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This has been a rather interesting thread. I will freely admit the boxers don't flick over as easily as some other configurations, but I also find my UGS to be more stable and predictable than some of my other quicker handling bikes. I also find it flicks over easier than the 1250 GS I test rode, but my Guzzi Stelvio flicks over easier than either. The Ducatis are very easy to flick over.

I prefer the more traditional Euro handling, read stability over flickability as I hate nervous feeling bikes and far too many these days have very steep steering angles that I think diminishes their handling. I find I can go faster easier on a more predictable bike that holds a line in the bumps etc. I've ridden a couple SV1000s, owned a Vstrom 1000, and currently own V-Twins from Ducati and Guzzi, plus a I4 and parallel twin. My favorite engine configuration is a V-twin, but the BMW boxer is unique and has a lot of other qualities I like, though I wish it didn't produce as much high frequency vibes. The older longer stroke boxers didn't put out the high frequency vibes so much.

Anyway, what's most important is you ride a bike(s) that please you, that's all that matters. Or.... you have a garage full of options cuz there's no one best bike. And sometimes change is needed just cuz.
 
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If that’s how you feel then that’s how you feel. Not all bikes are for everyone.
Find the one you enjoy the most and enjoy.
I was out riding my 2017 Roadster with Wilbers rear suspension the other day and it pleased me greatly. But then I am used to riding old Ducati’s.
Wrestling a heavy beast around corners all wild of hair and eye with a clutch lever that almost needs a pair of mole grips to operate it is how I like it. No pain no gain…lol
I must admit I am an old school rider with old school ways. In some ways I find the R nine t a bit too refined. But would never sell it.
Then again a nice condition Guzzi Le Mans Mk1 might tempt me.
I feel the same way about the 9T. There's something very satisfying with hustling this big analogue bike that makes it very rewarding when you get it right.

I ski for a living and it's similar to skiing GS skis vs Slalom skis. The slalom ski skis are 'on it' all the time and it's exhausting skiing something so lively . The GS ski takes more skill and precision to set up for the turn. Like the 9t.

I rode à ktm 790r Duke once. Turned like a waterboatman but I wouldn't want to be on one all the time.

Everyone is different though. I'm old enough to know what I like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I feel the same way about the 9T. There's something very satisfying with hustling this big analogue bike that makes it very rewarding when you get it right.

I ski for a living and it's similar to skiing GS skis vs Slalom skis. The slalom ski skis are 'on it' all the time and it's exhausting skiing something so lively . The GS ski takes more skill and precision to set up for the turn. Like the 9t.

I rode à ktm 790r Duke once. Turned like a waterboatman but I wouldn't want to be on one all the time.

Everyone is different though. I'm old enough to know what I like.
Being an old ski bum I find your analogy poignant and relatable.
 

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I spent this past weekend driving several Japanese V-twin engine sport bikes. I compared the handling characteristics to my `14 RNT. I am disappointed. I came off of a Harley and have had a dozen other motorcycles. All inline 4s or V-twins. To my addled and foggy memory I can state that I always felt that my previous bikes (except the hardtail chopper) all handled better than the RNT. I said to myself….self, “naah, can’t be” This weekend reinforced my correct memories.
I have only put on a couple thousand miles on the R9T in the last year. All of these miles have been solely on twisty roads. Never over 80mph. Sadly I have found that the BMW is awkward and needs firm coaxing to get that motor out of vertical and back to vertical. For a while I thought that it was just me . I thought that I just needed to get used to the handling characteristics of a boxer. Well I have it figured it out and can push it hard into and out of turns comfortably. For me there is markedly more effort required than there should be. Nature of the beast. I get it and thought that I could live with it. No matter the speed It does not match the look-lean and go cornering of V-Twins and to a lesser degree inline 4’s. I knew going into the purchase that this would be the case but was surprised as to the extent.
This weekend I drove four V-twins. Three 1000cc+ bikes and one 700cc bike on my roads. I reported the cornering on all four as “silky”. Simple physics reveals the truth again. In a turn the mass of those jugs hanging out in the wind on the RNTs short axis takes more energy to re-orientate their position relative to level as compared to V-twin.
Keeping as much mass as close to the COG is the key. Further away from COG the more energy required to change it’s position. Some racers used to keep the battery in the tail section. They found that getting that battery closer to the center of the bike improved handling markedly. And that mass is on the long axis
Mind you it’s all subjective analysis on my part. The majority here are happy with the handling, albeit some with suspension changes. In this issue suspension change would not do anything for the outboard mass transitions. There is much to like on the RNT, pains me to unload it. I’m not a multi-bike guy. Seems like when I had a few at the same time I always rode just one of them.
More than likely I will sell it for a V-2

Cheers.
I totally relate to what you say. Out of the 9 bikes in the stable, the R9T does not stand out in the handling or comfort area...
 

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This has been a wonderfully interesting thread. As highlighted throughout this thread, bikes tastes are very individual and you should definitely ride what calls to you. Life is way too short to be unhappy with anything. Just for giggles though, I would recommend playing with the config a little just to see if it makes any changes. Changing tires have always made a noticeable difference to me - sometimes good and sometimes not, but always a difference. My '12 Triumph Bonneville became much more confidence inspiring and flickable when I replaced the stock tires with Pirelli Sport Demons (this is the bike I traded in to get my '20 R9T/5). If you do not want to go that route, you can play with tire pressures and start with that.
On the R9T, the steering dampener seems to require more effort to turn in, but does help keep the bike more planted at speed. As suggested by another poster, maybe try removing it to see how that changes the handling.

Adjusting the suspension can help too. Start with the sag. When I adjusted the suspension setting on my '14 Triumph Street Triple R, it improved the handling. It only took a couple of clicks here and there. I ended up trading it in for my current '19 Triumph Speed Twin because I started acting like a hooligan every time I rode it.

Experimenting will give you the chance to try what works and what does not. Regardless, you will come out more knowledgeable and will likely have fun trying.
 

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After putting 40K+ miles on my wethead 2016 R1200RT (sometimes loaded up with a week's worth of touring gear), my new R NineT handles like a bicycle.

I took the RT for a short ride the other day just because I hadn't ridden it in a couple of weeks since getting the NineT. What used to feel sporty now felt like a Winnebago... a capable and sporty Winnegabo, but still big and very upright.

Before buying the R NineT I was convinced that I wanted something other than another boxer (e.g. S1000R or Ducati Monster or even a Yamaha MT-09 SP or XSR900) but once I rode it I knew that it was the bike for me. The handling was much improved but somehow familiar.
 
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The title of your thread pretty much sums up my recent BMW R9T experience but for different reasons.

I saw photos of a Racer online and fell in love with its looks. At the time I was looking for something new to fill the sporty role thats been occupied by my now semi-retired '92 900SS. I prefered something air cooled and was excited by the easy R9T maintenance schedule. Fit and finish on the bike was superb and it looked better in person so a 2018 model came home with me.



Now 3 yrs and 5000 miles later she just got sent off to a new home.

Tried my best to love the bike but quickly grew bored with its performance. Its really too civilized - an excellent power plant for a sport touring or standard machine but in a cafe racer hotrod role it really needs another 25 hp or to lose about 75 lbs...It did have a really nice 6th gear roll on and with its 58+ inch wheelbase it was rock solid up top.

It was a cool experience and I don't regret buying the bike. I did ok on its sale considering I didnt pay MSRP and rode it like I stole it for 3 yrs. Absolutely nothing negative to say, it just was not my cup of tea.

Again I like air cooled for simplicity sake so I sold the Racer and picked up a 2012 Monster 1100 Evo



Its everything the R9T is not - raw, uncivilized, and an absolute featherweight.
 

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After putting 40K+ miles on my wethead 2016 R1200RT (sometimes loaded up with a week's worth of touring gear), my new R NineT handles like a bicycle.

I took the RT for a short ride the other day just because I hadn't ridden it in a couple of weeks since getting the NineT. What used to feel sporty now felt like a Winnebago... a capable and sporty Winnegabo, but still big and very upright.
I know this is getting off-topic from the OP's post, but I wanted to chime in here.

When I was bike shopping last year before buying my R9T Pure, I test rode a newer R1200RT, I think a 2017 or 2018. I was coming from long-term ownership of a Honda VFR800, so I was used to a bike with a windshield and full fairing. I was looking for a daily rider to replace the VFR, thinking I would go with a naked bike, or at least something a little smaller than my Honda. Still, I was curious about the touring oriented bike.

But the RT seemed enormous -- and heavy. I'm glad I went with the R9T and happy with it, but I'm thinking of buying an older RT (or something similar) for long days and trips, which I'm doing more of the last couple years. I sat on a new R1250RT last week and thought, "Yeah, this is cool. I could see myself on one of these!" It's way out of my price range, but an older one with some miles on it might just be the ticket.
 

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As others have said.....an interesting thread, with many varied opinions and views.

Out of curiosity, may I ask Mr @Juice has he tried anything other than stock tyres on his '14 R9?
 

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When I adjusted the suspension setting on my '14 Triumph Street Triple R, it improved the handling. It only took a couple of clicks here and there. I ended up trading it in for my current '19 Triumph Speed Twin because I started acting like a hooligan every time I rode it.
I'm also a Street Triple fan, like you I sold my R because it also turned me into a hooligan. After only two months of R9T ownership I'm agonizing over selling it (still hasn't had it's first service) for another Street Triple.
I'm still hopeful (fingers crossed) the R9T will grow on me and become an old friend. I like my R9T, I loved the two Street Triples I've had in my life.
 

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Interesting thread, result shows how we're all different. I for one have no interest in Japanese bikes other then the CB1000 and the Z900RS as I'm a retro bike person generally. I'm also a European bike person. My spouse and I both ride, and in our garage the 1250RS is mine, and the GS and RT are "hers". The right ride of the garage though is all shared with a '22 NineT due to arrive in spring.

We're a multi bike family, and spoiled for choice. I would myself take a Triumph over a Japanese bike 10/10 times. They aren't what they used to be ages ago and are really at the same level as BMW on quality/fit/finish. If the NineT isn't doing it for you, a Speed Twin will. If all else fails pick up an old twitchy Ducati SportClassic or an air-cooled Monster. I get why might be weirdly set for a V-Twin, some people like excessive vibration. But the rest of the industry has largely moved to Parallels.

But before all that I'd definitely say try on different tires. The OEM Metzeler Z8's on now the "older" bikes have a really slow and lazy turn in profile compared to the Michelin Road 5's they now get. They handle great, but really don't fall into corners like the newer tires they now have My old R1200R, I nearly sold it because I hated the lazy handling with the Z8 Interacts. But that all went away when I changed to Road 5's on it.

Lastly, don't for a second consider an Indian FTR. We bought one, built it and sold it in less than a year. Achingly beautiful to look at, absolutely :poop: to actually ride. But for real, just put your bias in your pocket and go ride a Speed Twin. You can't not love it. Especially now that they all have USD forks. I'm building up one right now for my company, and it's awesome. Will be painting it Porsche Miami Blue over the winter.



Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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Interesting thread, result shows how we're all different. I for one have no interest in Japanese bikes other then the CB1000 and the Z900RS as I'm a retro bike person generally. I'm also a European bike person. My spouse and I both ride, and in our garage the 1250RS is mine, and the GS and RT are "hers". The right ride of the garage though is all shared with a '22 NineT due to arrive in spring.
...
Will be painting it Porsche Miami Blue over the winter.
Absolute drool-worthy garage... I like your style Diva!
 

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I spent this past weekend driving several Japanese V-twin engine sport bikes. I compared the handling characteristics to my `14 RNT. I am disappointed. I came off of a Harley and have had a dozen other motorcycles. All inline 4s or V-twins. To my addled and foggy memory I can state that I always felt that my previous bikes (except the hardtail chopper) all handled better than the RNT. I said to myself….self, “naah, can’t be” This weekend reinforced my correct memories.
I have only put on a couple thousand miles on the R9T in the last year. All of these miles have been solely on twisty roads. Never over 80mph. Sadly I have found that the BMW is awkward and needs firm coaxing to get that motor out of vertical and back to vertical. For a while I thought that it was just me . I thought that I just needed to get used to the handling characteristics of a boxer. Well I have it figured it out and can push it hard into and out of turns comfortably. For me there is markedly more effort required than there should be. Nature of the beast. I get it and thought that I could live with it. No matter the speed It does not match the look-lean and go cornering of V-Twins and to a lesser degree inline 4’s. I knew going into the purchase that this would be the case but was surprised as to the extent.
This weekend I drove four V-twins. Three 1000cc+ bikes and one 700cc bike on my roads. I reported the cornering on all four as “silky”. Simple physics reveals the truth again. In a turn the mass of those jugs hanging out in the wind on the RNTs short axis takes more energy to re-orientate their position relative to level as compared to V-twin.
Keeping as much mass as close to the COG is the key. Further away from COG the more energy required to change it’s position. Some racers used to keep the battery in the tail section. They found that getting that battery closer to the center of the bike improved handling markedly. And that mass is on the long axis
Mind you it’s all subjective analysis on my part. The majority here are happy with the handling, albeit some with suspension changes. In this issue suspension change would not do anything for the outboard mass transitions. There is much to like on the RNT, pains me to unload it. I’m not a multi-bike guy. Seems like when I had a few at the same time I always rode just one of them.
More than likely I will sell it for a V-2

Cheers.
It's important that you choose what works for you... Language is similar...Some of us prefer straight expression of words, with little to no variation..Getting the message across with no chance of generating any misunderstanding...Some of us still, though, use plenty of slang, all generously , peppered, and spiced with huge dollops of swearing... The R Nine T occupies the latter slot.... Centre stage. . ALL THE BEST TO YOU. RUBBER DOWN! LIDS UP!!
 

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Interesting thread, result shows how we're all different. I for one have no interest in Japanese bikes other then the CB1000 and the Z900RS as I'm a retro bike person generally. I'm also a European bike person. My spouse and I both ride, and in our garage the 1250RS is mine, and the GS and RT are "hers". The right ride of the garage though is all shared with a '22 NineT due to arrive in spring.

We're a multi bike family, and spoiled for choice. I would myself take a Triumph over a Japanese bike 10/10 times. They aren't what they used to be ages ago and are really at the same level as BMW on quality/fit/finish. If the NineT isn't doing it for you, a Speed Twin will. If all else fails pick up an old twitchy Ducati SportClassic or an air-cooled Monster. I get why might be weirdly set for a V-Twin, some people like excessive vibration. But the rest of the industry has largely moved to Parallels.

But before all that I'd definitely say try on different tires. The OEM Metzeler Z8's on now the "older" bikes have a really slow and lazy turn in profile compared to the Michelin Road 5's they now get. They handle great, but really don't fall into corners like the newer tires they now have My old R1200R, I nearly sold it because I hated the lazy handling with the Z8 Interacts. But that all went away when I changed to Road 5's on it.

Lastly, don't for a second consider an Indian FTR. We bought one, built it and sold it in less than a year. Achingly beautiful to look at, absolutely :poop: to actually ride. But for real, just put your bias in your pocket and go ride a Speed Twin. You can't not love it. Especially now that they all have USD forks. I'm building up one right now for my company, and it's awesome. Will be painting it Porsche Miami Blue over the winter.



Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
Oooogh 😍😍😍😍😍 candy land..surely.... aaand he faints
 
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