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Things I've picked up reading this thread and exploring a few rabbit holes along the way.

No US or Canadian distributor has chosen to import Continental tubes. I'm sure it's a business decision, but not sure what's behind it. Perhaps better margin on other brands, perhaps as a low cost leader, there is more net sales opportunity is selling a slightly higher priced tube at the same margin at scale.

There is a distinction between radial tubes and bias tubes, but talking about them that way is misleading. There's not really such a thing as a radial tube, it's more correct to think of them as tubes made for radial tires. Many motocross and off road tires are still bias ply tires, don't build the same amount of heat during use. Because they can be susceptible to pinch flats, many riders prefer to run heavy duty (thicker) tubes. Those tubes are not appropriate for use in road applications because they build and retain more heat than thinner tubes. The tubes used in radial tires tend to be thinner, more flexible, and retain less heat when in use. The Continental tubes are spec'd at 1.5mm, and the Metzler's between 1.7mm &1.8mm. The tubes for bias ply tires can be up to 4mm thick.

There is a significant difference in the rim between tubeless and tube type where the valve hole is. On tubeless type rims, there is a flat machined around the valve hole so the value can be set flat and seal properly. On a tube type wheel, the value seat integrated into the tube does the work of preventing tire from leaking from the value. As such, most tube type rims have no special treatment around the valve hole.

Speculation: I'm guessing that the reason it was recommended never to run tubes in tubeless rims with tubeless tires has to do with the valve hold situation and with the internal rim profile. It may be that the machined edges of the value stem hole are sharp enough to cut tubes. It's also possible that the valve stem seat on an inner tube won't set properly in a rim that has a narrow channel where the value hole is drilled. Again, just speculation. If you were running an inner tube on a tubeless rim and got a puncture in the tube near the valve stem (tubes do move when in use, and there is expansion and contraction that happens), the tubeless tire would loose air because the valve is not sealed to the rim in the same way it is when running a true tubeless setup.

Image of the inner rim profile on a 2014 r nineT. These are not traditional tube type rims. They do have the bump designed to hold the bead in place after the tire is mounted, which means that in theory, sealing the rim and using a tubeless tire is less risky than trying to do it on a rim that doesn't have the bump. My local shop was nice enough to snap these for me while replacing my tube and remounting my tire yesterday.

View attachment 161119 View attachment 161120
As you have shown ,
we have bead lock tubeless spoked wheels,
my 2018 has the same with a slightly different rim well design,
you will see MT and rim width in the markings,
it has a shallow taper to grip the inflated tyre , the raised inner rim edge prevents the tubeless tyre bead moving inwards holding it in place and air tight at the rim,
some early ktm and possibly others had morse taper, MT marked rims without the bead lock,
many tubed rims were marked WM, no taper or bead lock,
the mechanical motor-cross bead lock/clamps are a different set up for off road use,
we all have different preferences on our bikes, including tyres,
my personal choice is tyre secure on the rim, and tubeless tyres,
Road speed rarely gets to 100 mph,
the quicker turn in with less effort and suspension compliance with tubes removed works for me ,
the later shallow well cast and spoked bmw rims do need a bit more technique to dismount/mount which is reassuring when the flat tyre wallow starts,
Forest,
 

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I didn't comprehend much of that last post at all. It went right over my head. As a scrambler owner, with tubeless spoked rims, I was planning on buying a tube for my tool kit in case I managed to tear the sidewall of a tire when far from civilization. I'm now wondering if that's a good idea now or just go with the likelihood of major tire damage as minimal and stick with plugs and a compressor already on hand.
 

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I didn't comprehend much of that last post at all. It went right over my head. As a scrambler owner, with tubeless spoked rims, I was planning on buying a tube for my tool kit in case I managed to tear the sidewall of a tire when far from civilization. I'm now wondering if that's a good idea now or just go with the likelihood of major tire damage as minimal and stick with plugs and a compressor already on hand.
If you tear your side wall a tube won't help. Not saying that it can't happen, but I have never experienced a torn sidewall on a puncture as of yet. Just a good old fashion plug kit should do the trick. I really don't understand this thread that much. If you're running tubeless, tires carry a patch kit and a pump. If you're running tube, tires carry an extra inner tube , pump and the proper tools to fix your tire. that seems like a logical thing to do. In my opinion tires.
 

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If you tear your side wall a tube won't help.
Yes, but tires is such a fun and volatile topic. One of my favorites. You're probably right about the likelihood of tearing a sidewall. I imagined using a heavy fabric or a chunk of riding armor to protect the tube from a torn tire but that would mean I'd have to be able to remove the tire to accomplish such a patch and then a tube may not even work. I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill. I'm sure a plug or two will get me home in just about any scenario. At the rate I'm burning through tires though, they'll ever get a chance to get old. So... what kind of oil should I use? ;)
 

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I didn't comprehend much of that last post at all. It went right over my head. As a scrambler owner, with tubeless spoked rims, I was planning on buying a tube for my tool kit in case I managed to tear the sidewall of a tire when far from civilization. I'm now wondering if that's a good idea now or just go with the likelihood of major tire damage as minimal and stick with plugs and a compressor already on hand.
How could it hurt to carry a tube if it got you home 鈥 even at 15mph 鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹ Blitz
 

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How could it hurt to carry a tube if it got you home 鈥 even at 15mph 鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹ Blitz
The big issue is the extra tools required to get a tube in the tire. Mainly, the front axle wrench and tire irons big enough to break the bead. On a tubeless tire, they'd have to be robust to say the least. Storage space is a real premium on these bikes already. And, like @Baloo mentioned, the likelihood of tearing a dirt oriented tire on a bike this size seems wildly unlikely. Even a small tear can usually be managed with a few plugs, enough to get home anyway.
 

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The big issue is the extra tools required to get a tube in the tire. Mainly, the front axle wrench and tire irons big enough to break the bead. On a tubeless tire, they'd have to be robust to say the least. Storage space is a real premium on these bikes already. And, like @Baloo mentioned, the likelihood of tearing a dirt oriented tire on a bike this size seems wildly unlikely. Even a small tear can usually be managed with a few plugs, enough to get home anyway.
Got it 鈥. Ofcourse 鈥. I鈥檝e never field stripped a tubless, and only a few tube tires, I was only thinking about the relatively low mass of a tube 鈥.. duhhhh !
鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹︹ I only ever carried tire tools when I was traveling and I kept them in my back pack. 鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹..Blitz
 

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If you have tubes just carry a patch kit. If you can see where the flat was created (nail, screw, etc. ) then put that part of the tire facing forward on a front tire and backward on a arear tire to give you more room to work, and using tire irons just pop off the bead on one side from the top to the bottom. Reach in and pull the damaged part of the tube out, patch it, slide it back in and pump it up. There is no need to remove the wheel to patch a tube.

If you have tubeless tires, it will be far less effort to simply plug the tire than it would be to install a tube. If you wanted to put a tube in, you'll need to remove the valve stem and TPMS sensor to make room for the valve stem of the tube.

In both of those cases, having the tire (or tube) filled with the proper amount of Ride-On TPS or Sahara Moto flat sealant would probably prevent the majority of average punctures.
 

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I change my tires myself at home, just because I can and get satisfaction out of it.
But it is impossible for me to repair an inner tube of that size on the road.
I just wouldn't get the tire lever between rim and tire, probably just ruining the rim.
I'm glad I got rid of my inner tubes.
 

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@GapRunr I agree a patch kit is always a good idea but my experience with tubes is that the majority of flats I've had, resulted in the tube being damaged beyond repair . Any extended rides on the standard has a front tire tube in my repair kit. (Front works in a rear). Adv habits die hard.
 
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