BMW NineT Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone,

I have been reading a bit here and there on the forum about the R nine t / urban g/s.
This is my first bike with an oil/air cooled engine (U/gs '18).. and read in some places that running the bike hot can cause damage etc.
The most i have gotten on my digital temperature was about 113c at the traffic lights when it was 25c outside. Of course.. the lower the engine temperature the better it is for the engine and the oil?

I do wonder.. would adding a small fan help in pulling away heat from the radiator/engine at the R nine t, specially at standstill?
Or is a big part of the cooling also provided by the engine fins on the side?

I would be up for fabricating some kind of oil guard with a built in fan that can be switched on/off by a temperature reader.
For example; if the bike exeeds 100c.. it kicks on.. I would just fit the fan inbetween the radiator guard and the actual radiator by using standoffs..

Just brainstorming here.. ;)

Example;

 

·
Registered
2016 RNineT Classic
Joined
·
111 Posts
Chris, you’re riding in the Netherlands. Just trust the German engineers on that. Those engines have been tested all over the place, worldwide, for decades, in all circumstances, even in places like Death Valley, Dakar etc. There is NO WAY you can ever exceed critical temperatures, especially not in the Netherlands. Unless you rev it in your garage at standstill for quite a long time, but you’re not planning to do that, are you? And even then...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I've had my engine temp pegged at 285ºF multiple times because of gridlocked traffic (downtown seattle), I'm up at 17k miles now with no issues.

Air cooled engines are designed to withstand big temp changes, unlike newer water cooled engines that freak out if you look at them wrong (looking at you KTM). If you are going to be stuck in hot weather gridlock traffic, just shut the engine off until it's time to move. It's much more relaxing that way.

If you are really concerned, don't buy an air cooled bike. Doesn't make sense (to me) to spend thousands of dollars on something you don't trust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've had my engine temp pegged at 285ºF multiple times because of gridlocked traffic (downtown seattle), I'm up at 17k miles now with no issues.

Air cooled engines are designed to withstand big temp changes, unlike newer water cooled engines that freak out if you look at them wrong (looking at you KTM). If you are going to be stuck in hot weather gridlock traffic, just shut the engine off until it's time to move. It's much more relaxing that way.

If you are really concerned, don't buy an air cooled bike. Doesn't make sense (to me) to spend thousands of dollars on something you don't trust.
Thanks for the reply, i was just curious about the temps and it being ok.. i do 100% trust the BMW engineers and the bike ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Remember that the temp gauge measures the oil in this engine, while most other bikes it's measured in the coolant.
The engine doesn't get as hot as you think it does. I learnt to not look at the temp gauge, and it goes up pretty high in Australia!
 

·
Registered
2017 R nineT Classic
Joined
·
408 Posts
Our bikes also measure the oil temp as it flows through the engine and not in the sump where people are used to seeing it as well. So that is another reason for a higher than expected reading. Also of note is there is a range where the engine is fine to operate but for some reason the gauge stops updating the temp displayed. Once the temp reaches or exceeds 289F/143C thegauge won’t update until it drops below that temp. Riders have often confused this behavior with overheating but the temp warning Light isn’t activated at this temp.

In summary the gauge likely reads higher than expected for various reasons. Don’t sweat it unless you can’t really get moving or are stuck.
 

·
Registered
BMW R nineT Pure
Joined
·
109 Posts
When I started considering whether to buy an air/oil-cooled boxer twin, I wondered about overheating while sitting in traffic, especially on a hot summer day. But I've done enough research to see it's just not an issue. I only bought my new Pure a couple weekends ago, so I won't encounter hot temperatures until next summer, but when it happens I'll try not to sweat it too much. As others have said, if you get too worried you can always switch off the bike for a few minutes.

One other thought here: One big reason I bought my R9T Pure was it's simplicity. Just my opinion, but adding a cooling fan or radiator of some kind would ruin the appeal of the simpler machine to me. But it's your bike, and if you ever did a mod like this it would be interesting to see what difference it made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Consider the case of the oil cooled GSXR, Suzuki engineers were cool (😃) with the results.

Are there any automotive/moto oil coolers with fans?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Oil is quite happy up to far hotter temperatures than coolant. In my vehicle testing days, we would try to keep synthetics below 200C (350F I believe was our target), but a quick trip up to 250C wasn't out of the question in the most extreme circumstances (towing past max rated capacity, uphill, in Death Valley in the middle of summer).

It's actually possible to OVERCOOL oil - when it gets hot, all the moisture and combustion byproducts that seep past the rings burn off. If your oil never gets hot for an extended period of time, this collects and is quite bad for your engine. Hence the time requirement for oil change intervals as well as mileage!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top