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Discussion Starter #1
Just a random question: Does anyone else ride with the high beams on during the day to be more visible to other drivers? Then switch to low beams (or high beams off) when it gets dark. I think I might have learned this back in 2002 or so when I was taking the California Motorcycle Safety Foundation course, I can't recall. Is this common knowledge?
 

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I only use high beam when filtering through traffic at night.

You use the term plural beams. How many do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You use the plural beams. How many do you have?
Sorry, I'm not familiar with the term 'plural beams'. Is that when the hi/lo are both on at the same time? And how many (what) do I have? Beams? Light settings? I think only two. High and low. Just FYI I have the OEM BMW Scrambler headlamp that takes a H4 halogen bulb.
 

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I never use the high beams during the day. The last thing I want to do is blind oncoming traffic and prevent them from seeing the guy riding behind me, or worse yet target fixating on my headlight and drifting into my lane. If you want to be more visible, mount two other lights to the crash bars or hand guards so that people can see 3 points of light when you approach. It's a lot easier for them to judge distance and approach speed if they are looking at a 3 dimensional view.
 

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I never use the high beams during the day. The last thing I want to do is blind oncoming traffic and prevent them from seeing the guy riding behind me, or worse yet target fixating on my headlight and drifting into my lane. If you want to be more visible, mount two other lights to the crash bars or hand guards so that people can see 3 points of light when you approach. It's a lot easier for them to judge distance and approach speed if they are looking at a 3 dimensional view.
I agree. nothing more annoying than being blinded by oncoming traffic be it car or bike.
The only thing more annoying are those headlight modulators.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just googled the question and this came up as the top result.
139522
 

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I ride with high beams during daylight hours in some situations...congested traffic, merging lanes and highway ramps...no, not a substitute for awareness and alert riding, but i think it contributes to a safety margin. The same reason I wear a bright jacket and white helmet.
 

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I ride with the low beam on during the day, but will switch to the high beam for a moment in certain situations, such as when an oncoming driver looks like they're about to turn left across my path. I will switch on the high beam as I approach, hoping that sudden increase from light to bright light grabs their attention and keeps them from turning across my lane just as I'm arriving at that spot. (I sometimes also slightly swerve back and forth 2-3 times, hoping they notice the dancing light.) It usually works, or maybe they saw me anyway. I always switch back to the low beams afterward.

If you want to ride with your high beam on during the day, you should check your state's motor vehicle laws, as some states may prohibit this. But if you feel safer riding with the high beam on during the day, even if it's illegal, it's probably worth the ticket to you if you get cited.
 

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I don't run my high beam during the day, though I'm pretty sure there's nothing blinding about the bike's single high beam during the day. On a related note, the first bike I bought had the light aimed quite low, which I thought at first just needed adjustment. But then I saw that this lets you ride at night with your high beam on all the time without blinding anyone.
 
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Just a random question: Does anyone else ride with the high beams on during the day to be more visible to other drivers? Then switch to low beams (or high beams off) when it gets dark. I think I might have learned this back in 2002 or so when I was taking the California Motorcycle Safety Foundation course, I can't recall. Is this common knowledge?
I ride with my headlight on low day and night. I bought an LED headlight for my bicycle and was really impressed with the unit so I bought two units for my moto. I have a semi full windshield and the units are tiny so I mounted them above the level of the headlight on the windshield mounts. If I see any vehicles that looks in any way like they don’t see me or aren’t looking at me I flash those lights using my high beam switch. That turns on both my headlight high beam and my auxiliary lights too.
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I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count the number of times I believe those lights have saved me from getting smashed by somebody turning out in front of me. When I flash those lights two or three times they stop in their tracks. How many times have you heard a driver say, “I’m so sorry I almost hit you ...I didn’t see you!” Drivers just don’t look for motorcycles. Be seen, or take your chances ... if you’ve been hit by someone who pulled right out in front of you, or someone cut you off on the highway and ran you into a ditch or oncoming traffic ... then you know of what I speak ... lights, horns and loud pipes help. Believe me anytime you tangle with a car or a truck ... you loose ! StayUpOn2 ....Blitz
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I ride with my headlight on low day and night. I bought an LED headlight for my bicycle and was really impressed with the unit so I bought two units for my moto. I have a semi full windshield and the units are tiny so I mounted them above the level of the headlight on the windshield mounts. If I see any vehicles t...
Drivers just don’t look for motorcycles. Be seen, or take your chances ... if you’ve been hit by someone who pulled right out in front of you, or someone cut you off on the highway and ran you into a ditch or oncoming traffic ... then you know of what I speak ... lights, horns and loud pipes help. Believe me anytime you tangle with a car or a truck ... you loose ! StayUpOn2 ....Blitz
Wow thanks for taking the time to share your set up!
 

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Riding with high beams on during the day is a time tested way to be more conspicuous. You will not come close to blinding anyone as headlights on high aren’t too bright in daylight.

Me? I don’t run the headlight on high during the day. Why? I’ve got a pair of driving lights that dim with low beam and go full bright on high. They form a nice triangle.
 

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Low beams plus locally some riders cover lights with a orange, yellow or red plastic that can be removed at night. I was initially against it but after a while noticed that in the rain it is often difficult to distinguish a bike from a car in the rear view mirror in heavy city traffic. All you see is a vast pool of light. Seeing the orange ( more visible I think) you know a bike is coming through on centre lane. Travelling on center lane not legal, but often cars are at a virtual standstill and the police seem to be pragmatic. If you stay safe they will not hassle you. Unfortunately there are many who travel at high speed between cars when traffic is moving slowly.
 

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Not sure about the legalities in US (or UK for that matter), however for reasons stated above I’ve switched to an LED highlight (Motodemic) which has low and high beams as LED. The low beam is significantly more noticeable during daytime and night time riding; I would presume this is why newer cars and bikes now come with daytime running LED headlights as standard to be more visible during the day (including the 2021 model year R NineT incidentally). I personally would avoid riding with the standard high beam during the day to avoid aggravating other road users, which could lead them to doing something unsafe / stupid, or indeed submit their dashcam footage to the police.

The best solution to get the attention of other road users in my experience is the set up proposed @GapRunr and @BlitzSchnell which is to have multiple lights. I had this on my R1200R and had several work colleagues I used to meet on my daily commute to work comment on how easy it was for me to be seen. As per @TimC ’s comment, self perseveration tactics around making yourself more visible through moving in the lane, flashing high beam (noting that in the UK this means you are giving the other car precedence - so best check local customs first!) and blipping the throttle are all good techniques to have in your repertoire.

There are some great threads on the forum about different options for R NineT headlight and auxiliary lights, as well as You Tube videos on different types of headlights and on motorcycle visibility - I’m particularly fond of this chap.



Apologies for a rather long answer to a short question; wishing you all the best from the other side of the pond.
 

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Just a random question: Does anyone else ride with the high beams on during the day to be more visible to other drivers? Then switch to low beams (or high beams off) when it gets dark. I think I might have learned this back in 2002 or so when I was taking the California Motorcycle Safety Foundation course, I can't recall. Is this common knowledge?
YES I do ride with high beam during daytime.
 

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The best solution to get the attention of other road users in my experience is the set up proposed @GapRunr and @BlitzSchnell which is to have multiple lights. I had this on my R1200R and had several work colleagues I used to meet on my daily commute to work comment on how easy it was for me to be seen. As per @TimC ’s comment, self perseveration tactics around making yourself more visible through moving in the lane, flashing high beam (noting that in the UK this means you are giving the other car precedence - so best check local customs first!) and blipping the throttle are all good techniques to have in your repertoire.

There are some great threads on the forum about different options for R NineT headlight and auxiliary lights, as well as You Tube videos on different types of headlights and on motorcycle visibility - I’m particularly fond of this chap.
Thanks for the mention. I should note I don't flash my high beam to oncoming drivers who I think may turn across my lane. I turn the high beam on until I'm sure they see me, or until I'm past them. Flashing the high beam would give them the wrong idea, if they even know what that signal means. (Most drivers here in the US don't.)

Also, I love FortNine's videos. That guy is great!
 

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Riding with any aids; such as high beam, extra led lights or a fluor vest.. are all "appearance safety"..

People actualy have to look in order to see you; and they will see you.. even if you have a single dipped beam on going from the idea that they are actualy looking for a bike.

Most people are not "bike" minded when scanning an intersection for traffic before driving on / passing.
You and your bike are a smaller object than for example a car and you are "static" and small when coming towards other road users.

If you see a car next to the road that is about to pull onto the road; make sure you make yourself visible by "moving".. this can be moving a bit to the left/right.. or a small wiggle. As long as you are not a "static" object.

Other people in the posts above say riding with high beam gets more attention; this is false. You only blind people and create a dark spot in their vision because they will look away from your beam and cause even more danger for the other traffic users behind / around you. id also say by this the "national agenda of motorcycle safety" is oudated / bullcrap.

I never forget here in the Netherlands; a bright yellow ambulance with stripes/sirens/lamps on got hit by a car because the person did not see the ambulance.. if people do not look; they will not see you.

Edit;

It is your duty as biker to be smarter than other road users.. if you see a car or do not trust the situation; let off the throttle and lower your speed. Accidents happen because someone is not able to react to the fault of others
 

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In Italy having the high beam on when crossing other vehicles is not permitted. I also think that the first result you may encounter with such a strategy is to piss off drivers and cause unpleasant reactions.
Chris said it right it's a perception, expectation issue, many drivers do not look for else than a car, so they may really not see a motorbike.

It is your duty as biker to be smarter than other road users.. if you see a car or do not trust the situation; let off the throttle and lower your speed. Accidents happen because someone is not able to react to the fault of others
This is really what saves you, do not pretend to be right, just avoid to have to explain it to somebody...

Additionally, I agree that adding supplementary lights may help, showing at least from a front view a triangle, that is a bit more visible that a single headlight.
 

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Thanks for the mention. I should note I don't flash my high beam to oncoming drivers who I think may turn across my lane. I turn the high beam on until I'm sure they see me, or until I'm past them. Flashing the high beam would give them the wrong idea, if they even know what that signal means. (Most drivers here in the US don't.)

Also, I love FortNine's videos. That guy is great!
Your right Tim, most in the USA don’t know what flashing lights mean. Problem is ..the meaning changes from country to country. In the USA NOTHING signals permission to cut in front of traffic that has “right of way”, especially at night when you can’t see the driver. Check out the latest drivers course training at any Department of Public Safety in the USA. There are strict rules of “right of way” and no Catch22 that relieves you of that responsibility. Who knows, someone may have just bumped the lever light switch accidentally. In many countries flashing lights means beware I’m approaching at greater speed than you and I’m coming around you, stay to the right until I’m past, as is on the Audubon in Germany. My habit is, as I approach any situation involving cross traffic carefully examine where that cross traffic might come from, watch the potential danger carefully, if you feel they have not seen you then flash them, with the right foot and hand prepared to do an emergency stop back down slightly on the throttle until your past any potential problem. Don’t get caught unprepared it can get you hurt or worse. If you’re watching carefully you can often stop from hitting them much more easily than they can stop from hitting you but you have to be prepared. My attitude is .. Be Seen ! Flash lights, honk horn (politely) rev engine for muffler effect.... hell, stand up on the pegs and wave. BE SEEN and be alert to those who just simply aren’t looking for motorcycles. It WILL save you from injury or death. I’m 71 now with over 50 years on bikes and I have one bad accident to live with and frankly it was because I was mentally distracted at the wrong moment and I expected traffic to behave as I would ... WRONG ! Pay close attention when in traffic, assume nothing, beware of everything, caution is always the proper mind set. Above all else .. Be Seen .. and Be Safe ! StayUpOn2 HaveFun .....Blitz
CU.....I’m going for a ride, time to cruz amigos !
 
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