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While it sounds a bit too kludgy for my taste, one can’t overstate the awfulness of Texas heat.
Well I know this mod would slow down you and your moto and certainly interfere with your competition in the TT this year but it actually suits the near 70 days in a row just last year, that’s 2019 in which the temperature reached or exceeded 100 F in Dallas, that’s Dallas “Texas”. You actually commute daily on your T don’t you, or are you a fair weather rider on weekends when you finish painting ? Or is that overstated as well ?

..nobody cares if you do or don’t do anything to you moto, but to imply that I overstated about the temps in Texas, LOOK IT UP what you think your the weatherman? ...and yes there are all kinds of places on earth that are as hot and hotter, so run your machines to the edges of extremes, it’s Ok. Any engine builder out there will tell you the ONLY enemy of a power plant is friction and heat, so you go for it. Me I’m going to do every little thing I can to help protect my little German girl. I’d like to believe that’s why I got just over 230,000 miles on my last one. And that’s not over stated either. ??? StayUpOn2 and out of the heat
... it tends to dry up your paints
 

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Huh? You misread what I wrote. I’m agreeing with you that it can be very very hot in Texas.

ps. My commute is 20 feet. ?
You lucky dog, I suppose parking isn’t a problem either.... now I’m really jealous ...and I love to paint as well, airbrush mostly and more illustration than fine art. I’ve had a few bottles of India ink ruin my leather saddle bags from Texas heat. StayUpOn2 Gristle ✌
 

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What? You think that BMW engineers don't test engines, parts etc for the extremes in markets that they sell to? Please.
Absolutely each to your own, but it's absolutely unnecessary and it's scaremongering for people who are less mechanically minded or may not know the history of the engines.
You're not protecting anything, you're adding a feature to your motorbike that YOU think is necessary. It's not a preventative measure for engine longevity by any means.



It might be absurd to Americans, but there are countries in the world with temperatures and weather conditions that are of equal or worse severity. Try living in the UAE/Gulf. BMW also sells cars and motorbikes there too.
Oh Manol, nobody’s scared or being bullied ... you quite free not to do anything to your moto you don’t want to and that includes the right to just wear it out. Scaremongering
Wow that’s a really big word when it was just a little hint .... while your at it ask those engineers you referred to what’s the primary enemy of a modern engine actually is. If they say to you ...

Der Hauptfeind eines jeden Motors ist die Hitze. Deshalb haben wir einen Ölkühler an einen luftgekühlten Motor angeschlossen. Es wurde zu heiß!

Then maybe you’ll understand why the oil cooler on the 9T was an after thought from the engineers you refer to because it was running just a little to hot to only be air cooled except on the track when it’s going 100+ Not in traffic going 15mph. Scaremongering ?
Did I spell that right ? ??
 

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Oho
Der Hauptfeind eines jeden Motors ist die Hitze. Deshalb haben wir einen Ölkühler an einen luftgekühlten Motor angeschlossen. Es wurde zu heiß!
Blitz spricht deutsch !

Pretty sure the Iron brick of an engine will be ok....I talked to a few ppl here in aus before I bought the UGS and they all just laughed temp problems off.... Yesterday I did hours of super low speed in 35 deg with no wind, full on sun and a lot of digging etc in sand with no probs (for the bike, I did struggle hahah) .... There are lots of bikes here for sale with close to 200.000km on the clock after beig abused and bashed around up north in 40 + degree heat every day of their life... Thats one of the reasons why I did not buy the guzzi tt 85 but went for the UGS.
Just make sure to keep the oil fresh and you'll be fine.
 

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Then maybe you’ll understand why the oil cooler on the 9T was an after thought from the engineers you refer to because it was running just a little to hot to only be air cooled except on the track when it’s going 100+ Not in traffic going 15mph.
What on earth are you on about? Every single variety and version of the R1200 motor has had an oil cooler back to the SOHC version. The R1200GS did a good job of hiding it in the front beak. (In fact the R1150GS and the R1100GS also both hid oil coilers in their front beaks which has become a signature of GS models even after it wasn't needed for the cooler.) You can plainly see the oil cooler sitting between the cylinders, in front of the belt guard on a pre-2015 R1200R which shares a lot of motor and chassis components with the R nineT. The 1170cc mill always has been air/oil cooled from the very first day it ran off the assembly line in a 2004 R1200GS. In fact every version of the preceding 1130cc mill in the R1150 and 1085cc mill in the R1100 machines is air/oil cooled as well. Its so integral to the character of these engines that they got the name Oilheads after the change from the long running Airheads which were air cooled only. @BlitzSchnell you are patently false in claiming any oil cooler is an after thought, if anything it was made larger on purpose.

So to everyone else, do what makes you comfortable. But my honest and personal advice is just ride your machine and don't pay too much attention to the temp gauge unless you've been slow/sitting for an extended time. It has a temp warning light and thermal shut down for a reason. Stop overthinking it as I've said prior in this same thread.

Or if you really wanted all the fans, fairings and bags perhaps the R1200RT would have been the better choice...
 

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What on earth are you on about? Every single variety and version of the R1200 motor has had an oil cooler back to the SOHC version. The R1200GS did a good job of hiding it in the front beak. (In fact the R1150GS and the R1100GS also both hid oil coilers in their front beaks which has become a signature of GS models even after it wasn't needed for the cooler.) You can plainly see the oil cooler sitting between the cylinders, in front of the belt guard on a pre-2015 R1200R which shares a lot of motor and chassis components with the R nineT. The 1170cc mill always has been air/oil cooled from the very first day it ran off the assembly line in a 2004 R1200GS. In fact every version of the preceding 1130cc mill in the R1150 and 1085cc mill in the R1100 machines is air/oil cooled as well. Its so integral to the character of these engines that they got the name Oilheads after the change from the long running Airheads which were air cooled only. @BlitzSchnell you are patently false in claiming any oil cooler is an after thought, if anything it was made larger on purpose.

So to everyone else, do what makes you comfortable. But my honest and personal advice is just ride your machine and don't pay too much attention to the temp gauge unless you've been slow/sitting for an extended time. It has a temp warning light and thermal shut down for a reason. Stop overthinking it as I've said prior in this same thread.

Or if you really wanted all the fans, fairings and bags perhaps the R1200RT would have been the better choice...
You right Ot2 I just couldn’t pass up the looks of the R9T, and the deal I made to own her. I’m to old for sitting on a cafe racer for more than 20 minutes at a time. After I work out all the wander-lust I seem to still have in my system I’ll bob my girl to bare minimum and never get over 50mph again. Let’s see, I’ll be around 106 years old. Hell I'm still getting accustomed to fuel injection. I should have bought a Goldwing, yeah right! You ever seen a loaded Goldwing up on the back tire, UpOn 1 ? I haven’t either. ...and your right, I don’t pay any attention to the gages until sitting in dead locked traffic and I can smell the oil boiling in the case. She stopped doing that when I put a fan on her cooler. I just do what works that’s all.
Thanks for schooling me and the advice mate. Cheers
 

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As you can see, I don’t know anything about computers either. I much more enjoyed sharing moto stories sitting around a fire with a beer instead of hugging a damn computer. Fix it for me Mods.
Thanks ... Cheers
 
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Stressed

Good morning all,

I am looking for information on the "normal" temperature of an R NINE T.

Today after 4 hours of driving at good speed on winding roads, outside temperature: 8C (46F) degrees, I take the highway. As I get bored, I wander through the LCD menus and find to the engine temperature which was 105 C (221) at 130/140 kmh (90Mph). from memory I find that a bit high. I stop and check the oil level. And there, the level no longer appeared in the window,
actually just at the bottom of the window
(big big shame on me..) I added 500ml of oil too quick and the level was totally above the max sign, and the window.

Not having tools to empty the surplus I had to continue my journey (2 hours of highway+30 min city) The temperature did not rise higher still around 97c and 102c (206,6F and 215,6F) but once in town it quickly rose to 124 C degrees (255.2F)

According to you is this a normal temperature or i f**cked up my bike?

Thank you
 

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Temperatures are normal for eight degrees. There is a thread about this somewhere on forum. In summer in town, mine easily goes up to higher than 130 and more.
 

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I’m no professional mechanic but my opinion is those temps are fine, this is a largely air cooled bike and they do run hotter. Also the place the oil temp sensor is located (cylinder head area) will also give you higher temperature readings as compared to if the temp was taken at the sump. It doesn’t sound as if you’ve badly overfilled your engine with oil so in your shoes I’d just ride it. Purely my opinion....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I would call those temps normal. 221 is where I'm at most of the time on a nice day. (much warmer than 46 degrees)
On a hot day I will see 230-235 and in stop and go it will go as high as 285-290.
This has been consistent for 3 years.
 

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Yes, another temperature related question from a newbie. I like to learn, what can I say!

I picked up my 2017 Scrambler last weekend which had only done 500 miles. Previous owner says it had its 600 mile service last summer, but the business he took it to didn’t specialize in bikes by any means. Over the last week I’ve been running new gas through it and trying to ride it as much as I can.

My temps, in my opinion and compared to what everyone else is saying seems excessive. My outside temperature is around 60 degrees Fahrenheit. On short trips, the bike will be around 230 degrees Fahrenheit operating temp. Longer freeway runs are showing around 250 degrees while moving. After an hour or two of riding, I’m around 260-265 degrees Fahrenheit. Once it gets into the 260’s, it doesn’t drop down significantly by any means.

I’m riding relatively spirited with some good cruising portions inbetween. I have no idea what oil is in it, but my first guess it to switch to the bmw 15w50 semi synth to see if it helps. Not sure if there’s any correlation to oil type and overall running temp. Does this seem high for 60 degree weather? If so, I can’t imagine how the bike will do on a 100 degree day?
 

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Yes, another temperature related question from a newbie. I like to learn, what can I say!

I picked up my 2017 Scrambler last weekend which had only done 500 miles. Previous owner says it had its 600 mile service last summer, but the business he took it to didn’t specialize in bikes by any means. Over the last week I’ve been running new gas through it and trying to ride it as much as I can.

My temps, in my opinion and compared to what everyone else is saying seems excessive. My outside temperature is around 60 degrees Fahrenheit. On short trips, the bike will be around 230 degrees Fahrenheit operating temp. Longer freeway runs are showing around 250 degrees while moving. After an hour or two of riding, I’m around 260-265 degrees Fahrenheit. Once it gets into the 260’s, it doesn’t drop down significantly by any means.

I’m riding relatively spirited with some good cruising portions inbetween. I have no idea what oil is in it, but my first guess it to switch to the bmw 15w50 semi synth to see if it helps. Not sure if there’s any correlation to oil type and overall running temp. Does this seem high for 60 degree weather? If so, I can’t imagine how the bike will do on a 100 degree day?
Look I implore you please go back and read the thread. So many people seem to completely gloss over the knowledge shared.

Our bikes use a temp sensor in the case and not in the sump like is common with most bikes. Because of this the temp readout on the display seems absolutely insanely high to anyone expecting to compare the temp to what is common to see from a water cooled bike with the sensor in the sump. None of the temps you've listed seem out of bounds to me as someone that has owned the bike for several years now. I've switch away from the temp readout and only worry about it if I'm stuck in dead stopped traffic.

Worth noting is that the 2017+ bikes do have an oil temp warning that will show up as the general triangle warning light on the gauge and a thermometer displaying on the screen. If you don't see this, don't worry about temps.

(I hesitate to even bring this up, but knowledge can be useful. Our displayed temp gauge is a bit ham fisted because it will only display up to 289F/143C. Those temps are not the same as when the temp warning light comes on, the display simply refuses to show any higher numbers. We don't really know the exact temp that activates the temp warning light on the bike because of this. Either way, if your bike displays 289F/143C it does not mean it is overheating. Just get moving and the temp will slowly fall.)
 

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Look I implore you please go back and read the thread. So many people seem to completely gloss over the knowledge shared.

Our bikes use a temp sensor in the case and not in the sump like is common with most bikes. Because of this the temp readout on the display seems absolutely insanely high to anyone expecting to compare the temp to what is common to see from a water cooled bike with the sensor in the sump. None of the temps you've listed seem out of bounds to me as someone that has owned the bike for several years now. I've switch away from the temp readout and only worry about it if I'm stuck in dead stopped traffic.

Worth noting is that the 2017+ bikes do have an oil temp warning that will show up as the general triangle warning light on the gauge and a thermometer displaying on the screen. If you don't see this, don't worry about temps.

(I hesitate to even bring this up, but knowledge can be useful. Our displayed temp gauge is a bit ham fisted because it will only display up to 289F/143C. Those temps are not the same as when the temp warning light comes on, the display simply refuses to show any higher numbers. We don't really know the exact temp that activates the temp warning light on the bike because of this. Either way, if your bike displays 289F/143C it does not mean it is overheating. Just get moving and the temp will slowly fall.)
Thank you for the response! I was probably reading between the lines looking for hard numbers rather than the general message haha. For someone like me, it’s probably best to leave the clock as my default rather than the temp. Just wanting to learn as much as I can about this bike in the honeymoon phase
 

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For someone like me, it’s probably best to leave the clock as my default rather than the temp.
In my opinion everyone should always leave the trip odometer as their default display. Knowing how many miles you average on a tank of gas and how many miles you've gone on this tank will always be much more important than the time or the temp. My displays almost always show trip odo on left and current mpg on right.

Besides isn't the idea to go enjoy yourself and not fret over things like temp and time?
 

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In my opinion everyone should always leave the trip odometer as their default display. Knowing how many miles you average on a tank of gas and how many miles you've gone on this tank will always be much more important than the time or the temp. My displays almost always show trip odo on left and current mpg on right.

Besides isn't the idea to go enjoy yourself and not fret over things like temp and time?
Great point!
 

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I was wondering, when I cold start my nineT the headers are untouchable hot within a short minute. I just started the bike and wanted to quickly wipe a bit of dust of the header with the sleeve of my jacket. Silly me, my jacket is now ruined, instantly melted where I touched it.

Is this just silly me? I know for obvious reasons the exhaust system will get hot, but I can’t remember my other bikes to get that hot within such a short time after a cold start.
 
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