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I set my rear static sag to about 20-25mm. With full gear and tyre pressure of 36psi.

For me when the preload is too soft the bike tends to feel like its understeering when throttling spiritedly out of corners. The weight shift too much to the rear making the front end feels too light and the rear suspension squats a little for my liking.

My bad, decided to check my notes. My setting is rider sag is about 25mm and static sag was about 10mm.
 

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Static/Free Sag None from factory?

I understand the stock suspension on a scrambler is set up for someone approx 84kg with gear. I'm 83kg and have about 40mm of rider sag which I believe is a pretty good amount to have the suspension sit in the middle of its travel. However I have zero static sag, I picked up the bike last week from the dealership, has anyone else noticed this?

Trying to separate preload and dampening so there's no confusion here. I'm interested in how to remove some of the bouncy feeling from the bike, obviously I can increase the dampening, however this may not be enough, I would be interested to understand if it has something to do also with the fact I have no static sag?

Cheers!
 

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I understand the stock suspension on a scrambler is set up for someone approx 84kg with gear. I'm 83kg and have about 40mm of rider sag which I believe is a pretty good amount to have the suspension sit in the middle of its travel. However I have zero static sag, I picked up the bike last week from the dealership, has anyone else noticed this?

Trying to separate preload and dampening so there's no confusion here. I'm interested in how to remove some of the bouncy feeling from the bike, obviously I can increase the dampening, however this may not be enough...
Your "rider on" sag is about where it should be. With 140mm of travel 40-45mm sag is about right. Play with the damping. The adjuster adjusts rebound damping. Add damping 'til it feels controlled. Play with the adjustment to see how it feels. Go a half turn or so at a time. See how it feels then go another half etc. Try both extremes, too much and too little to see how they feel. You won't hurt anything.

Right will be right and more is not better, you want the minimum damping that gives the rear a controlled feeling. You find that by going too far and then backing off. Too much rebound will make the rear end feel stiff as it will "pack down". When you get to that point you just take some damping back out. It's all you can do with the stock shock. Have fun. You learn by trying things.
 

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I'm 83kg and have about 40mm of rider sag which I believe is a pretty good amount to have the suspension sit in the middle of its travel. However I have zero static sag,
Zero static sag (with the rider on sag you have) means the shock is relatively softly sprung, which is good for ride quality and using the available travel, as long as you're not bottoming excessively. Too many things get obsessed about on this forum. Free sag is one of them. What is most important is the sag with you on the bike.

If you were road racing the bike you would want a stiffer spring which would give you more free sag with the same rider on sag (ride height) you have now but ride quality would suffer. All things are compromises.
 

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Thank you very much, I have been struggling to understand why free sag is even a 'thing'. I mean my weight will always be on the bike either through seat or pegs so wouldn't the rider sag be the only thing that matters? Again thanks for your help!
 

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It's a made-up measurement that supposedly tells you whether your spring is too soft or too stiff (signalling that you have used too much or too little pre-load to accommodate your weight). Perhaps more applicable to racing than to ordinary street use, unless you're far outside the average weight of a human being. I liken it to the seemingly never-ending quest to spend large amounts of money for relatively small power gains. Others will of course disagree.
 

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I have a 2016 with the big metal two-winged knob on top of the rear-shock but find it very stiff to turn. Is there an easy way to turn it?


Sent from my BMW R nineT!
 

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I have a 2016 with the big metal two-winged knob on top of the rear-shock but find it very stiff to turn. Is there an easy way to turn it?
Not really but putting the bike on the sidestand and leaning it over to un-weight the rear tire (fully extending the rear shock) while turning the adjuster will help.
 

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I have a 2016 with the big metal two-winged knob on top of the rear-shock but find it very stiff to turn. Is there an easy way to turn it?


Sent from my BMW R nineT!
Un-loading the rear suspension by the method described helps, but I found that the adjuster on my rear shock had partially seized, squirting copious amounts of WD40 down the shaft of the adjuster and winding/unwinding the adjuster made a significant difference.
 

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Bit of a thread resurrection here, but I'm assuming that the suspension adjustment knob should turn by hand? Mine is really stiff and I've been unable to turn it thus far... just want to make sure that I simply need to keep trying and that there's no special tool involved.

Would it help if I had it on the paddock stand?
 

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@learningtofly

Yes the knob on mine
was stiff to use too (oh-errr!). Liberal application of WD40 freed it off. I had to use mole grips (jaws wrapped in cloth) to start to gently turn it back and forwards a little and spray lube down the shaft. It slowly got easier to turn. In the end it was turning reasonably easily.

I am of course assuming you are meaning the preload knob that you find on stock R9T classics?
 

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@learningtofly
Yes the knob on mine
was stiff to use too (oh-errr!). Liberal application of WD40 freed it off. I had to use mole grips (jaws wrapped in cloth) to start to gently turn it back and forwards a little and spray lube down the shaft. It slowly got easier to turn. In the end it was turning reasonably easily.

I am of course assuming you are meaning the preload knob that you find on stock R9T classics?
Yes, that's the one, Dave. I'll try with some WD40 - I think I have a small wrench in the tool box too, so will resort to that if I need to.

I only weigh about 150-155 lbs so allowing another 30 lbs for gear it looks like I'm all the way counterclockwise (at least to begin with). Similarly with the damping (albeit clockwise with the subsequent adjustment)
 

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Why is this chart to skewed to higher weights? The average sized man is off this chart.

It's made for fat germans....

If you're under the minimum weight listed chances are the spring is too stiff, i'm 67kg and had zero sag with no preload on the rear.
It's not much of an issue, the stock suspension is rubbish anyway, upgrade it. it's money well spent
 
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It's made for fat germans....

If you're under the minimum weight listed chances are the spring is too stiff, i'm 67kg and had zero sag with no preload on the rear.
It's not much of an issue, the stock suspension is rubbish anyway, upgrade it. it's money well spent
At the risk of sounding like an asshole... but those are some VERY heavy weights. Pushing over 300lbs is quite heavy. I just feel like there was an error in converting Kg to Lbs or something.

That being said, it may be worth to upgrade the shock regardless. I'm saving money for a track bike but will shift my attention to upgrading the R9t at some point.
 

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At the risk of sounding like an asshole... but those are some VERY heavy weights. Pushing over 300lbs is quite heavy. I just feel like there was an error in converting Kg to Lbs or something.

That being said, it may be worth to upgrade the shock regardless. I'm saving money for a track bike but will shift my attention to upgrading the R9t at some point.
Yes, but 300lb is what? 137kg. that's a rider and a pillion, they come as a dual seat bike so they have to take that into account.
 

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It's made for fat germans....

If you're under the minimum weight listed chances are the spring is too stiff, i'm 67kg and had zero sag with no preload on the rear.
It's not much of an issue, the stock suspension is rubbish anyway, upgrade it. it's money well spent
As a self-proclaimed 'fat German' I am happy to see this thread resurrected and look forward to trying some of the settings in the chart and I thank the OP for the effort. Suspension is rediculous black arts for me and I have read everything on the R9T stock shock from way too hard to rediculously soft. From 'change it before you bring it home' to those that seem to vary happily co-exist with it. So... grain of salt time and I'll dial some of these in once we hit riding season and judge for myself.

Strudel (with extra flaky crust) and schnitzel time! Prost!
 
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