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Discussion Starter #1
Hi R9T community, glad to have found this group.
I am considering an R9T to replace my 2010 R12 GS 30th Anniversary Edition I recently sold after a delightful 10 years ownership. As soon as I delivered the GS to its new owner , I knew deep down it was a mistake!
After 60 years on two wheels (I am 76) , I talked my self into believing that I should hang up the helmet, and count my blessings for a great run!
Well, that didn’t last long.....I have liked the R9T since it’s introduction, but needed the GS for the longer rides, space, utility, and occasional trails. So the T was not an option then.
Now I am looking for a “hundred mile” bike vs a 500 mile bike, one that still puts a grin on my face, and has the ride/handling/DNA that I have gotten used to with 5 previous BMW’s, starting with. 73 R60/5 Toaster Tank, then a R90/6, then a K75S, followed by an R11000 RT, a 2005GS and the 2010 GS 30th.

So I am considering the original R9T (Classic), the Pure, or maybe the Scrambler. Are the specs pretty much the same on these, is the Classic 2014-2016 the same as the current Classic? Does the Pure give up anything on specs or performance? Are there common issues/problems on these, my initial thoughts and impressions are that the T is loved and very reliable, just like my GS!

Right now based on initial research I am favoring a Classic, first generation, with less than 15000 miles, and in the $7-9k price range. Would also consider a newer Pure in the $8-9 k ranges.

Please reply with thoughts, suggestions and/or advice.

Thanks!
 

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2019 RnineT
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I’ve always believed in a general rule of thumb that applies here. Buy the newest, lowest mileage example that you can afford. Hopefully this will be a bike you can ride well into your 90’s! A few bucks either way won’t matter at that point. The Classic offers adjustable front suspension and a tachometer but I suspect the version that makes “it move” should be your choice as they’re all great bikes. Good luck with your search. Keep us posted!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Choco, good advice that I agree with!
If it doesn’t put a smile on your face when you ride, or if you don’t look back after you park it, maybe it’s not the one!
 

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2011 R1200RT - 2015 RNineT
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@R9TFWS Welcome to the group, you have found the best source for 9T's The 9T is not a GS from a riding position, it is a much smaller bike. I had a R12GS and now a R12RT along with a R9T Classic. I really like the 9T and it is fine for a couple hundred mile but you feel it. What is your riding goals? All street or some fire roads? If all road, I'd say the 9T Classic but if some fire roads than a Scrambler is probably more in line. The early Classics do not have adjustable front forks and while they aren't terrible they aren't great either, I know as I have a 2015... Try to find a well maintained one, I prefer to buy the Seller rather than just the bike. Do a lot of reading try to ride one before you commit. If the 9T is too tight for you I'd suggest looking at an R12R, either oil cooled or the newer water cooled.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@R9TFWS Welcome to the group, you have found the best source for 9T's The 9T is not a GS from a riding position, it is a much smaller bike. I had a R12GS and now a R12RT along with a R9T Classic. I really like the 9T and it is fine for a couple hundred mile but you feel it. What is your riding goals? All street or some fire roads? If all road, I'd say the 9T Classic but if some fire roads than a Scrambler is probably more in line. The early Classics do not have adjustable front forks and while they aren't terrible they aren't great either, I know as I have a 2015... Try to find a well maintained one, I prefer to buy the Seller rather than just the bike. Do a lot of reading try to ride one before you commit. If the 9T is too tight for you I'd suggest looking at an R12R, either oil cooled or the newer water cooled.
Thanks DM, great advice, and good knowing that the early Classic did not have adjustable front suspension. My riding style is back roads, quick pace, slow in/fast out. And yes, my motto has been “buy the seller” , and have never been disappointed when following this.
Based on this, is there a noticeable difference in ride/handling between an early Classic, and a later, 2018 Pure?
Thanks again, and I will let forum know my progress.
 

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2016 RNineT Classic
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Still owning a 2001 GSA myself, and never selling that one, I can totally relate. The size difference is quite dramatic, so you’re on the right track here. Why don’t you look at the li’l sister, the Urban GS (the most recent 2021 40y anniversary looks stunning, I think)
The R NineTs are all relatively low, for that reason better than the 850s, have enough grunt to never bore, and you’ll have a lot of fun. The only thing you might want to immediately invest in, is an aftermarket seat. I went with a Sargent, and it’s a day-and-night difference.
 

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2011 R1200RT - 2015 RNineT
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Your question relative to suspension, I test rode a 2020 Classic and planned on buying a 2020 Pure. A 2015 Classic popped up that I couldn't turn down. I didn't ride my 2015 and the 2020 Classic back to back but it's not day and night from my recollection. Never had a chance to ride a Pure but I had planned on doing a suspension upgrade based on what I had read had I bought the Pure. I don't think there have been any changes to the Pure through the updates but perhaps someone can confirm or correct me on that.

My riding style is similar to yours, I live in SWFLA but a lot of miles are in NC,TN,SC,GA mountain roads and it works well. I may pop for a new suspension at some point but I'm enjoying it as is.

I
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Your question relative to suspension, I test rode a 2020 Classic and planned on buying a 2020 Pure. A 2015 Classic popped up that I couldn't turn down. I didn't ride my 2015 and the 2020 Classic back to back but it's not day and night from my recollection. Never had a chance to ride a Pure but I had planned on doing a suspension upgrade based on what I had read had I bought the Pure. I don't think there have been any changes to the Pure through the updates but perhaps someone can confirm or correct me on that.

My riding style is similar to yours, I live in SWFLA but a lot of miles are in NC,TN,SC,GA mountain roads and it works well. I may pop for a new suspension at some point but I'm enjoying it as is.

I
Thanks again, I have enjoyed those roads for over 20 years, fortunately we have very similar routes here in western Maryland and West Virginia Appalachia mountains.
 

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BMW R nineT Pure
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Welcome to the forum! :)

I'm late to the party, as I just bought my 2020 Pure a few months ago. I liked the looks of the R nineT for a while, but had never considered buying one until early August 2020. I'd had a 6th gen. Honda VFR 800 for the last 14 years as my only bike prior to buying this BMW. (Also, I sold my VFR a few weeks ago.) So my R9T Pure was a big change for me, but I am really digging my new bike. I've put about 2,500 miles on it so far, with zero issues.

The engines in all the R9Ts are the same air/oil-cooled mill. The biggest differences between the "Classic" and the Pure are the forks, front brakes, exhausts, gauges, and of course the paint. Also, spoked wheels have been standard on the R nineT, and cast wheels on the Pure, though spoked wheels have been an option. The Scrambler is much like the Pure, but with slightly relaxed fork geometry and the high mount dual exhaust. Also, I think the Scrambler has come with cast wheels standard, and spoked wheels as an option, with choice of tires between 50/50 knobbies and regular street tires on either set of wheels.

The most common complaints are:.
  • Suspension -- Many people mod the suspension of whatever model they buy, whether it's front end, rear shock, or both. But if you're of average rider weight, it might not need to be done unless you're looking for much better performance.
  • Seat -- As @Norbi mentioned above, the OEM seat is not great. I swapped mine out for a Sargent a month after buying the bike. It's still not wonderful in my opinion, but much better than the original saddle and well worth the cost.
  • Headlight -- The stock headlight on the current models isn't terrific. Make sure it's aimed correctly with your suspension sag though. I had to tilt my headlight housing forward a bit and it made a huge difference.
  • Mirrors -- The stock mirrors aren't wide enough for many people. Many owners swap them out for bar end mirrors, or add mirror extenders to the stock set.
  • Fuel capacity -- The fuel tank is kind of small. But it won't be an issue if you're not riding hundreds of miles a day. Even if you are riding long distances, most people are going to take a break every hour or two anyway, so just gas up when you stop.
  • Luggage -- Luggage options are just so-so in my opinion, with large capacity, waterproof hardbags pretty much non-existent. But if you're not looking to do major tours with your R9T you'll be fine with whatever bags you choose, if any. Personally, I'm planning to install a rear luggage rack and use a decent sized waterproof duffel strapped down to the rear seat and rack. If that doesn't work out, I'll try something else.
Mechanically, I've heard of zero widespread issues with any R9T model. A few people have had issues with the engine burning through a little oil, but it doesn't seem to be very common at all.

Some people have had batteries die after just 2-3 years. The battery is under the fuel tank, so it's a pain to get to, but if you know this up front I don't think it's a big deal. It also doesn't seem to be a very common issue.

I hope all that doesn't sound too negative. Also, not everyone agrees about the things above. Overall this is a terrific machine with tons of great character, and it will put a smile on your face every single time you ride it. I like mine more every ride. Also, there are tons of mods available for the R9T, and most people do at least a couple, for performance and/or appearance. Some of the bikes end up looking like beautiful motorcycle art, but the bikes are still very rideable, and not just fancy looking showpieces.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow, TimC, what a great review and summary of the R9T models and equipment.
Yes my 500 + mile days are behind me, this will be my fun ride, even just for errands or local rides going nowhere. So range, storage and all day comfort are less important than when I had the R12GS. But suspension is important, so that may be where focus after a few “look good “ farkles.
Thanks again for taking the time to respond.
 

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2017 R nineT Classic
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The Classic offers adjustable front suspension
This is only the case on '17+ bikes. Pre-17 bikes the suspension is not adjustable up front.

The biggest differences between the "Classic" and the Pure are the forks, front brakes, exhausts, gauges, and of course the paint. Also, spoked wheels have been standard on the R nineT, and cast wheels on the Pure, though spoked wheels have been an option. The Scrambler is much like the Pure, but with slightly relaxed fork geometry and the high mount dual exhaust. Also, I think the Scrambler has come with cast wheels standard, and spoked wheels as an option
Only the Classic has a rear suspension preload adjuster built in, all others must be done with a tool to adjust the rings. The Classic also has an aluminum tank while all other models have a steel tank. The aluminum is obviously a premium feature but it is worth noting that it won't accomodate a magnetic tank bag if that is in people's plans. The least noticeable difference on all of them is the rear frame. The Classic has a 2 part rear frame that can be unbolted to make a bobber style without the rear seat, while all others have a 1 part rear frame
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is only the case on '17+ bikes. Pre-17 bikes the suspension is not adjustable up front.



Only the Classic has a rear suspension preload adjuster built in, all others must be done with a tool to adjust the rings. The Classic also has an aluminum tank while all other models have a steel tank. The aluminum is obviously a premium feature but it is worth noting that it won't accomodate a magnetic tank bag if that is in people's plans. The least noticeable difference on all of them is the rear frame. The Classic has a 2 part rear frame that can be unbolted to make a bobber style without the rear seat, while all others have a 1 part rear frame
Thanks for adding to my knowledge base on the R9T. Learned a lot in just a few hours!
 

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This is only the case on '17+ bikes. Pre-17 bikes the suspension is not adjustable up front.

Only the Classic has a rear suspension preload adjuster built in, all others must be done with a tool to adjust the rings. The Classic also has an aluminum tank while all other models have a steel tank. The aluminum is obviously a premium feature but it is worth noting that it won't accomodate a magnetic tank bag if that is in people's plans. The least noticeable difference on all of them is the rear frame. The Classic has a 2 part rear frame that can be unbolted to make a bobber style without the rear seat, while all others have a 1 part rear frame
I always forget about the difference in the tanks when telling someone about the different models. But one reason I chose the Pure was the steel tank, because I have a few favorite magnetic tank bags I've used for years.

And I didn't know about the difference in rear frames. Good to know!
 

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I always forget about the difference in the tanks when telling someone about the different models. But one reason I chose the Pure was the steel tank, because I have a few favorite magnetic tank bags I've used for years.

And I didn't know about the difference in rear frames. Good to know!
Hi TimC,
My Pure has the brushed Ali tank.
I wish it had the 2 piece rear sub frame too.
Not sure, but do the latest Classic model still have to 2 piece rear sub?
Cheers,Ken.
 

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BMW R nineT Pure
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Hi TimC,
My Pure has the brushed Ali tank.
I wish it had the 2 piece rear sub frame too.
Not sure, but do the latest Classic model still have to 2 piece rear sub?
Cheers,Ken.
I just happened to be checking out some Beemers on a big online classified motorcycle sales site last night, and saw a used Pure for sale with brushed aluminum tank. Looks great! I remember first seeing the then-brand new black R9T in at a local dealership several years ago and liking it, but not loving it. The next year they had one with the brushed tank and I thought it was a big improvement. :)
 

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Thanks again, I have enjoyed those roads for over 20 years, fortunately we have very similar routes here in western Maryland and West Virginia Appalachia mountains.
Yes, WMD and WV is very much like WNC. My family has been in Garrett Co. MD since the 1700's; lots of kinfolk in that neck of the woods....
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I just happened to be checking out some Beemers on a big online classified motorcycle sales site last night, and saw a used Pure for sale with brushed aluminum tank. Looks great! I remember first seeing the then-brand new black R9T in at a local dealership several years ago and liking it, but not loving it. The next year they had one with the brushed tank and I thought it was a big improvement. :)
Thanks again, Tim.
Which site were you looking at? I am on CycleTrader nation wide just to see where the market is.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes, WMD and WV is very much like WNC. My family has been in Garrett Co. MD since the 1700's; lots of kinfolk in that neck of the woods....
I live in Oakland MD, and great riding roads are 1/2 mile from my driveway! Bad news is riding season is short, mid April through October, plus/minus based on "climate change" . Had first snow this week, but temps tomorrow will be in high 50's.
What is your family name(s), though not a native, I have lived here 20 years and know a few folks!
 

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On longer spirited rides the vibration of the 9T can really kick my ass. It's a pretty rough ride tbh.
 
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