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I just made 4000km in 9 day tour in different type of roads. With stock scrambler, I don't see an issue with seat or comfort. Tires were Karoo 3. Used max 160 kmph. Only thing I am changing now is Karoo 3 to karoo street. Tires finished after 11k.
 

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I've done a couple of 400 mile days on my Urban with the stock saddle, wearing bicycle shorts, and I was absolutely knackered at the end of the day. Depending on your speeds, a windshield would be a welcome addition. Make sure to wear ear plugs as well. That will also make a big difference in your level of exhaustion.
Before I had my touring bike I did a multi-day tour round Wales last year. Biggest day was 220 miles, and felt OK at the end.

[1] Padded Cycling shorts - these definitely help a lot.
[2] Even a small Rizoma fly screen helps.
[3] Probably biggest difference for me was my helmet - I've worn an AGV K5 S for a long time and didn't realise how aerodynamic this is until I recently bought a more retro looking Arai Rapide.
I really feel the wind force wearing the Arai compared to the AGV.
ARAI:

AGV:
 

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Helmets sure do make a huge difference! Love my Shoei after battling with more styled offerings from Bell, and a couple of older Arai helmets.
 

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No chance for me on the stock seat. I'm sore after 100 miles. Just did the NC500 a month back, many painful days. Ibuprofen helped. I just bought an Airhawk seat cushion to remedy this and will be using it on my tour of Snowdonia, Peak District, Yorkshire Dales and Lake District in a few days. Results TBC!
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Before I had my touring bike I did a multi-day tour round Wales last year. Biggest day was 220 miles, and felt OK at the end.

[1] Padded Cycling shorts - these definitely help a lot.
[2] Even a small Rizoma fly screen helps.
[3] Probably biggest difference for me was my helmet - I've worn an AGV K5 S for a long time and didn't realise how aerodynamic this is until I recently bought a more retro looking Arai Rapide.
I really feel the wind force wearing the Arai compared to the AGV.
ARAI:

AGV:
I agree with the helmet. I recently changed from an old Schuberth C2 to a BMW Carbon System 7 and there is a huge difference :)
 

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Discussion Starter #29
OK, so to answer my own question and for the benefit of anyone else who is unsure about the tourability of these fabulous motorbikes, the answer is a resounding YES, get out there! Decent helmet, good earplugs (essential), bar risers (makes a big difference for me but I'm a shortarse), some type of screen and cycle shorts, which may or may not have made the difference but I wore them just in case. 150 miles between stops was fine, biggest thing was choosing A roads rather than motorways to keep the interest up. The A68 from Darlington to Edinburgh is recommended. Is there anything that this bike can't do? 😁
 

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I have a 18 Urban wirh a solo mustang seat with a Amphibious air seat and sheep skin cover. I just completed a 3000 mile 7 day trip with several back to back 600 mile day rides. Butt was a bit tired at end of day but no real issues.
135822
135823
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I have a 18 Urban wirh a solo mustang seat with a Amphibious air seat and sheep skin cover. I just completed a 3000 mile 7 day trip with several back to back 600 mile day rides. Butt was a bit tired at end of day but no real issues. View attachment 135822 View attachment 135823
Wow, 600 mile days sounds pretty hard core. I can imagine 500 miles but 600? Ouchy ouch!
 

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Wow, 600 mile days sounds pretty hard core. I can imagine 500 miles but 600? Ouchy ouch!
I've done a few 600-mile days on my Honda VFR, but I think most of those days were spent on interstates. Even so, I don't think I'd want to string 2-3 days of them together. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I've done a few 600-mile days on my Honda VFR, but I think most of those days were spent on interstates. Even so, I don't think I'd want to string 2-3 days of them together. :(
i know what you mean. I've had some serious tourers (including VFR750 and VFR800) and they munched the motorway miles but they had proper screens etc. I had a K1200GT for a while that would run all day without even breaking a sweat. The R9T is not that kind of beastie! To be able to link 400 mile days on a bike like an R9T and have the fun factor in between is awesome (to Americanise it). Love this bike 😁 :love:
 

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I'm thinking of riding up to the cairngorms, about 430 miles of A roads and motorway. Is this reasonable in one day or are my eyes bigger than my arse
padding?
Let's just say, your ass won't love you - but your head will.
In miles, I think that is a lot on an R nine T. (Not so on a GS)

The only other suggestion I would offer, is that you have as much sex as you can leading up to the trip. Because after that seat crushes the nerves around your nuts, you will likely not be having sex ever again.
GOOD LUCK
 

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I'm thinking of riding up to the cairngorms, about 430 miles of A roads and motorway. Is this reasonable in one day or are my eyes bigger than my arse
padding?
I've done 535 miles on a Urban with a stock setup a few times so I say go for it. By way of reference I'm a 60 something grandpa with a pension for riding.

Also, my daughter and I rode 1400 miles along the Oregon/Washington coast and then across to Mount Rainer and Saint Helens in three days while she rode a RnineT classic. No complaints from her other than "dad your an ass, don't embarrass me".

What's that running company say, "JUST DO IT!"
 

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Take two Ibuprofen before the ride starts, wear cycle shorts and ear plugs, and stay hydrated.
Hello All,
At the risk of sounding like the pro from Dover (actually I live in the States) and with what I hope is viewed as my attempt to pass on some advise that has been passed to me here are some long distance tips.
I am a member of two organizations (maybe not still ) the MERA (Motorcycle Endurance Riders Association) and the IBA (Iron Butt Association), My first ride with one of these clubs was about 1987 or so. The shortest events are 12 hours and would entail 500 or 600 miles. The longest of the events last 11 days and can end up being 12,000 + miles.
First thing to say is this is not about guts or riding crazy and it's not about motorbikes with high top-ends nor bikes horse power (my wife won two of the 12 hr events on a 250cc Ninja) What it is about is planning, gear, health management (think food types and H20). What it's really about is attitude and overall mind set.
Planning: know your route avoid high winds (that will wear you out fast) and places that tend to get hot/wet or full of traffic. To this end it has a lot to do with what time you move thru a given location.
Gear: A real good seat ! ( most motorbike seats are made to be comfortable when you test them out on the showroom floor.) OEM seats are often too soft. Riding suits here I look for versatility and can I get it open to change what I have under it or use a restroom. I wear a 1 piece fabric suit (aerostitch) from a firm called Riders Warehouse. This suit has good Armour, ballistic at the hit spots and can be on and off in seconds. As undergarments I use things from a company called LD Comfort (Long Distance Comfort) this stuff wicks away moisture will keep you cool when it's hot and warm when it's not. It also rolls up in a neet bundle so it packs well so you can have a change or two. I look for boots that are more toward the adventure market rather than road racing (when you are tired it is very easy to put a foot wrong and sprain and ankle). Gloves I use two types 1 for cold (more on this later) 1 for warm. This said I do not sacrifice safety . Helmet. I prefer a flip up type (Shoei, HJC etc) because it lets me drink and eat from a tank bag with little effort. It also will let you have a clear look at your GPS or a Map when it's raining or dark and you are stopped along the road.
Taking care of your body (health): I stay away from energy drinks and coffee/tea . I drink lots of water but if I need some type of hydration I'll go with something like Gatorade but I Do Not Drink it Straight ! if you do it will make you thirsty fill you with way to many chemicals and at least for me tend to upset my digestive tract. I also stay away fast food in fact even lots of food (I try to stay at about 2500 cals a day) remember a good meal makes you look for a place for a nap. I would also stay away from medications both Over the counter and by script. These are hard on the body and?or will screw up your riding and when you stop taking them you often feel far worse.
Attitude: This is the one thing that is totally about how YOU deal with the ride, where you put your mind and thoughts. Now for me it takes about 100 miles before I can even get comfortable, get my mind in the right place and loosen up. I do enjoy a blast up the winding coast road here in Northern California and for that I'm loose and enjoy the 50 mile run but then speed can be a good pain killer . I well know long distance rider once reminded me that distance is a human invention. How far is far is how far you think it is. So if you think that 200 miles is a long way you will be getting worn out at 180 miles. If 1000 miles is far you will be wondering how you have ridden 300 miles and aren't really tired.
Cheers all, hope this helps some of you and was not too presumptuous of me
 

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@rich46 Above all, very interesting set of advice! Thanks!

But let me add one small point. I see some sense of competition in what you write there, I fully respect your point of view, mine is slightly different: rather than distance, I think of time. So I feel much more satisfied having run on a curly road for hours, maybe at very low average speed and done just a few hundreds of Kms, rather than having run full throttle on a straight highway.The sense of this shall be: I like riding so much, that I want to feel as much comfortable as possible to stay seated on my bike the longest.

Cheers!!!

A.
 

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I'm thinking of riding up to the cairngorms, about 430 miles of A roads and motorway. Is this reasonable in one day or are my eyes bigger than my arse
padding?
Another technique that’s helped me extend my riding range is keeping more weight on the foot pegs by lifting my butt a little and simultaneously squeezing the tank with my inner thighs and leaning forward just slightly.
this lessens the pressure on the backside and let’s your legs support your upper body. Give it a try. Drift.
 

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I'm thinking of riding up to the cairngorms, about 430 miles of A roads and motorway. Is this reasonable in one day or are my eyes bigger than my arse
padding?
As GapRunr says, if you are not used to a 400 mile day, it might be hard first time.
I have done it several times on my Urban and the saver of my butt is the Air Hawk pad - I have the dual sport version, because I originally bought it for my Himialayan,
but there are several versions and you just pick the one you think will work.

You need very little air in it. Too much and it is like sitting on a ball, but if you just barely blow it up, it adds a lot of comfort. While not the most beautiful addition to the bike, it is ok, and easily removable.

Another factor to consider is how many miles you have on the bike. I am up to 4300 miles and the rear suspension is finally loosening up enough to not rattle my spine on a bridge expansion joint or large tar strip.

Next year (would have been this year if not for covid) I plan to ride about 10K miles via southern US states and end up in Montana for the BMWMOA rally. I don't have any reservations on taking the trip!
 

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@rich46 Above all, very interesting set of advice! Thanks!

But let me add one small point. I see some sense of competition in what you write there, I fully respect your point of view, mine is slightly different: rather than distance, I think of time. So I feel much more satisfied having run on a curly road for hours, maybe at very low average speed and done just a few hundreds of Kms, rather than having run full throttle on a straight highway.The sense of this shall be: I like riding so much, that I want to feel as much comfortable as possible to stay seated on my bike the longest.

Cheers!!!

A.
Alligator, Just a little FYI on those events. They are not just blasts across the country. Competitive yes in deed but what happens is each rider is given a long list of locations (all kinds of roads, thru state and national parks and everything from multi lane highways to dirt paths) too many locations for the rider to be able to hit them all. The harder they are to get to the higher the points you get for going. The way the winning is done is by who gets the most points. What a rider does to get points is to take a picture, answer a question about the place, or get a sale ticket with time and date. After over 25 years of doing these events what I'll say is because of them I gone place and seen things I would never have on my own as a tourist.
 
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