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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2020 Pure's tires are shot and need to be replaced. I hate paying for on-bike tire changes, due to both the expense and (usually) the week's wait in a local shop. Since both tires need to be done, I'm trying to find a way to safety lift the bike off the ground without investing in the very expensive Bursig center lift stand I know some people have. Lifting the whole bike off the ground is going to be a super rare occurrence for me, so it's just not worth the investment.

I bought used Becker Technik lifter stand from another forum member recently, but let's set that aside for now.

I ordered a rear paddock stand for my R9T several weeks ago, and it's due to arrive this Saturday. I do not have a front paddock or fork stand, and I'm not planning to buy one.

My idea is to use the rear paddock stand to get the rear wheel off the ground, then use my automotive floor jack under the engine to lift the front wheel off the ground. I would put a length of 2x4 between the floor jack and the bike, positioning the 2x4 across the engine and exhaust pipes, which should keep the bike from wobbling in either direction.

As for the Becker lifter stand, I'm unwilling to trust using that and the rear paddock stand to lift the whole bike off the ground. If I were only doing the front tire I'd be fine with just using the Becker stand, which I'll do for future front tire changes.

Why all this? So I can take the wheels to a shop where they can do loose wheel tire changes while you wait. But the only shop I know that does that is 150 miles away. I hate to make two trips, so I'm asking for input on whether lifting my R9T this way can be done safely.

I'm open to other ideas, too, as I'm just hoping to figure out a way to lift the bike safely. I'll do the wheels one at a time if I have to, but I'm hoping this will work.

Thanks in advance for any feedback!
 

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2016 RNineT Classic
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Tim, that sounds like a solid plan. I’d probably have someone to assist, just in case. The underbody is pretty flat, so anything like a 2x4, a flat piece of wood or else works. I used a cpl of bricks once, and the last 1/4 inch was a cutting board from the kitchen. You won’t need much elevation to roll the wheels out.
 

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2017 Pure
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Tim, have you considered the PitBull stand for front and rear? In particular, IIRC you are planning on working on the forks of your 9T, PitBull makes a front stand that will lift your bike by the lower triple clamp, not only getting the front wheel off the ground, but also allowing you to remove the front fork tubes to swap springs and the like. Just a thought.

Also, I'd check to make sure whichever shop you decide to go with for the tire swap, can do it while you wait. That had been my experience years ago, but not this last week. Every shop I talked to said I'd have to leave the wheels and tires, and it would be two days before they could get to them. Maybe it's a Spring thing, with everyone getting their bikes out now that we have warmer weather, and bringing their bikes in for service. But I'd check first.

Best,
-Tim
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Norbi -- Thanks for the feedback and info!

@Timmyjoe -- I have considered the front stand, and maybe at some point I'll get one. For now I'll try this without one, but it is a good thought. Thanks!

Also, I checked with the local Big 4 (and Aprilia) dealer shop, where I've had tires replaced before, and where I had my old VFR serviced a few times. I was hoping same day or maybe even a 24-48 hour turnaround, but they said a week. Sorry, but that's just unacceptable to replace tires on a couple loose wheels in my opinion. Instead I'll probably take the wheels to the Iron Pony in Westerville, OH (a Columbus suburb). I've had while-you-wait tire changes on loose wheels done there several times over the years.
 

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Here is the Double Pitbull Stand setup. The front uses the stem hole, so the front wheel and the forks can be removed.

Alternatively, you can buy a couple of tire irons and change your own tires. It's technique more than strength, and the more you do it the easier it gets. I've changed my own a couple of dozen times over the years.



143926
 

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Tim,
I think your plan should work fine, I did something very similar when I replaced the front suspension on my R nine T. The only thing I did different was I put an "eye" bolt into one of the rafter studs in my garage and then used a ratchet strap around the handle bars and up to the eye bolt. This was just to keep the bike from getting knocked over while sitting on the hydraulic jack. You aren't lifting anything with the strap and the eye bolt, just keeping the bike from moving to the side if it gets knocked for any reason. In this photo I didn't remove the rear wheel, but I certainly could have if I had needed to. In this photo you can just see the blue ratchet strap going from the handle bars to the ceiling. Again, the ratchet strap isn't actually holding any weight, but probably could if the bike got knocked off the jack. Make sure the eye bolt is screwed into a rafter stud and not just through the drywall if you have a finished garage ceiling. It's probably not necessary, but gave me some peace of mind as an added layer of safety.

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Hope this helps and good luck with your endeavors.
Chris
 

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Oh yeah, and of course, make sure the eyebolt is directly above the handle bars so it doesn't actually pull the bike off the jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Tim,
I think your plan should work fine, I did something very similar when I replaced the front suspension on my R nine T. The only thing I did different was I put an "eye" bolt into one of the rafter studs in my garage and then used a ratchet strap around the handle bars and up to the eye bolt. This was just to keep the bike from getting knocked over while sitting on the hydraulic jack. You aren't lifting anything with the strap and the eye bolt, just keeping the bike from moving to the side if it gets knocked for any reason. In this photo I didn't remove the rear wheel, but I certainly could have if I had needed to. In this photo you can just see the blue ratchet strap going from the handle bars to the ceiling. Again, the ratchet strap isn't actually holding any weight, but probably could if the bike got knocked off the jack. Make sure the eye bolt is screwed into a rafter stud and not just through the drywall if you have a finished garage ceiling. It's probably not necessary, but gave me some peace of mind as an added layer of safety.

Hope this helps and good luck with your endeavors.
Chris
Excellent! Thanks very much for that information and photo. This is pretty much exactly what I was picturing in my head. I wasn't really thinking of the ratchet strap, but that's a great idea - even just for some peace of mind as you said. I don't have rafters and I'm not too keen on drilling into the ceiling, but I could use a stud finder to find a ceiling joist. Or I could position the bike under one of the garage door rails and hang the strap from that.

Between the 2x4 across the bottom of the bike's engine case and the pipes, hopefully it will be quite steady. Even so, I'll probably slightly loosen the bolts for the wheels before they leave the ground, just to keep from putting too much torque on the bike while it's rigged up like that.

Thanks again @wyoplinker and everyone! (y)
 

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As for the Becker lifter stand, I'm unwilling to trust using that and the rear paddock stand to lift the whole bike off the ground.
I would actually prefer the Becker stand over a jack under the sump.
I have the Becker stand, and utilising a protruding crash bobbin at the rear, raise the paralever on a vehicle axle stand.
Yes you have to be careful, so do what feels most comfortable for you. 👌
 
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Hey Tim, ever heard of a Bursig lift ? It’s German like the bike …. Google it ! There’s many videos, many reviews to watch. I have one and I rate it 5 stars. If you get others interested maybe you can get a group buy discount. If that sounds good PM me and I’ll tell you all about it. ……Blitz Watch the videos, it’s actually as easy as it looks.
 

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Hey Tim, ever heard of a Bursig lift ? It’s German like the bike …. Google it ! There’s many videos, many reviews to watch. I have one and I rate it 5 stars. If you get others interested maybe you can get a group buy discount. If that sounds good PM me and I’ll tell you all about it. ……Blitz Watch the videos, it’s actually as easy as it looks.
Agreed. I have the Bursig stand and you can just about dismantle the entire bike while it's on it.
 

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A jack under the engine with a block of wood (in combination with a rear paddock stand or centre stand) is a solid method for lifting boxers, provided you avoid the oil filter. Been used to great effect on my dad's R1100S, my water-cooled R1200GS and my previous R9T.
 

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Here is the Double Pitbull Stand setup. The front uses the stem hole, so the front wheel and the forks can be removed.

Alternatively, you can buy a couple of tire irons and change your own tires. It's technique more than strength, and the more you do it the easier it gets. I've changed my own a couple of dozen times over the years.



View attachment 143926
Those pit stands are swell…for the pits …or a big open garage like you have in that pict GapRunr, where there’s plenty of room to work around the bike. I work in a shoe box compared that shop. I like the Bursig because it’s on dolly swivel wheels and can be maneuvered in any direction I push it ..by my self ..while still elevated off the deck. No mount and remount necessary to change positions. I can sit in my roll around stool and guide the bike to any place I need it ..very easily with both wheels completely off the deck. I can do a 360° turn around with out getting up. The stand quickly attaches to the frame not the wheels or axils. The leverage arm on the lift makes it easy to pick up the entire bike with one hand. Doesn’t that make more sense if your working on the wheels or tires, brakes, forks, final drive or anything related. Nothing is in your way. Make sense ? Of course it makes sense… it’s German. Check out the YouTube videos, you’ll see what I’m talking about. A pit stand is purposeful too, quick in, gas’s up, quick out. I needed something that would allow me to manuver 500 pounds like it was 50 and this stand gets 5 stars for my tiny shop. Love it !
 

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Or, @TimC to complete the confusion of options, you could also get one of these:

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… and I’m pretty certain, equipped with just some tools you could just ride all those 150 mls, take the front (first) and back (later, after the front is re-installed) off right there at the tire shop, have no issues and leave some major impression with the guys... Having that solution, for me, is so convenient, for cleaning purposes or working on the bike, saving space in the garage, saving the side-stand, having weight off during longer no-use periods etc.
Plus, it also lowers the center of gravity while riding, how cool is that?
 

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Pit Bull stands and haven't looked back. My only regret is not getting the front stand that lifts by the triple clamps or headstock which I am going to purchase soon. The reason being it is so much safer and easier to remove forks with that lift.
Yes I have supported the bike from the skid plate and have had it tied off to the rafters but it really made my gut hurt to think of something going wrong and the bike tipping over. It reminded me of doing a roadside repair real quick and not so safe just so you could get rolling again and off the road.
 

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Great post with great info! definately some interesting/creative ideas of lifting the 9T. I have always worried about jacking up the bike by the engine case, but looks like it's very safe to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
@BlitzSchnell -- I like the idea and design of the Bursig stand, but not the cost. Thankfully I have a decent amount of space in our garage to work on my motorcycle!

@FSEngineer -- Thanks for the additional reassurance my idea holds water! :)

@Norbi -- I didn't think I'd really miss the centerstand from my VFR 800. It came in handy for servicing the bike and chain maintenance. I also used to ride down to the Iron Pony with a tire iron strapped to the rear seat (under my emergency bag/toolkit, pop the rear wheel off in the side parking lot outside the service area, then just carry my rear wheel in to have the tire replaced. Loved doing that. I've not really considered a centerstand for my R9T, partly because of the cost, but also because I just don't want to add one. But in situations like this it totally makes sense, just like it did on my VFR. For front wheel removal, I used to put the VFR on its centerstand, and stick a small piece of 2x4 between the floor jack's pad and the header pipes under the bike (exposed between the side fairings). I'd jack up the bike just enough to get the rear wheel on the ground and the front wheel about half an inch off the ground. Worked great!

And @GapRunr -- That is definitely a good one, but kind of sad too, ya know?
 
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