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Discussion Starter #1
After a fair bit of thought thinking of a new R Nine T. I am used to getting discounts in the past when buying new bikes (I will be paying cash) when buying Jap bikes, Triumph's and the like. Question is, what sort of discount (if any) is the norm when buying one of these? Many thanks
 

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I negotiated £500 off and a free 600mile service for an urban back in June 2018.
No px and I paid cash.
It wasnt the exact spec I wanted but was in stock in UK so deal struck.
Annoyingly they announced extending warranty from 2 to 3 years shortly after which I missed !
Very happy with the bike.
 

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I got a really good deal on my Racer back in Jan 2019 (£8K against list of £12-13K), but that was due to specific circumstances rather than a predictable dealer discount.
I think due to its extreme riding position the Racer was selling really badly so quite a few dealers had brand new bikes clogging up their showrooms and wanted them moved on.
Mine had been in a crate for 18 months before the dealer decided to break it out and pre-register it to improve their "sales" figures.
Not sure if the market is that poor on any of the current "new" model range?
But I guess my case proves that a deal can be had if the timing is right. Just have to keep your eyes peeled and look for "end of the quarter and desperate to make their sales target/get their manufacturer bonus" type deals.
 

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What an interesting read - a sort of step back in time to the days when folk actually bought bikes for real money! Now the business model has evolved to the point where folk wanting to pay cash is an inconvenience and discounting is frowned upon by both the marketing and finance divisions. However, there are often opportunities to work the system to your advantage if you know how to play the game. From the dealer's perspective, the worst scenario is someone wanting a big discount and paying cash - their ability to make a profit is very limited. Far better if the customer takes out a finance package, a service package, a set of new clothing and specifies a load of factory and/or dealer fitted accessories - now that's where profit can be made. As for paying cash and getting a discount - if the dealer has a new bike on the shop floor - and it has been sitting there for a few months, then you can ask for and expect some sort of deal - the dealer can offer you their own deal/discount and they often have a manufacturer's incentive to play with as well. When I bought my R9T, the model/spec I really wanted was in short supply right across the UK so the deal wasn't up to much. However, the minute I showed serious interest in a showroom model which had been sitting for a while - suddenly a 'compelling proposition' appeared on the table before me. Good to read that there are still some bikers out there, who during the economic downturn can still afford to actually buy their bikes.
 

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I would highly recommend looking for a bike at this time of year and seeing what dealers have in the way of new stock. I.e bikes that are brand new and ready to go. I bought my standard R9T on finance but essentially got it for £11k though the list price including options was £12800. As Neep! mentions it's great that you're willing to pay cash. Taking on debt to anyone in these economic times is best avoided at all costs! Don't be afraid to walk away and take your time, I'm sure there's some great deals to be had.
 

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After a fair bit of thought thinking of a new R Nine T. I am used to getting discounts in the past when buying new bikes (I will be paying cash) when buying Jap bikes, Triumph's and the like. Question is, what sort of discount (if any) is the norm when buying one of these? Many thanks
Just one point here... you say you're paying cash, but remember that cash sales limit the dealer's opportunity for profit. From their perpsective it's NOT a good thing.

Make sure that you keep the fact that you're a cash buyer to yourself until such time that you've completely concluded the price negotiations (just say that you're undecided how you'll pay, but are happy to listen to any finance offers AFTER you've agreed a final sale price).
 

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Just mulling over whether @Fast H is progressing with his BMW RNineT purchase? I was also reflecting on exactly what is a 'good deal'? Certainly I always like to feel that the dealer appreciates my custom and offers value for money - no sane person enjoys feeling short-changed or ripped off. However, if you do purchase a new bike then sometimes it's the after-sales service that will give you the most heartache - not that initial purchase price! I've experience of negotiating a competitive initial purchase price but then finding out I've just purchased several years hassle of dealership incompetence and grief. There is one particular brand of European (non-BMW) motorcycle that I wouldn't touch even if I could get a 50% discount - after their local dealer, the UK importer and the European Factory failed to sort the electronics on a 2 year old bike. So maybe happiness is not all about that juicy big discount off the published retail price?
 

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Just mulling over whether @Fast H is progressing with his BMW RNineT purchase? I was also reflecting on exactly what is a 'good deal'? Certainly I always like to feel that the dealer appreciates my custom and offers value for money - no sane person enjoys feeling short-changed or ripped off. However, if you do purchase a new bike then sometimes it's the after-sales service that will give you the most heartache - not that initial purchase price! I've experience of negotiating a competitive initial purchase price but then finding out I've just purchased several years hassle of dealership incompetence and grief. There is one particular brand of European (non-BMW) motorcycle that I wouldn't touch even if I could get a 50% discount - after their local dealer, the UK importer and the European Factory failed to sort the electronics on a 2 year old bike. So maybe happiness is not all about that juicy big discount off the published retail price?
This is a very astute observation. The sales experience is akin to a one off, whereas service and aftermarket is more regular. Ive got three dealerships near me and tend to gravitate towards the one which has provided me with the best service experience given they’ll have the bike at least once a year; and Ill pop in every quarter for parts and accessories. It goes a long way if you can develop and maintain a good relationship. In the past I’ve had some fantastic discounts on parts and accessories, and have valued the no quibbles approach to warranty work. Its never a pleasant experience to have to incessantly argue about fixing issues when under warranty, and ask ‘best price’ for any accessories (haggling is not a ‘thing’ here). Challenge is that people in the dealerships move on, and so sometimes the level of service changes also.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Yes I'm still looking at a RNine T, going for a test ride Sunday. I concur with your comments re what constitutes a good deal. However at the point of purchase you don't really have much idea about what a dealer is like re servicing and customer service, so getting a fair price on the bike is a good start in my opinion.
 

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Yes I'm still looking at a RNine T, going for a test ride Sunday. I concur with your comments re what constitutes a good deal. However at the point of purchase you don't really have much idea about what a dealer is like re servicing and customer service, so getting a fair price on the bike is a good start in my opinion.
Looks like we are in broad agreement with each other - no ranting and a civilised sharing of forum experience, expertise and objectives. Now go and explore the R9T riding experience on Sunday and then make the decision on a personal 'grin factor'.
 

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Challenge is that people in the dealerships move on, and so sometimes the level of service changes also.
That point has bothered me for many years - you get to know a particular sales person, technician or parts person and then suddenly they disappear from a favoured dealership. Then you have to start rebuilding relationships all over again with someone who patently doesn't know you (or your requirements), the brand or the products. A key factor in me becoming an R9T owner were staff changes at another brand's dealership - after six years of regular sales and servicing, my key contacts had all 'moved on' and no-one seemed interested in me or my wallet. When I bought my R9T the chap doing the handover had over 20 years BMW experience - rather re-assuring and it was obvious he really knows the product.
 

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That point has bothered me for many years - you get to know a particular sales person, technician or parts person and then suddenly they disappear from a favoured dealership. Then you have to start rebuilding relationships all over again with someone who patently doesn't know you (or your requirements), the brand or the products. A key factor in me becoming an R9T owner were staff changes at another brand's dealership - after six years of regular sales and servicing, my key contacts had all 'moved on' and no-one seemed interested in me or my wallet. When I bought my R9T the chap doing the handover had over 20 years BMW experience - rather re-assuring and it was obvious he really knows the product.
Agreed. As mentioned in my original post, I am lucky to have three dealerships in my area so I have a high level of choice when it comes to whom will be parting with my money. And it allows for some degree of friendly mischief from time to time e.g. "but -insert dealer name here- said they could do it for £100 less...". Sometimes it certainly feels that its the good sales agents and engineers that go, but that's life and I wish them all the best.

Fully recognise that others and are not so lucky to have a choice (i.e. only 1 dealer within 100 miles) and I vehemently detest the dealers who take advantage of that to provide a sub standard service (curses to them!). Specialist (non OEM) workshops can be a godsend in these circumstances, though they don't always have it easy when it comes to providing the same level of diagnostics and electronic repairs that might be required by more modern bikes. Good thing the R NineT is more of a back to basics machine.
 

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Back when I walked into dealer and told the salesman I had cash, He said when you finance the bank gives me cash too. Here is my best price.
 
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