BMW NineT Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Vote for the Site Favourite BOTM winner for the year of 2022 HERE!
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

Registered
2021 R Nine T Urban G/S 40th Anniversary
Joined
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, so a few weeks ago I joined the NineT Owners forum and posted my first post with a picture and some minor description but now I need to give you all the back story on my new (.1 miles) 2021 R9T Urban 40th Anniversary G/S. First its a Flood bike (first strike) and I knew it was going to be a very intensive repair but this poor bike had a very bad time after the flood. After I got it home the first thing I needed to do was drain all the oils, so I took the engine drain plug out, No Oil. After further inspection I noticed cracked engine case (strike two) the salvage yard must have used a forklift to move the bike and cracked the engine cases. (I got the cases to a good welder but the alloy will not accept a weld, new cases on order) During the engine disassembly I found one of the cam-chains broken, (strike three) someone must of tried to start the bike after the flood! Can you believe that! I'm also not holding out much hope for the DME (we'll see when I power up) also the alternators voltage regulator is burnt out, so I will need at least a used one to salvage for parts. I've been working on this bike since late November 2022 and I have over 125 hrs into the bike, everything is cleaned and inspected and I'm waiting for parts to come in. For those wondering how far I tore down the bike, well it might be easier to tell you what I didn't take apart and that would be the front forks (their sealed) all else was disassembled, cleaned & inspected. I will add a few pictures now and I will update from time to time, I hope to get this bike up and going sometime this summer. Keep in touch. MattiD Tire Wheel Plant Fuel tank Vehicle
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive fuel system Automotive design
Car Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Tire
Tire Bicycle handlebar Bicycle tire Automotive tire Wheel
 

Registered
2019 Scrambler Option 719, 2013 K1600GTL,
Joined
494 Posts
Wow. You have some real determination to keep going with this bike. You should get a youtube channel, start a chronicle of everything you're doing, then start a crowd funding site. Maybe you can get some help with all the money this is going to cost you and maybe even bank a little bit. I'm super curious to see where you go next with this bike. It would be absolutely fantastic to see it on the road again. Best of success to you.
 

Registered
2015 BMW R nine T 2018 BMW 1200GSA Rallye, 2018 BMW R1200R Sport, 2005 Kawasaki ZRX1200R
Joined
142 Posts
During the engine disassembly I found one of the cam-chains broken, (strike three) someone must of tried to start the bike after the flood! Can you believe that!
That's interesting. I assume that your thoughts are that one of the cylinders was hydraulically locked with water and this caused the cam chain to snap? Or for some other reason related to the flood?
When I tried to start my salvage bike for the first time it wouldn't turn over and I found the left cylinder was completely full of engine oil. I eventually worked out that the bike had been transported on its left hand side at some point and oil had run up the breather pipe to the air box and when the bike was put back upright the oil had then run from the air box down the left hand cylinder air intake tube and filled the cylinder. Without knowing any of this at the time I made several attempts to turn the bike over assuming initially that the battery was stuffed, it was 6 years old by that point and the bike has stood for months before I bought it, so a reasonable assumption I thought. I put a brand new, fully charged battery on the bike and it was only then, when it still wouldn't turn, that I investigated further by removing the plugs and realised what was wrong.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting


I've since recommissioned the bike and done a couple of thousand kilometres on it and it runs perfectly despite my earlier attempts to crank it over with a hydraulically locked cylinder so your bike suffering a broken cam chain surprised me somewhat. I would have thought that a bent con rod or valves would be the most likely damage.
Good luck with the rebuild. The perseverance of some of the people on this forum in repairing damaged bikes continues to amaze and impress me. Repairing my bike was no more than a wipe over with an oily rag by comparison :ROFLMAO:
 

Registered
BMW R Nine T Urban GS X
Joined
203 Posts
Very interesting, How did the crank and cylinder bores hold up? I've know few vehicles that flooded and the bores were full of water for only a few weeks, and seriously corroded so much the needed boring +2 piston sizes. if someone has tried starting it then all sorted of damage would have happened. Did the transmission flood also?
 

Premium Member
Joined
1,210 Posts
If i may ask; how much did you pay for the bike? It must have been a good deal if you want to invest this much work / parts into it.

(And also it's a fun as hell project of course.. time spent on hobby is priceless)
 

Administrator
Joined
13,865 Posts
Wow, now that is a whole shed-load of work behind and ahead of you. Respect for taking such a task on.
 

Premium Member
The fleet...9T 鈥榗lassic鈥 F800gt, Mz Ts150, Etz250, Beneli 125 2c, TL1000s, Trx 850, Katana 250/4, X7
Joined
683 Posts
@mattid7 that鈥檚 a real labour of love and it looks like it鈥檚 been in a river for a long time to get that patina? I have bought swimmers before , mostly cars although I always pay what they are worth and that very little from experience. I鈥檝e also known for wiring looms to go green too after a while and I鈥檝e had brakes that have applied themselves too (on cars) as servos were full of river water 馃槺馃ぃ馃ぃ
 

Registered
2015 BMW R nine T 2018 BMW 1200GSA Rallye, 2018 BMW R1200R Sport, 2005 Kawasaki ZRX1200R
Joined
142 Posts
There's a sound reason why flood damaged or water damaged vehicles are compulsory statutory write offs here, ie unable to be purchased, repaired and re registered for road use again in any Australian state or territory. And that's down to the reliance on electronics nowadays for managing all the safety features that we take for granted in a modern vehicle.
Mechanical and cosmetic damage can be repaired and inspected relatively easily but the legacy of water damage is a real unknown weeks, months or years after the event.
 

Registered
Joined
555 Posts
Yeah, cudos for that plan!
... but by looking at the pics and reading the posts I come to the conclusion:This Bumble Bee won't ever fly again.
Stop wasting time and money, sell the useful parts (or keep them) and get yourself a fresh one.
 

Registered
Joined
448 Posts
Fresh water or salt water which one did the deed? Clear title or salvage title could affect the valve and your ability to insure the bike. It looks like that bike was submerged for a while so either one could be a bike killer but salt water is for sure. It is important also to know where the bike (submarine) got its bath. Here in SWFL there were a lot of bikes flooded with salt water from that nasty guy Ian, a lot of them had no insurance. Some bikes were hosed off, flushed, all fluids changed and are being ridden as you read this. Some of those bikes will be good to go for a while or maybe longer, many will have system failures and significant repair bills as time goes by and the corrosion takes out switches sensors and major components. You also have to keep in mind some of that flood water has made its way into the interior of frame components by way of vent holes used during the welding process when it was manufacture. You would be much better off with a new or gently used 40th UGS and using the extra parts to keep the good stuff clean and unused. Maybe get a basic UGS and turn it into a 40th UGS.

I'm not opposed to taking on nearly impossible resurrections but the end value verses the time and money investment has always been a consideration for me. The before and after of my 1969 R 69S Barn Bike. Lotsa cash and time spent but it was well worth the investment considering the back story to the bike.
 

Attachments

Premium Member
Joined
3,456 Posts
Hi all, so a few weeks ago I joined the NineT Owners forum and posted my first post with a picture and some minor description but now I need to give you all the back story on my new (.1 miles) 2021 R9T Urban 40th Anniversary G/S. First its a Flood bike (first strike) and I knew it was going to be a very intensive repair but this poor bike had a very bad time after the flood. After I got it home the first thing I needed to do was drain all the oils, so I took the engine drain plug out, No Oil. After further inspection I noticed cracked engine case (strike two) the salvage yard must have used a forklift to move the bike and cracked the engine cases. (I got the cases to a good welder but the alloy will not accept a weld, new cases on order) During the engine disassembly I found one of the cam-chains broken, (strike three) someone must of tried to start the bike after the flood! Can you believe that! I'm also not holding out much hope for the DME (we'll see when I power up) also the alternators voltage regulator is burnt out, so I will need at least a used one to salvage for parts. I've been working on this bike since late November 2022 and I have over 125 hrs into the bike, everything is cleaned and inspected and I'm waiting for parts to come in. For those wondering how far I tore down the bike, well it might be easier to tell you what I didn't take apart and that would be the front forks (their sealed) all else was disassembled, cleaned & inspected. I will add a few pictures now and I will update from time to time, I hope to get this bike up and going sometime this summer. Keep in touch. MattiD View attachment 161232 View attachment 161233 View attachment 161234 View attachment 161235
I鈥檓 with @Chris. How much did you pay for your trouble ? That鈥檚 a genuine mess. The hardcore mechanical repairs are achievable but as @Sundodger pointed out 鈥 the reliability of all component electronics has been compromised 鈥 better replace all integrated electronic components or be prepared for failure 鈥 not sure if it will ever be life threatening but most certainly inconvenient when they fail 鈥︹︹︹︹︹ wonderful challenge Sir, good luck with it. That BumbleBee (or yellow jacket in Texas) is one pretty bike鈥︹. I wish you the best, please keep us posted on your progress 鈥︹︹ I鈥檓 pulling for you Mate ! 鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹.. Blitz
 

Registered
2021 R Nine T Urban G/S 40th Anniversary
Joined
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That's interesting. I assume that your thoughts are that one of the cylinders was hydraulically locked with water and this caused the cam chain to snap? Or for some other reason related to the flood?
When I tried to start my salvage bike for the first time it wouldn't turn over and I found the left cylinder was completely full of engine oil. I eventually worked out that the bike had been transported on its left hand side at some point and oil had run up the breather pipe to the air box and when the bike was put back upright the oil had then run from the air box down the left hand cylinder air intake tube and filled the cylinder. Without knowing any of this at the time I made several attempts to turn the bike over assuming initially that the battery was stuffed, it was 6 years old by that point and the bike has stood for months before I bought it, so a reasonable assumption I thought. I put a brand new, fully charged battery on the bike and it was only then, when it still wouldn't turn, that I investigated further by removing the plugs and realised what was wrong. View attachment 161244

I've since recommissioned the bike and done a couple of thousand kilometres on it and it runs perfectly despite my earlier attempts to crank it over with a hydraulically locked cylinder so your bike suffering a broken cam chain surprised me somewhat. I would have thought that a bent con rod or valves would be the most likely damage.
Good luck with the rebuild. The perseverance of some of the people on this forum in repairing damaged bikes continues to amaze and impress me. Repairing my bike was no more than a wipe over with an oily rag by comparison :ROFLMAO:
I also thought a broken cam chain was a little suspect but I can't think of anything else that would have done it. I've checked the rods pistons & valves and all is fine, any ideas? Maybe it was on the bottom of the stroke with just some water in the cylinder and had some momentum before getting locked?
 

Registered
2021 R Nine T Urban G/S 40th Anniversary
Joined
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I鈥檓 with @Chris. How much did you pay for your trouble ? That鈥檚 a genuine mess. The hardcore mechanical repairs are achievable but as @Sundodger pointed out 鈥 the reliability of all component electronics has been compromised 鈥 better replace all integrated electronic components or be prepared for failure 鈥 not sure if it will ever be life threatening but most certainly inconvenient when they fail 鈥︹︹︹︹︹ wonderful challenge Sir, good luck with it. That BumbleBee (or yellow jacket in Texas) is one pretty bike鈥︹. I wish you the best, please keep us posted on your progress 鈥︹︹ I鈥檓 pulling for you Mate ! 鈥︹︹︹︹︹︹.. Blitz
Well for the bike I paid approximately $3100 USD. The entire engine & main harness has been ultrasonic cleaned with cleaner designed for electronics and electrical devices (S1) also all connections have been treated with SuperCoreA ( $125 can) to prevent any more corrosion, we used this extensively in the Aviation field I worked in, this product is a life saver. View attachment 161294
 

Registered
2021 R Nine T Urban G/S 40th Anniversary
Joined
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Fresh water or salt water which one did the deed? Clear title or salvage title could affect the valve and your ability to insure the bike. It looks like that bike was submerged for a while so either one could be a bike killer but salt water is for sure. It is important also to know where the bike (submarine) got its bath. Here in SWFL there were a lot of bikes flooded with salt water from that nasty guy Ian, a lot of them had no insurance. Some bikes were hosed off, flushed, all fluids changed and are being ridden as you read this. Some of those bikes will be good to go for a while or maybe longer, many will have system failures and significant repair bills as time goes by and the corrosion takes out switches sensors and major components. You also have to keep in mind some of that flood water has made its way into the interior of frame components by way of vent holes used during the welding process when it was manufacture. You would be much better off with a new or gently used 40th UGS and using the extra parts to keep the good stuff clean and unused. Maybe get a basic UGS and turn it into a 40th UGS.

I'm not opposed to taking on nearly impossible resurrections but the end value verses the time and money investment has always been a consideration for me. The before and after of my 1969 R 69S Barn Bike. Lotsa cash and time spent but it was well worth the investment considering the back story to the bike.
This was a fresh water flood and I have a salvage title with the ability to convert to a standard title after an inspection and proof of repairs with receipts, that shouldn't be a problem!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top