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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone ride both? How’s the difference comfort/performance wise. I’m also somewhat tickling the idea of a panigale v2 but I know that’s an entirely different category. Still, would be cool to hear from you guys regarding how they match up.
 

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The Monster is far more aggressive in riding position and everything else... I own 3 Duc's and I always find myself going that tad harder or faster on them. In my opinion they are just not designed to a(hold a steady speed) b(cruise around and enjoy the scenery) .... I have fairly long legs and the riding position is just not as easy as on the Rnine T. Handling is sharper. More pressure on your wrists. Very throttle happy. They want to go fast.
just my 2 cents ;)
 

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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #3
The Monster is far more aggressive in riding position and everything else... I own 3 Duc's and I always find myself going that tad harder or faster on them. In my opinion they are just not designed to a(hold a steady speed) b(cruise around and enjoy the scenery) .... I have fairly long legs and the riding position is just not as easy as on the Rnine T. Handling is sharper. More pressure on your wrists. Very throttle happy. They want to go fast.
just my 2 cents ;)
nice. Yeah i might be looking into a monster as my next ride.Would you say something like the 1200s is way way more torquing/faster than the nine t?
 

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You might as well look at the S1000R, which is the naked version of the RR. It is an amazing bike with a steep learning curve.
 

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Then ya might as well through in the S1000XR, stupid fast with comfort to boot. Or go completely nuts and go for the new M1000RR in carbon fiber, that bike is insane but in a very good way if ya have the coin.
 

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The ergonomics seem to be fairly similar. Less knee flexion on the ninet but nearly identical otherwise. Add a Rizoma MA011 bar and the ninet is far more leaned forward and bent over.
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I was going to test ride a Monster 1200s before going with the NineT - but didn't - mainly because I knew that i'd be pulling wheelies everywhere on the Monster and I wanted to ride more sensibly this time aound. I think the Monster would encourage more silly behaviour and I don't trust my self control.
 

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Had a Monster for three days; it didn’t take. I’ve had my Classic for two years (22k miles) and love it.

I especially like the “just get on and ride it” aspect of the shaft and boxer.
 

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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #10
Had a Monster for three days; it didn’t take. I’ve had my Classic for two years (22k miles) and love it.

I especially like the “just get on and ride it” aspect of the shaft and boxer.
What didn’t you dig about the monster?
 

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I have a 2016 Classic and recently purchased a 2019 Monster 1200 S. I really wanted something with more performance, tech, and high spec components and the Monster really fit the bill. It has amazing ohlins suspension, brembo M50 monoblocks, TFT display with rider modes, lean sensitive traction control and abs, wheel control, 147hp with stonking performance. And it's really a gorgeous bike to look at. I had considered upgrading the suspension on the 9T, but instead of sinking a lot more money into that bike, I figured it was better spent on the Monster (also got a great deal on a brand new year old model when sales were pretty slow because of the pandemic). Overall it's a more complete bike, it handles like a dream, and I find myself pushing it harder and harder. It's by no means a 'monster' if you don't want it to be, it's perfectly docile and tractable around town. Only gripes so far is the heat from the exhaust on the right side under my thigh, warm but not unbearable on warmer days, and it feels a bit taller than the 9T due to a taller tank (and the 9T's lower center of gravity). The seat is firm and bend in the knees a bit more than the 9T. The stock seat is also slippery and I end up sliding forward too easily during braking, which I solved by getting the alcantara seat from the Anniversario model. I've yet to take it on a long trip (I could do 250 mi days on my 9T, uncomfortable but doable).
 

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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #12
I have a 2016 Classic and recently purchased a 2019 Monster 1200 S. I really wanted something with more performance, tech, and high spec components and the Monster really fit the bill. It has amazing ohlins suspension, brembo M50 monoblocks, TFT display with rider modes, lean sensitive traction control and abs, wheel control, 147hp with stonking performance. And it's really a gorgeous bike to look at. I had considered upgrading the suspension on the 9T, but instead of sinking a lot more money into that bike, I figured it was better spent on the Monster (also got a great deal on a brand new year old model when sales were pretty slow because of the pandemic). Overall it's a more complete bike, it handles like a dream, and I find myself pushing it harder and harder. It's by no means a 'monster' if you don't want it to be, it's perfectly docile and tractable around town. Only gripes so far is the heat from the exhaust on the right side under my thigh, warm but not unbearable on warmer days, and it feels a bit taller than the 9T due to a taller tank (and the 9T's lower center of gravity). The seat is firm and bend in the knees a bit more than the 9T. The stock seat is also slippery and I end up sliding forward too easily during braking, which I solved by getting the alcantara seat from the Anniversario model. I've yet to take it on a long trip (I could do 250 mi days on my 9T, uncomfortable but doable).

this was just the kind of comparison I was looking for.Is the power from the 1200s totally night and day different from the nine t? Or are the comparable somewhat? I’m about to pull a trigger on a 17’1200s and really am looking forward to having amore performance oriented machine under me.
And yeah Ducati’s seem to be known for their heaaaat which is kind of a bummer since I live in a year-round hot hot city :/
 

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If you are looking for that type of bike, you should seriously consider the BMW S1000R. The single R is a naked bike and more comparable to the 1200S. I have one and it is absolute beast of a bike.
 

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What didn’t you dig about the monster?
Hmm. I cannot tell you why, exactly, without going into a campfire story. I put on 900-1100 miles a month (double that when my wife is gone) since I do not have a car and I do not play hoops or poker. My bike in our local mountains is my entertainment.

Ducati Backstory: The Duc was what I wanted for years and finally attained. I loved walking up to the Monster and hearing it scream "NAKED!" I want to see my engine, and the Duc was just tubes lovingly wrapped around the engine.

Leg-over, and I was on my toes or leaning... which didn't bother me. The seat was okay, just okay; which was okay. Handlebars were not a perfect fit for my reach but, shrug Ducati!

The "test ride" was quite disappointing; I think my expectations were too high. The clutch was a bear, but rumor has it this isn't an issue anymore. Torque was delivered later than I liked, and torque is more important than HP for 80% of my riding day-to-day. After you got up on the torque, the bike was lovely and lively. It makes wonderful mechanical noises like a naked should.

I am, at most, a 7/10 rider and the Monster could play there without any drama. The Duc delivered handling above my abilities to tax it.

But ¡Ducati!, so I bought the bike.

Coming back into town after my first long ride, I rolled up to a red light. It turned green, as traffic signals will (eventually) do, and the Duc dies. Swearing. Drama. Swearing: Angry, pistol-packing pickup truck drivers honking a symphony of horns behind me.

I paid $150 to get the bike off of the road shoulder and into the shop. The Duc was a lightly used bike imported by a GI without a warranty. I paid for two Ducati premium service hours ($20 more an hour than other bikes) to find out some PJ1 killed the kickstand ignition kill switch ... and I had to mention it before they considered it. (I had been thinking about it for two days)

120 miles and I had already spent $400 on towing and repairs.

It just didn't live up to my expectations. I now had visions of the bike dying on a mountain road, 120-miles from a bike shop. On the fourth day, doG created Katrina and it was not good: the Duc was totaled while in my garage. I bought a 'Zuki Bandit and learned to love it (mostly) over the next 12 years.

BMW. I first noticed the Classic R9T in a 2012 rumor report. I never cared for BMW style - at all - but I do like a good drive shaft design. Except for the USA homologation crap, BMW delivered a bike that checked most of my personal style boxes with the original R9T. I think the Classic is (mostly) gorgeous. (Hate the tail: Love the bike) Most bikes today use plastic to hide ugly stuff around the engine, but there is no hiding the R9T jugs. So great.

Speaking to things I do not like: I do not like or trust motorcycle gas gauges and computers; the R9T did not have the former and seemed to have fewer of the latter. I do not like radiators. The Triumph hides it pretty well, but it is still a service item I'd rather live without. The R9T isn't water-cooled.

Leg-over, the bike's height is perfect for me; I'm flat-footed at the lights. The saddle is lovely with a good surface, though an acquired taste for long rides. I can sit on it for about 14 hours if I take breaks while refueling but it took some work building the callouses on my cheeks. Handlebars are not perfect for me, a bit out there into the other lanes, but not awful.

Clutch and fueling are perfect for my use. While the torque isn't as good as my Triumph, it still comes on plenty, soon, and builds far longer than the Triumph. I easily hit a ton when passing, when necessary. The front tire will rise-up on command and the rear will paint the appropriate amount of rubber onto the road when aggressive and traction control is off. Don't concern yourself, the tire will not die of old age.

There is a feeling of being well planted on the road with this R9T, better than I would expect on a bike under 500 lbs. It feels like thick fluid on most rides. In the curves, both I and the BMW are playing around 7/10ths; the bike being a bit better than me. I look, it goes. I can play with different physics and the BMW complies as one would expect. There is a bit of torque-hop and excessive engine brake on the earlier manufacturer ECU tunes but that seems sorted now. Lovely.

Summary:
The Monster - it is an exquisite naked and fits well in any timeline. However, it gave me less joy, less reliability, and was more expensive to repair. Mine was no fun around town... at all.

R9T - A custom classic with reliability and performance. I've had no repairs (squeeze wood) other than tires in 22k miles. No chain lube. No radiator. No drama. No swearing. It fits me and my riding needs (almost) perfectly. AND I can push >60mpg up in the mountains if I find the gas stations are shuttered.
 

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this was just the kind of comparison I was looking for.Is the power from the 1200s totally night and day different from the nine t? Or are the comparable somewhat? I’m about to pull a trigger on a 17’1200s and really am looking forward to having amore performance oriented machine under me.
And yeah Ducati’s seem to be known for their heaaaat which is kind of a bummer since I live in a year-round hot hot city :/
the power is quite substantial, torque is very abundant and i've only been keeping the revs below 6k for break in. i hear it also pulls very hard all the way up to the 9.5k or so redline. took it on my favorite canyon road this past weekend and it definitely felt stronger everywhere. if you're looking for a more performance oriented machine, i would say you won't be disappointed. it also oozes style without being dated or obnoxious (i crossed shopped a super duke 1290 r but could not get over the design).
 

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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
the power is quite substantial, torque is very abundant and i've only been keeping the revs below 6k for break in. i hear it also pulls very hard all the way up to the 9.5k or so redline. took it on my favorite canyon road this past weekend and it definitely felt stronger everywhere. if you're looking for a more performance oriented machine, i would say you won't be disappointed. it also oozes style without being dated or obnoxious (i crossed shopped a super duke 1290 r but could not get over the design).
Would you say the handling and performance are night and day different or just somewhat comparable. Meaning should I expect similar throttle response from the monster compared to the nine t?
And as for the quick shifter on the monster, I’m actually really curious to know if this works well or if its quirks make it function just sometimes lol. In any case I’m glad you enjoy yours. I’m pretty stoked to get mine and if the right boxes are ticked it should be rather soon.

still want a sweet nine t in the stable eventually, though. I’m honestly in love with its aesthetic. I don’t think any bike comes close to them, especially when modified right; Just my opinion. The monster is still a looker and I’m sure in person (haven’t been exposed much to it in real life, just in passing glances on the street) it looks much nicer.

Cheers to some fun and safe riding. Thanks for your input :)
 

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2017 R nineT Classic
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Roland Sands tossed out a lot of BMW's design (except the USA homologation crap) and delivered a bike that checked most of my personal style boxes.
I'm not really sure what this is in reference to. Roland Sands had nothing to do with the design of the R nineT. He was given a production R nineT and told to do whatever he wanted to it and came up with the Concept 90 as one of the first wave of BMW funded customs. Its possible that interest in that bike led to the later release of the Racer, but he had nothing to do with design.

The head of the BMW Heritage team named is named Roland Stocker though and he's been visible in quite of few of BMW's promotional stuff behind the R nineT and R18. Is that possibly who you mean?
 

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I'll presume you are correct and delete the sentence.

I'm not really sure what this is in reference to. Roland Sands had nothing to do with the design of the R nineT. He was given a production R nineT and told to do whatever he wanted to it and came up with the Concept 90 as one of the first wave of BMW funded customs. Its possible that interest in that bike led to the later release of the Racer, but he had nothing to do with design.

The head of the BMW Heritage team named is named Roland Stocker though and he's been visible in quite of few of BMW's promotional stuff behind the R nineT and R18. Is that possibly who you mean?
 

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R nine t 2014 classic
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Discussion Starter #19
The ergonomics seem to be fairly similar. Less knee flexion on the ninet but nearly identical otherwise. Add a Rizoma MA011 bar and the ninet is far more leaned forward and bent over.
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I was going to test ride a Monster 1200s before going with the NineT - but didn't - mainly because I knew that i'd be pulling wheelies everywhere on the Monster and I wanted to ride more sensibly this time aound. I think the Monster would encourage more silly behaviour and I don't trust my self control.
does this mean that the monster is just a lot more powerful than the ninet? For some reason I get the feeling like they’re similar in power bands?
 

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The Monster is more powerful, delivers the power differently and added to the different steering head angle and Öhlins, you have a much “better” sporty bike. I rode from Germany through the Alps, down to the Ducati factory over two weeks in 2014 (1200S was new back then) and enjoyed it. I’ve owned 4 Ducatis and 2 BMWs. Reliability has been the same for me (very good).
i prefer my Urban GS as I like to travel, which is not the Monster’s sweet spot.
Do it, you only live once and can always move on.
 
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