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Discussion Starter #1
I live in the mountains of Colorado a long way from a BMW dealer. What are the pros and cons of making the long trek to the dealer for this service? I plan to do the subsequent ones myself. Thanks!
 

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Here's a thread that contains answers to your question: 600 mile maintenance

In a nut shell, this honestly depends on the dealership and what potential warranty claim you may file in the future (hopefully none). But most times, unless you put the wrong oil or wrong oil amount that leads to engine failure, doing the maintenance yourself shouldn't void the warranty.

You can always call your dealership and ask (just be sure to at the very least buy only oem product (if available) from an authorized dealer and keep receipts during the warranty period).

For reference, I bought my Triumph Thruxton 1200r new, and did my own first service, then a few weeks later, I had an issue with the gauge cluster. It was replaced free under warranty, despite me not being in the system that the dealer did the first service. I did buy oem Triumph oil filter and Castrol oil and kept receipts just in case.
 

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I believe in the US at least, they aren't allowed to make the warranty contingent on them doing the work. I owned my R1200R while it was still under warranty but I wanted to do the services myself and wanted to avoid any issues, so I purchased all BMW products needed--oil and final drive oil, crush washers, etc.--and then took dated pictures of the work as I did it.
 

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Besides the above thread, check out post#954 and following in the “punted posts” thread, lots of fun stuff there to at least consider.👍
 

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I will not take a chance. For me that 600 mile service has always been the important one. No specific reason why.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will not take a chance. For me that 600 mile service has always been the important one. No specific reason why.
I would normally agree, but that 3 hour trip one way and then getting back home is a tough one.
 

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I had my 600-mile "running in service" done by the dealer. It was expensive, but they were more thorough than I would have been, and checked things I wouldn't have checked, partially because I either don't know how or don't have the right diagnostic tool. In addition to changing the oil and filter, they adjusted the throttle cable, retorqued all major fasteners to spec, and checked the computer for codes (there were none). I performed the 2nd oil change myself, and plan to do most routine maintenance myself, too.

That being said, I keep my purchase receipts and I'm pretty meticulous about recording all repairs on a spreadsheet, both those done by the shop and those I do myself. If I ever have a engine, final drive, electrical, or any other warranty issue I'll have the documents to back up what I did and when.
 

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I live in the mountains of Colorado a long way from a BMW dealer. What are the pros and cons of making the long trek to the dealer for this service? I plan to do the subsequent ones myself. Thanks!
Prepare yourself. Someone on here is going to chime up soon and tell you adding air in your own tires will void the warranty and you'll end up in court for years.. lol .... As recommended, start reading the shitshow I regrettably participated in that starts at post #954 and look at the actual facts and make an informed decision.
 

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When I bought my bike from the dealership, the sale was conditional that I would do my own maintenance on the bike without affecting the warranty.
They accepted and all they wanted was proof of receipt that I bought OEM oil and oil filter.

For the 600 miles (1000km) maintenance, you can change the oils yourself but there is something you need the dealer to do. If my memory is right, it is synchronizing the body throttle.

The best thing you can do is to buy the service manual CD on ebay.
 

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You can even synchronize the throttle bodies yourself. Twin Max is the only tool to use there and take a video while doing it if your that concerned. Some dealers just love to scare the living crap out of folks, granted some folks along with most technicians shouldn't even touch a hammer but that's another rant.
Oh and again, receipts are golden in any court and no the dealer can NOT void your warranty, they answer to corporate which is the monkey with the big nuts.
 

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There are a few schools of thought on this. Locally we have up to 5 year warranties on the bike. If serviced with a dealer it is less hassle as the dealer will not wish too be held liable for negligence. I have had claims outside of warranty period fixed by BMW purely because the failure to do so in warranty period was their fault. I also pay, not for knowledge, but experience, if they get it wrong it is on them. If I insist working on it becasue it is my right to do so, it is their right to investigate the service history and then the risk is on you. If you wish to keep the bike and you are a better mechaninc than the dealer, by all means go for it. If you wish to crunch the bike for 5000 miles and then sell it, by all means go for it. Not fair to new buyer who might potentially be in for an (un)pleasent surprise and maybe you are not so lucky. I am not a mechanic and have learned the hard way that there is something called"experience" and that you earn. There is the joke about a ship having engine troubles and it could not be fixed by a technician and even the engineers that buit the engine. Eventually someone advised that they should contact the retired ship engineer that worked on it for years. He came in walked around, looked and listened, then asked for a hammer and after a few minutes gave the engine a huge whack. Problem solved. The bill came to 10 000$ and the company refused to pay asking for a detailed statement. When the bill came the engineer charged 50$ for the hammer and the balance for knowing where to hit.Make a call and put your trust in "you tube" mechanics at your own risk. 😄 My view, feel free to agree to disagree.
 

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There are a few schools of thought on this. Locally we have up to 5 year warranties on the bike. If serviced with a dealer it is less hassle as the dealer will not wish too be held liable for negligence. I have had claims outside of warranty period fixed by BMW purely because the failure to do so in warranty period was their fault. I also pay, not for knowledge, but experience, if they get it wrong it is on them. If I insist working on it becasue it is my right to do so, it is their right to investigate the service history and then the risk is on you. If you wish to keep the bike and you are a better mechaninc than the dealer, by all means go for it. If you wish to crunch the bike for 5000 miles and then sell it, by all means go for it. Not fair to new buyer who might potentially be in for an (un)pleasent surprise and maybe you are not so lucky. I am not a mechanic and have learned the hard way that there is something called"experience" and that you earn. There is the joke about a ship having engine troubles and it could not be fixed by a technician and even the engineers that buit the engine. Eventually someone advised that they should contact the retired ship engineer that worked on it for years. He came in walked around, looked and listened, then asked for a hammer and after a few minutes gave the engine a huge whack. Problem solved. The bill came to 10 000$ and the company refused to pay asking for a detailed statement. When the bill came the engineer charged 50$ for the hammer and the balance for knowing where to hit.Make a call and put your trust in "you tube" mechanics at your own risk. 😄 My view, feel free to agree to disagree.
I am very much inclined with @JohanH on this. I justify paying the 'elevated' prices for a dealer service and some BMW official accessories as psuedo insurance in case something goes wrong with the bike. I've had three BMWs with the same dealer and the dealer has been good as gold in rectifying any issues and sorting warranty claims, with virtually no argument or push-back. In one instance, when I couldn't replicate a fault after delivering the bike to them, the took my word for it and changed out about £300 pounds worth of labour and materials under warranty, solely on the basis of trust we had built up over the years. When servicing the bike, the dealer has always provided a loan bike free of charge which is good for either not missing time out off work or just enjoying yourself on a near-as-dammit new bike whilst yours is being serviced.

It is said that dealers make most of their profit not through sale of bikes but rather servicing and accessories; regardless of whether this is true or not one might hope that the earnings they make can be used to attract and retain better mechanics to ensure our bikes get good care and attention (if you are tempted to comment on my naivety save yourself the trouble; it's water off a ducks back). Does this guarantee that nothing will go wrong? Absolutely not, we are all human and fallible. Are you forced to you take the bike to your dealer to avoid voiding the warranty? No idea, more informed people can argue that one.

In all in, my personal experience is that building a relationship with the dealer through regular servicing, etc. has paid significant dividends in peace of mind and a great BMW ownership experience. That being said, my dealer is only 20 minutes from where I live and am aware that others have been (regrettably) much less fortunate with their local dealers, I feel for these people. If it were three hours away, I would be tempted to make a day trip of it. Drop off the bike, ask for a loaner, go for a ride, and then pick yours up and either ride home or stay a night somewhere.

Best of luck @Redbird457
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks, all. Good food for thought. Again, it is not so much the money but the logistics of getting the bike there, getting a ride back (and back) and getting it home. If there were a good twisty route from here to there it might be a bit easier decision...
 

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Thanks, all. Good food for thought. Again, it is not so much the money but the logistics of getting the bike there, getting a ride back (and back) and getting it home. If there were a good twisty route from here to there it might be a bit easier decision...
The 600 mile service takes about an hour. Go make and ride to the appointment with them knowing you are planning to wait for the bike to be done, grab a cup of coffee, talk to the salesman who you bought the bike from, walk around the shop or area with a plan to ride afterward. Its only money and getting the bike squared away with a complete dealer record will very well make your bike more attractive to the next owner. Need I remind everyone - they bought a premium luxury item knowing everything on the bike is outragously priced but part of the deal when you ride one due to its quality and eventually paid back when you resell it. Also it is not unheard of the dealership giving you a gift of being a good, new customer when you come back in with your new baby... They do in some stores here in California while other lesser stealerships are less customer freindly.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@ridercam - now that is really good to know. In that case I will head to the dealer one nice day!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ask them to do a few test rides and try out a few of their other products like the R18. I was never a fan of the nine t until I rode one. Something just clicked.😁
 
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