that the frame was out of line 7mm to the left, and the rear wheel 7mm out to the right, the wheels may be inline but would that be correct? Two wrongs make a right in your opinion then?

Most production bikes/frames/chassis are not perfect, and remember if front and rear wheels are 7mm out of line it only takes 3.5 mm correction to establish centre.

Then on a bike with a chain you have to take into account rear wheel/chain adjustment, you could make the wheels line up by making adjustment but then the sprockets may be out of line.
 

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Nothing at all. They said that 7mm was acceptable for them :oops:
That’s not cool at all. That offset won’t affect my exhaust, but that’s not something I would want....

Man...I really like the look of those wheels but that’s just not acceptable....
 

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I remember from a workshop manual of the 1150 boxers that the tolerance on the wheel alignment offset is on the order of 9mm. It surprised me even then. But this may explain why the manufacturer says 7mm is acceptable
 

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I remember from a workshop manual of the 1150 boxers that the tolerance on the wheel alignment offset is on the order of 9mm. It surprised me even then. But this may explain why the manufacturer says 7mm is acceptable
just odd that it was 0 mm with the stock wheels and 7 mm with aftermarket....that definitely doesn’t seem right.
 

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Anyone felt the bike behave differently vs stock?
because mine didn’t at Barber Motorsport Park. 🤣🤣🤣🤣.
No seriously, there are guys out there running waterpipe exhaust, get praised and you guys over here “feel” the difference the offset made and “unacceptable”
 

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@Frank13 I've recently received some similar wheels from PVM (who I believe manufacture the AC Schnitzer wheels) and have encountered the same problem. I've been holding off on typing this out until I got a resolution but if this stops someone from getting into a similar situation it's probably worthwhile.

The wheels I have are the PVM 5Y, so a different wheel but same offset issue. When ordering I was tossing up between the standard 5.5" vs 6" wheel. I too was concerned around alignment/offset/fitment, and actually got PVM to confirm in writing (via my local reseller) that both sizes were guaranteed OEM fitment before ordering. With that guarantee I figured why not get something a little special and go for the 6" wheel. After a few months of lead-time I got the wheels, and then had to wait a few more months to get some tyres fitted (due to prolonged Covid lockdown here in Melbourne).

Lo and behold the wheels just don't fit. Same as Frank, it looks as though all of the extra width of the wheel was just added to the left hand side. This results in the wheel not being centred as well as being unable to mount the exhaust with the standard bracket. The clearance between the swingarm and the right hand side of the wheel is similar to stock- looking at the space I'm unsure how any 6" wheel would fit (especially with a 190 tyre!) but I've heard of quite a few folks doing so from a number of wheel manufacturers. Same as Frank, my stock wheels line up perfectly and I've torn my hair out with measurements ruling out chassis misalignment etc. I even had a chat to the guys at Daedalus as they sell these wheels specifically for the R Nine T and they were very helpful and informative, especially since I hadn't purchased the wheels through them. They'd never heard of similar fitment issues and even took the time out to mount one of their 6" wheels that they had in the shop and take some measurements and everything came back consistent between their wheels and mine.

All we could think of was that all other owners who purchased a 6" wheel used either a high-mount or short stubby GP-style exhaust and therefore wouldn't run into any clearance issues and simply didn't notice the difference in offset. Now that I know it's there I notice it as soon as I look at the bike, but I think it would be easy to overlook.

I don't have a resolution yet, and am waiting to for PVM to get back to me. I'm hopeful that we can come to a fair resolution. If I knew about the 6" fitment issues I'd have simply elected for the 5.5" wheel. I'm not meaning this to be a cautionary tale to avoid PVM or AC Schnitzer- their products are of great quality, but I'd recommend getting the stock 5.5" size rather than the 6" size, that is unless you're planning on running a high-mount or stubby exhaust and aren't bothered by the offset difference.
 
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