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R NineT Pure - 2017
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Discussion Starter #41
Have you tried riding it hard?
This bike has tons of torque and is quite agile. My first ride was in Chianti Italy on SR 222. Twisty, hilly and amazingly fun. Find a great road and twist that throttle hard!!!!
Actually a funny thing has happened in the past 24 hours...
I’m no novice to motorcycles but, that said, I hadn’t checked the tyre pressures since I bought it (schoolboy error, I hear you all shout ?) yesterday I checked them and they were between 4-6 psi too low - I’ve had plenty of bikes over the years and I wasn’t hugely alarmed by this but boy was I surprised by how much more alive the bike felt with them topped up. I’ve never noticed such a difference!
I made a point of riding it again this morning and it had me smiling. The suspension is still a bit wallowy for my liking but I’m going to get a full set up and possible spring change soon so hopefully that’ll address that.

So at the moment it has a stay of execution, which has pleased me immensely.
 

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Funny, but when I test rode my Classic, which I bought used, I couldn't believe how unwilling it was to turn! Truly horrible handling. It was so bad, that even though I liked the condition and price of that one, I went and test rode another just to make sure that I wasn't experiencing normal R9T handling. Completely different on the second one. So I told the owner of the first to check his tire pressure and I'd come back for another ride. He found them way low! Test ride #2, night and day difference and I bought the bike. An even bigger difference happened when I got new tires (Pirelli Angel GTs). I think the previous owner had been riding with chronically low tires and they had worn unevenly.
 

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The combo of looks and versatile handling is what did it for me. I originally went to the dealership wanting to test and probably buy a Moto Guzzi Griso (one of the best looking bikes out there IMO). After a test ride with the Griso, I realized that something about that bike unfortunately did not work for me, and so I went to the BMW/Ducati dealership to check out my bike option # 2 (the Ducati SuperSport). As I was perusing other bikes at the BMW/Ducati dealership I saw the R9T (which I already checked out on the BMW Motorrad website days earlier, as it intrigued me due mostly to its original looks and my general preference for drive shafts over chains). So, since I had an entire afternoon to kill, I asked to test ride a R9T Pure that was sitting there, just for the hell of it, and I think that by the time I was in 5th gear my mind started drifting away from the SuperSport. I ended up riding the Pure home. Fast-forward 2 and 1/2 years later, and I have no regrets...
With all that said, my test ride experience with the Griso underlined the fact that finding the right bike is like finding the right fine suit or leather shoes. What fits for one, might not fit for another. A lot of it is in our heads as well. For one, I do not like adventure bikes simply because I do not like riding so far "above" the asphalt. This makes no sense to my brother (he rides a wonderful Ducati Multistrada 1200), but there you have it. One thing I have learned is that being comfortable on a given bike is key since it foster confidence that leads to better riding.
 

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Interestingly, after being smitten with the R9T, I decided to widen my investigation and ended up trying out a Thruxton R. It is a very, very nice bike, but I did not like the effort needed to get the initial turn-in.
I've heard swapping the spoked wheels for the cast wheels of the Speed Twin does wonders for handling, wonder if that would help with initial turn-in.

 

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I've heard swapping the spoked wheels for the cast wheels of the Speed Twin does wonders for handling, wonder if that would help with initial turn-in.
I read about that, too. I was very close to getting the Triumph—I even went so far as to register on the TriumphRat forum and followed it for a few months. I read several reviews noting the reluctance to initial turn-in; I think the problem is weight distribution more than sprung weight. That said, the R9T responds well to lighter wheels, too. Every bike will.

I have two issues with the Thruxton.

First, the upgrades to make it truly special are very expensive. As in you-should-have-made-these-standard-items-and-now-you-expect-buyers-to-pay-even-more expensive. The R9T also responds well to upgrades, but most are a few hundred here, a few hundred there. Triumph did what I consider a miracle with the motor (I really wanted to love the first Thruxton reedition but it was simply too heavy and too slow) but it is still the same basic layout. Which is to say old-school. Not necessarily bad, but also not exactly a complete overhaul. It is a wonderful motor but it is still the same layout overall.

Second (and directly relevant to the first) is that Triumph is mostly playing to nostalgia with the water-cooled twins. BMW also is playing the game but in an updated—if slightly cheaply done—manner. I scanned dozens of road tests and long-term reviews of both the Thruxton and the R9T, and the overwhelming sentiment on the Triumph has been that it has its shortcomings but it looks like a proper bike. Which is to say it looks like the old Triumph. The old-style look is a big attraction, but I know that I will get bored with the same old thing sooner than later. I already have three vintage bikes to appreciate the old vibe thing.

With the R9T, one gets a hint into the past but with a new, modern take. This is the best oil-cooled boxer motor and probably the last. The water-cooled motor will certainly supersede it when Euro 5 kicks in. The oil-coiled boxer is still the lightest version of a modern boxer, something I count as very important. This iteration is the smoothest and most powerful I have ever experienced. I also was scant inches from getting an R1200S with the hex-head (high cam) motor, but the more I looked at it, the more it made sense to get the R9T. The R9T has as least as much (more, probably) power as the high-spec R1200S motor plus improved reliability and upgraded final drive and fueling. I would like the telelever and better handling, but the R9T is no slouch there, either.

I completely understand the allure of the Triumph. I still like it very much, but the R9T is the type of bike that I know I will increasingly appreciate the more I ride it. The Triumph? For me, it will always be exactly what it started out to be.

Sorry to hijack your thread with this semi-rant. :)
 

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No mate, don't be sad for me! I love my RnineT, if you read the posts above it you'll see i was talking about a Sportster i bought and wasn't happy with..... I traded it for my UrbanGS and couldn't be happier with my decision.

Best wishes mate, hope you recover quickly!
Oh I’m so glad, I didn’t want to hurt your feelings. I just get sooo much pleasure tearing around town on my 9T and mistakenly thought you were disappointed in yours. I’m very pleased we’re still mates. I Ride like the wind and all my troubles seem to fade. I just wanted that for you too. Good on you mate. Cheers Blitz
 

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So, I'm not giving you any perspective that hasn't already been more than adequately articulated by all of the above posts, but I figured I might as well chime in. I've been through many bikes, ranging from Kawasakis, Harley's, Ducatis, and now BMW with my R9T. There was never a bike that I didn't like, but once I swung a leg over a Nine T, everything about what I thought I wanted in a motorbike completely changed. The bike I owned at the time was a Ducati 848 EVO that I had modded quite a bit, and I thought that was my ideal motorcycle. Not to sound dramatic, but my 9T took my hobby for motorcycles and turned it into a passion. Objective measurements for motorcycles, I think, mean very little. Case and point, when I had the 848 EVO, I went and test rode the V4S, with the intention of buying it. In every objective measurement, the V4S was a better motorcycle. Despite that, I left that day on my 848 EVO because it made me feel better, I was more connected, and it was a more truly visceral experience. The Nine T has enabled me to identify the things I most treasure about motorcycles. I've told my wife many times, "It doesn't get any better than this, only different." I mean that too. The R Nine T is the first motorcycle I have owned that I know I will never part with. Every subsequent bike must be in addition to the Nine T. If your bike doesn't make you feel that way, search for one that does!
 

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I read about that, too. I was very close to getting the Triumph—I even went so far as to register on the TriumphRat forum and followed it for a few months. I read several reviews noting the reluctance to initial turn-in; I think the problem is weight distribution more than sprung weight. That said, the R9T responds well to lighter wheels, too. Every bike will.

I have two issues with the Thruxton.

First, the upgrades to make it truly special are very expensive. As in you-should-have-made-these-standard-items-and-now-you-expect-buyers-to-pay-even-more expensive. The R9T also responds well to upgrades, but most are a few hundred here, a few hundred there. Triumph did what I consider a miracle with the motor (I really wanted to love the first Thruxton reedition but it was simply too heavy and too slow) but it is still the same basic layout. Which is to say old-school. Not necessarily bad, but also not exactly a complete overhaul. It is a wonderful motor but it is still the same layout overall.

Second (and directly relevant to the first) is that Triumph is mostly playing to nostalgia with the water-cooled twins. BMW also is playing the game but in an updated—if slightly cheaply done—manner. I scanned dozens of road tests and long-term reviews of both the Thruxton and the R9T, and the overwhelming sentiment on the Triumph has been that it has its shortcomings but it looks like a proper bike. Which is to say it looks like the old Triumph. The old-style look is a big attraction, but I know that I will get bored with the same old thing sooner than later. I already have three vintage bikes to appreciate the old vibe thing.

With the R9T, one gets a hint into the past but with a new, modern take. This is the best oil-cooled boxer motor and probably the last. The water-cooled motor will certainly supersede it when Euro 5 kicks in. The oil-coiled boxer is still the lightest version of a modern boxer, something I count as very important. This iteration is the smoothest and most powerful I have ever experienced. I also was scant inches from getting an R1200S with the hex-head (high cam) motor, but the more I looked at it, the more it made sense to get the R9T. The R9T has as least as much (more, probably) power as the high-spec R1200S motor plus improved reliability and upgraded final drive and fueling. I would like the telelever and better handling, but the R9T is no slouch there, either.

I completely understand the allure of the Triumph. I still like it very much, but the R9T is the type of bike that I know I will increasingly appreciate the more I ride it. The Triumph? For me, it will always be exactly what it started out to be.

Sorry to hijack your thread with this semi-rant. :)
I rode my Thruxton R yesterday and think it's time to part with it. You're right, besides the looks and the engine, I'm not feeling it with this bike. People say the R9T's gearbox is 'agricultural', but I find it quite satisfying if ridden correctly. On the other hand, I can't come to terms with my Thruxton's clunky gearbox in the first 3 gears. In comparing how the two bikes make me feel, the Thruxton felt sportier in stance, a little more special feeling. I've since changed to lower bars on my R9T and I feel like I've hit the sweet spot for what I was looking for: a sleeker and more cafe-ish R9T, retaining most of the comfort.
 

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I also had a Triumph Bonneville, well the Bobber before buying the Racer. Imo the R Nine T is much more fun to ride but as the old saying goes "opinions are arseholes, everyone has one". Each to their own, if it doesn't do it for you then move on.
 

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People say the R9T's gearbox is 'agricultural', but I find it quite satisfying if ridden correctly.
This.

Some of the bikes I love most are those that require some degree of skill and precision to ride. There is a good argument to be made for a bike that is easy to use, but on the other hand, the fun (for me) is in more than simply watching the scenery pass by. My Ducati 750 F1 is not comfortable and is full of quirks, but I would not trade the experience. Similarly, my Moto Morini is difficult to ride when compared to most other bikes, but when I get things right, it is transcendent.

Learning to use the throttle, clutch, and foot controls is part of the beauty in any bike.
 

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This.

Some of the bikes I love most are those that require some degree of skill and precision to ride. There is a good argument to be made for a bike that is easy to use, but on the other hand, the fun (for me) is in more than simply watching the scenery pass by. My Ducati 750 F1 is not comfortable and is full of quirks, but I would not trade the experience. Similarly, my Moto Morini is difficult to ride when compared to most other bikes, but when I get things right, it is transcendent.

Learning to use the throttle, clutch, and foot controls is part of the beauty in any bike.
You are so right. In Texas it’s like having a horse, each one is very different than the other. They all are similar but not identical ... however ... you always have a favorite no matter how many Animals you have. My BlitzSchnell is by far and away the best I’ve known for every reason I can question. Every time I dismount that girl it takes me an hour to wipe the grin off my face and remember I’m 70 years old and not 20. What more could a grown man ask for than that ? Live-long & Go-fast ! It does the body good, adrenaline is your friend. StayUpOn2 it’s as close to flying as you’ll ever get while still on the ground ! Be well & happy
Tempus fugit gentlemen. Cheers
 

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I rode my Thruxton R yesterday and think it's time to part with it. You're right, besides the looks and the engine, I'm not feeling it with this bike. People say the R9T's gearbox is 'agricultural', but I find it quite satisfying if ridden correctly. On the other hand, I can't come to terms with my Thruxton's clunky gearbox in the first 3 gears. In comparing how the two bikes make me feel, the Thruxton felt sportier in stance, a little more special feeling. I've since changed to lower bars on my R9T and I feel like I've hit the sweet spot for what I was looking for: a sleeker and more cafe-ish R9T, retaining most of the comfort.
Hi, Same ive flat motorX bars on my scrambler by TAG. I feel the riding position is transformed for the better too.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Well it’s been a while since my original post and I’ve stuck with the R9T - the tyre pressure ‘epiphany’ was absolutely one factor but I’ve also got my position dialled and I bought some CNC levers and they’ve really made a difference in feel, along with the look.
Yesterday I went out on a 120 mile ride down to West Bay (Dorset) and it was fantastic, I actually went 2up and took a friend of mine - my goodness does that bike pull! I knew it had power but it just towed us around and up and down with no noticeable sap in power... utterly impressed.
I also adjusted the sag on the shock and that has made the rear end feel better when I’m one up also.

When we got to West Bay I parked up next to a beautiful Triumph, the guy had his family there and it was obvious it was a new purchase for him - the bike looked great but actually I liked having something different, especially when I started the R9T up with my Pro Race slip on - it sounds great!

So guys, many, many thanks for all the suggestions, opinions and guidance - I’m pleased I ‘reached out’ and I’m happy that I’ve gone through the motions with the bike. Chuffed.

Cheers!
 

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Well it’s been a while since my original post and I’ve stuck with the R9T - the tyre pressure ‘epiphany’ was absolutely one factor but I’ve also got my position dialled and I bought some CNC levers and they’ve really made a difference in feel, along with the look.
Yesterday I went out on a 120 mile ride down to West Bay (Dorset) and it was fantastic, I actually went 2up and took a friend of mine - my goodness does that bike pull! I knew it had power but it just towed us around and up and down with no noticeable sap in power... utterly impressed.
I also adjusted the sag on the shock and that has made the rear end feel better when I’m one up also.

When we got to West Bay I parked up next to a beautiful Triumph, the guy had his family there and it was obvious it was a new purchase for him - the bike looked great but actually I liked having something different, especially when I started the R9T up with my Pro Race slip on - it sounds great!

So guys, many, many thanks for all the suggestions, opinions and guidance - I’m pleased I ‘reached out’ and I’m happy that I’ve gone through the motions with the bike. Chuffed.

Cheers!
These tag flat mx bars made all the difference for me ?
20200119_164800.jpg
 

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Well it’s been a while since my original post and I’ve stuck with the R9T - the tyre pressure ‘epiphany’ was absolutely one factor but I’ve also got my position dialled and I bought some CNC levers and they’ve really made a difference in feel, along with the look.
Yesterday I went out on a 120 mile ride down to West Bay (Dorset) and it was fantastic, I actually went 2up and took a friend of mine - my goodness does that bike pull! I knew it had power but it just towed us around and up and down with no noticeable sap in power... utterly impressed.
I also adjusted the sag on the shock and that has made the rear end feel better when I’m one up also.

When we got to West Bay I parked up next to a beautiful Triumph, the guy had his family there and it was obvious it was a new purchase for him - the bike looked great but actually I liked having something different, especially when I started the R9T up with my Pro Race slip on - it sounds great!

So guys, many, many thanks for all the suggestions, opinions and guidance - I’m pleased I ‘reached out’ and I’m happy that I’ve gone through the motions with the bike. Chuffed.

Cheers!
I knew if you gave her the opportunity to prove herself you’d see why were all in love with the 9T.
She’s one torque’e woman with a heart and real guts, which by the way you better have some too when you twist her wrist and she winds out. Hold on, your in for a surprise. I’ve never gone with a WOT for more than 20 or 30 seconds at a complete lock on the throttle, but when I did it felt to me like she was still gaining speed at 137 on the clock and registered 129 on my GPS. I ran out of road and had to back off to 100 for a good 10 minutes and she roared and not once did she wimper. My moto is stock but for a flapperectomy and gutted stock mufflers. I can’t wait for summer to mod-up the ECU and Dyno tune her. I’m sure she’ll push close to 150. That my friend is the most amazing feeling on earth. I can’t even imaging what it would be like to run the TT at 200. My heart would explode in my chest but I’d have a huge smile on my face .... StayUpOn2 Mate..... Cheers Blitz
 

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Sorry to go on, but what's not to enjoy... i just did 520km round trip yesterday. I really like this bike. And lucky enough to have a choice of the type of bike to take out. I'm still taking the scrambler out on most occasions. Not to brag.. just saying I get what I look for from this bike.
 

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I've had mine out twice since I got it, last Sunday and today (Sunday) both relatively short runs both cold runs and have to admit I didn't particularly enjoy either. I'm putting it down to, ride one with an open face helmet, leather jacket and jeans just not being suitable for the temps and ride two, leather jacket and jeans just not being suitable for the temps.

Here's hoping it warms up soon though I fear just getting a chance to ride is going to be a bigger problem as the days go on.

Rich, possibly the worst audio I have ever heard on video.
 
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