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I think it's smart for folks like @Juice to realize when a bike isn't right for them. It's certainly possible to mod a bike more to your liking, as most of us R9T owners have done. But when the machine just isn't right for them, and it would take big money to attempt to make it right - if it can even be done - it's probably better to just move on to another motorcycle entirely. Better that than spending a lot of time and money trying to fix it, then maybe still being unhappy with the end result.

I second-guessed myself a few times after buying my R9T about 13 months ago. Even this spring and early summer I was still wondering if I bought the right bike. I think it's worth more than I owe on it, so if necessary I could get out it without losing my shirt. But after finally doing the suspension mods in July I'm very happy with this machine, and plan on keeping it long-term. It's still not perfect, but I can't think of a bike I'd rather have at this point.

One other thing I'd say to Juice: If you like the boxer twin engine but are unhappy with the R9T's handling compared to the V-twin sportbikes, you might try riding an R1200S (an older bike), or an R1200RS (or the newer 1250 version). Both will have more forward lean and closer to 50/50 weight distribution. The "S" has a much sportier riding position than most BMWs, except for the S1000RR and HP bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
It is indeed a moto that requires domination, you must overwhelm it with determined commands, no doubt about that .. Please read some threads on sellers remorse … and prepare for quality issues you didn’t have with your boxer. Just the obligatory fair warning … StayUpOn 2 … BeWell ……Blitz
Bard In Residence. Quality? Some better some worse. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
:unsure: How different all we feel riding bikes!!!!

In my case, after 14 years riding a Monster from 2003 that I never got used to it...In the other hand, suddenly, since first day I rode my ninet Pure, it was very easy and natural. It Looks like BMW made Ninet Pure for me. Since first day I felt Ninet as my bike I have been riding all my life...

I was thinking about this some time.I was very surprised. I guess why?. I think main problem I felt with my old Monster was ergonomics/handlebar...These kind of bikes don´t fit properly to me because I can´t hold handlebar without pressure...I get tired quickly and slowly my body position press handlebar and In this situation make countersteering is not natural nor easy... Ninet Racer is the same problem for me for this reason. With Ninet Pure I discovered I ride using mainly rear tire? The balance/weight is on the rear...Front is lighter contersteering

Probably you are in the opposite side. Probably you get on like house on fire with these ergonomics??? Try Ninet Racer.
You bring up a good point. Common to compare ones present ride to what they have been used to riding.
 

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Bard In Residence. Quality? Some better some worse. Thanks.
Show me better for the same money Juice, statistics, history, longevity, proof not bias and I’ll buy into it … for the same $$$ cost. Read about dependability in 2nd WW history alone. My wish in owning a moto is primarily that it starts and runs every time I push the switch or jump the kick starter so no matter how far from home I am she get me back. BMW wins hands-down ! All the rest is just bravado and chrome. ..for my money BMW is the apex of production motorcycles that understand the term “never-die” … over the past 50 years I’ve been to dozens of international gatherings of Beemers with an excess of 1M miles on them, with side cars and trailers and loads of gear … maintenance is a minor consideration where with other machines it’s a critical ordeal … sorry Juice but I’m sold on Bavaria’s genius.
……Blitz
 

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FWIW, a fresh set of Dunlop Q3s completely transformed the RnineT Racer. I had no confidence in corners on the stock tires - they felt vague and floaty, and seemed to resist inputs, similar I think to what you are describing. The difference was immediate on the Q3s, so much more confidence inspiring and I no longer have to wrestle with it to change direction.
I'm skeptical of the moment of inertia argument - steering geometry/rake/trail, tires, suspension, and handle bars will all have much greater impact on 'flickability' than how far your head pokes out ;)

If the bike is still near and dear, I'd recommend trying some different rubbers. If not, there's no shame in moving on to something that excites you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I think it's smart for folks like @Juice to realize when a bike isn't right for them. It's certainly possible to mod a bike more to your liking, as most of us R9T owners have done. But when the machine just isn't right for them, and it would take big money to attempt to make it right - if it can even be done - it's probably better to just move on to another motorcycle entirely. Better that than spending a lot of time and money trying to fix it, then maybe still being unhappy with the end result.

I second-guessed myself a few times after buying my R9T about 13 months ago. Even this spring and early summer I was still wondering if I bought the right bike. I think it's worth more than I owe on it, so if necessary I could get out it without losing my shirt. But after finally doing the suspension mods in July I'm very happy with this machine, and plan on keeping it long-term. It's still not perfect, but I can't think of a bike I'd rather have at this point.

One other thing I'd say to Juice: If you like the boxer twin engine but are unhappy with the R9T's handling compared to the V-twin sportbikes, you might try riding an R1200S (an older bike), or an R1200RS (or the newer 1250 version). Both will have more forward lean and closer to 50/50 weight distribution. The "S" has a much sportier riding position than most BMWs, except for the S1000RR and HP bikes.
I will look into those also. Thanks TC
Show me better for the same money Juice, statistics, history, longevity, proof not bias and I’ll buy into it … for the same $$$ cost. Read about dependability in 2nd WW history alone. My wish in owning a moto is primarily that it starts and runs every time I push the switch or jump the kick starter so no matter how far from home I am she get me back. BMW wins hands-down ! All the rest is just bravado and chrome. ..for my money BMW is the apex of production motorcycles that understand the term “never-die” … over the past 50 years I’ve been to dozens of international gatherings of Beemers with an excess of 1M miles on them, with side cars and trailers and loads of gear … maintenance is a minor consideration where with other machines it’s a critical ordeal … sorry Juice but I’m sold on Bavaria’s genius.
……Blitz
No offense to you in my "Bard in Residence" Au contraire, a high kudo.
Boils down to what your preference is and what sings to you. I have been very happy with Japanese bikes. I never cared to own one longer than doing routine basic shade tree mainenance and tune ups. I was just reflecting back and I don't recall ever having one break down on me. Some 40+ years. Although I don't put mega miles on the bikes that I have owned. I have some friends with old Jap iron and when I ask about reliability I inevitable get "no problems", I will take that with a grain of salt. Want a bike for decades and want to put 100k miles on it....guess you would want a BMW, no argument.

Cheers
 

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I will look into those also. Thanks TC

No offense to you in my "Bard in Residence" Au contraire, a high kudo.
Boils down to what your preference is and what sings to you. I have been very happy with Japanese bikes. I never cared to own one longer than doing routine basic shade tree mainenance and tune ups. I was just reflecting back and I don't recall ever having one break down on me. Some 40+ years. Although I don't put mega miles on the bikes that I have owned. I have some friends with old Jap iron and when I ask about reliability I inevitable get "no problems", I will take that with a grain of salt. Want a bike for decades and want to put 100k miles on it....guess you would want a BMW, no argument.

Cheers
I see your point Juice, and yes I do want a machine that will live on long after I’m gone. I’ve never owned more than one bike at a time although they have overlapped occasionally (14 production bikes and 3 scratch built). When I was touring (to old now) I spent so much time maintaining the machine that now with my first BMW I realize how much time I waisted and what quality I had been missing. I won’t live much longer but I’ll never go back to mediocre design, inferior materials, poor craftsmanship and complete lack of quality control as I had from Spain, Italy, Japan and American motorcycles … “For Me” it’s day and night …. I’d always heard about boxers and always in a good way, I can’t believe it took me so long to go get one …. and as BMW goes ..one of the prettiest striking Classic looks out there, again my taste and requirements. As someone on here observed, sometimes a bike just “fits” and this R9T was made for me in every way. I will add Farkles here and there but all the rest is fine.
Regards Juice …. StayUpOn2 no matter the brand …..BeWell ……Blitz
 

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2019 BMW R nine T Scrambler
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I am not a sporty rider by any measure. I just got back on a bike for the first time in 25 years this April and it is my ‘19 R nine T scrambler. Most of the negatives you point out are positives to me. One of the things I appreciate most about it is how stable it is. It never surprises me in a bad way. It forgives me most of the time if I’m in the wrong gear. I feel very sure in turns but I also don’t mind slowing down to my comfort level for them.

it also fits me great ergonomically, so there’s that too.
 

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I spent this past weekend driving several Japanese V-twin engine sport bikes. I compared the handling characteristics to my `14 RNT. I am disappointed. I came off of a Harley and have had a dozen other motorcycles. All inline 4s or V-twins. To my addled and foggy memory I can state that I always felt that my previous bikes (except the hardtail chopper) all handled better than the RNT. I said to myself….self, “naah, can’t be” This weekend reinforced my correct memories.
I have only put on a couple thousand miles on the R9T in the last year. All of these miles have been solely on twisty roads. Never over 80mph. Sadly I have found that the BMW is awkward and needs firm coaxing to get that motor out of vertical and back to vertical. For a while I thought that it was just me . I thought that I just needed to get used to the handling characteristics of a boxer. Well I have it figured it out and can push it hard into and out of turns comfortably. For me there is markedly more effort required than there should be. Nature of the beast. I get it and thought that I could live with it. No matter the speed It does not match the look-lean and go cornering of V-Twins and to a lesser degree inline 4’s. I knew going into the purchase that this would be the case but was surprised as to the extent.
This weekend I drove four V-twins. Three 1000cc+ bikes and one 700cc bike on my roads. I reported the cornering on all four as “silky”. Simple physics reveals the truth again. In a turn the mass of those jugs hanging out in the wind on the RNTs short axis takes more energy to re-orientate their position relative to level as compared to V-twin.
Keeping as much mass as close to the COG is the key. Further away from COG the more energy required to change it’s position. Some racers used to keep the battery in the tail section. They found that getting that battery closer to the center of the bike improved handling markedly. And that mass is on the long axis
Mind you it’s all subjective analysis on my part. The majority here are happy with the handling, albeit some with suspension changes. In this issue suspension change would not do anything for the outboard mass transitions. There is much to like on the RNT, pains me to unload it. I’m not a multi-bike guy. Seems like when I had a few at the same time I always rode just one of them.
More than likely I will sell it for a V-2

Cheers.
Which twin did you decide on
 

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R9T isn't a sport bike, it's not a dirt bike, it's not a cruiser, it's a cafe bike. You can do any of the aforementioned activities, but my R9T will never keep up with my 350 xcfw. Kinda obvious.
 

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I spent this past weekend driving several Japanese V-twin engine sport bikes. I compared the handling characteristics to my `14 RNT. I am disappointed. I came off of a Harley and have had a dozen other motorcycles. All inline 4s or V-twins. To my addled and foggy memory I can state that I always felt that my previous bikes (except the hardtail chopper) all handled better than the RNT. I said to myself….self, “naah, can’t be” This weekend reinforced my correct memories.
I have only put on a couple thousand miles on the R9T in the last year. All of these miles have been solely on twisty roads. Never over 80mph. Sadly I have found that the BMW is awkward and needs firm coaxing to get that motor out of vertical and back to vertical. For a while I thought that it was just me . I thought that I just needed to get used to the handling characteristics of a boxer. Well I have it figured it out and can push it hard into and out of turns comfortably. For me there is markedly more effort required than there should be. Nature of the beast. I get it and thought that I could live with it. No matter the speed It does not match the look-lean and go cornering of V-Twins and to a lesser degree inline 4’s. I knew going into the purchase that this would be the case but was surprised as to the extent.
This weekend I drove four V-twins. Three 1000cc+ bikes and one 700cc bike on my roads. I reported the cornering on all four as “silky”. Simple physics reveals the truth again. In a turn the mass of those jugs hanging out in the wind on the RNTs short axis takes more energy to re-orientate their position relative to level as compared to V-twin.
Keeping as much mass as close to the COG is the key. Further away from COG the more energy required to change it’s position. Some racers used to keep the battery in the tail section. They found that getting that battery closer to the center of the bike improved handling markedly. And that mass is on the long axis
Mind you it’s all subjective analysis on my part. The majority here are happy with the handling, albeit some with suspension changes. In this issue suspension change would not do anything for the outboard mass transitions. There is much to like on the RNT, pains me to unload it. I’m not a multi-bike guy. Seems like when I had a few at the same time I always rode just one of them.
More than likely I will sell it for a V-2

Cheers.
Essentially, the problem is that no bike ticks all boxe(r)s.

R9Ts were designed to be an all-round practical roadster with huge mod-ability (but the donk is always there with its unique characteristics, as you note). Stock, they're middling machines in most areas (except style and character!)... Jack-Off-All-Trades with a quirky motor configuration which has survived for very good reasons : reliability, low CG, durability, character.

I love tracking my R9T/5 but it's always going to be a bus compared to my mates' RC390 or R6. It's plenty fast but a slug compared to a K13 or Z14. It's comfortable enough, but no sports-tourer.

I too am a one-bike man, mainly because I just don't have the spare time to justify two bikes. I would love a GS for weekends or a pocket-rocket for the track or an ST13 for trips away but every time I look at them I wouldn't swap them for my R9T/5 with its old-school Teutonic charm and that glorious warbling engine. I also love the way it handles as long as I don't try compare it to a sports bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I am not a sporty rider by any measure. I just got back on a bike for the first time in 25 years this April and it is my ‘19 R nine T scrambler. Most of the negatives you point out are positives to me. One of the things I appreciate most about it is how stable it is. It never surprises me in a bad way. It forgives me most of the time if I’m in the wrong gear. I feel very sure in turns but I also don’t mind slowing down to my comfort level for them.

it also fits me great ergonomically, so there’s that too.
Nice that you are dialed into your comfort zone...stay there, nice place to be. The singular negative I have regarding the RNT is the turn transitioning.....that's it. All the other boxes are checked off positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Which twin did you decide on
looking hard, trying to find something reasonably close. I'm throwing a wide net. I'd like to have a naked bike. Fairings don't do it for me. Jap iron only with the only exception being a Super Duke. TLs, SVs, RC 51s, Superhawks. I 'd like a liter displacement. Trying to stick to a twin. <9K$
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Essentially, the problem is that no bike ticks all boxe(r)s.

R9Ts were designed to be an all-round practical roadster with huge mod-ability (but the donk is always there with its unique characteristics, as you note). Stock, they're middling machines in most areas (except style and character!)... Jack-Off-All-Trades with a quirky motor configuration which has survived for very good reasons : reliability, low CG, durability, character.

I love tracking my R9T/5 but it's always going to be a bus compared to my mates' RC390 or R6. It's plenty fast but a slug compared to a K13 or Z14. It's comfortable enough, but no sports-tourer.

I too am a one-bike man, mainly because I just don't have the spare time to justify two bikes. I would love a GS for weekends or a pocket-rocket for the track or an ST13 for trips away but every time I look at them I wouldn't swap them for my R9T/5 with its old-school Teutonic charm and that glorious warbling engine. I also love the way it handles as long as I don't try compare it to a sports bike.
I get it....spot on.
 

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BMW R nineT Pure
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looking hard, trying to find something reasonably close. I'm throwing a wide net. I'd like to have a naked bike. Fairings don't do it for me. Jap iron only with the only exception being a Super Duke. TLs, SVs, RC 51s, Superhawks. I 'd like a liter displacement. Trying to stick to a twin. <9K$
Maybe have a look at the Yamaha MT-10 and the Suzuki GSX-S1000 variants. They aren't twins but they're great bikes, and wicked fast!

I know they aren't a Japanese bikes, but have you considered a Triumph Speed Triple or Street Triple? Most people rave about the triples. There are plenty of variants, too, and since they've been in production for years you might find a really nice example that won't break the bank.

Also -- extremely well said, @EvanJ !! You nailed pretty much how I think of my R9T Pure. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I plan on staying away from English. And my not distant ancestors hail from the the 1st Royal Tribe of Cardiff. The TR6 scarred me for life. I'm not necessarily interested in super fast. Twin is a must. I have a feeling I will have to live with a bunch of fiberglass. Need to sell the RNT first.
 

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Try removing the steering damper and going for a short ride. If you like it, get an Ohlins adjustable damper.

For me, this bike came alive with an adjustable steering damper, a better rear shock, and lightweight wheels that support tubeless tires. If I hadn't done those three things, I'd have my tongue hanging out for a new Speed Triple.
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Try removing the steering damper and going for a short ride. If you like it, get an Ohlins adjustable damper.

For me, this bike came alive with an adjustable steering damper, a better rear shock, and lightweight wheels that support tubeless tires. If I hadn't done those three things, I'd have my tongue hanging out for a new Speed Triple.
I will try removing the damper. Thanks.
 

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2018 R NineT - Blue Planet Metallic w/ 719 billet options
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I also had concerns about the R NineT's handling, braking, flicking, and accelerating when I first rode mine. Then I kept dialing in the suspension, made some upgrades to lighten up the bike, and finally bought the 719 tubeless wheels and new Michelin Pilot Power tires. Now this bike can definitely do everything very well. Was carving up some local twisties with a couple of friends yesterday on their Ducati Panigale V4 S and Aprilia Dorsoduro 900. I had no trouble keeping up at all in the corners or coming into or off the apex. Its all about set up.
 
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