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As a self-proclaimed 'fat German' I am happy to see this thread resurrected and look forward to trying some of the settings in the chart and I thank the OP for the effort. Suspension is rediculous black arts for me and I have read everything on the R9T stock shock from way too hard to rediculously soft. From 'change it before you bring it home' to those that seem to vary happily co-exist with it. So... grain of salt time and I'll dial some of these in once we hit riding season and judge for myself.

Strudel (with extra flaky crust) and schnitzel time! Prost!
they're both right in a way, the spring is usually way to hard for the average rider, but when you hit a big bump the damping just blows through, a hard spring and underdamped unit makes for an average ride, if you're lucky enough to be a weight that the spring works for then winding the rebound damping up all the way (it's the only adjustment) will likely keep it under control for sedate riding on smooth roads, but if you ride rough corrugated roads or off road, carry a pillion or some luggage or ride with some gusto.... you should look at upgrading, especially the rear.

No disrespect intended, but the bikes are usually geared around their makers typical "average", Italian bikes are often sprung for jockeys, BMW's are often sprung generously, especially given their GS history and owners who like to load them up, either with armour, luggage, wives, or all three.... just makes sense really. and it would be fine if it wasn't a budget POS and changing the spring was cost effective, which it would be if the damping circuits worked.
 
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2016 R NineT Classic with aluminium tank with weld
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131 Posts
This chart is awesome. It finally made me get off my lazy butt and actually look at how my suspension was currently set. I adjusted the rear shock which either from factory or previous owner was waaaay too stiff. I think he did some bike touring with lots of luggage so may have stiffened the shock up for that. I made it more appropriate for my weight and riding style. I've only been for a quick blat around the local suburb just before the rain came but with the crappy local roads we have in Sydney I felt it was good enough to be able to work out that the ride is now sooooo much more compliant and less teeth shattering and the rear more closely matches the front.

I converted @writersblock's original imperial measurements to metric since we live in a more enlightened society here in Australia ;) and to save anyone else who works with 21st century measurement systems that make sense, the time of converting it themselves, I have reproduced the weight table in kilograms. Full credit to Justin (@writersblock) for taking the time to produce the original chart. I, my butt, my teeth and I'm pretty sure my bike cannot thank you enough! Apologies for the formatting of the table. I couldn't get it to change the column widths no matter what I did.

Spring PreloadShock Rebound
Half TurnsWeight (kgs) with GearHalf TurnsWeight (kgs) with GearLbsLbs
1​
88.86​
1​
95.42​
195.9210.4
2​
92.90​
2​
106.03​
204.8233.8
3​
96.93​
3​
116.63​
213.7257.1
4​
100.97​
4​
127.23​
222.6280.5
5​
105.01​
5​
137.84​
231.5303.9
6​
109.04​
6​
148.44​
240.4327.3
7​
113.08​
7​
159.04​
249.3350.6
8​
117.12​
8​
169.64​
258.2374
9​
121.15​
267.1
10​
125.19​
276
11​
129.23​
284.9
12​
133.27​
293.8
13​
137.30​
302.7
14​
141.34​
311.6
15​
145.38​
320.5
16​
149.41​
329.4
17​
153.45​
338.3
18​
157.49​
347.2
19​
161.52​
356.1
20​
165.56​
365
21​
169.60​
373.9
Gear weight
kgslbs
13.60776​
30​

Spring Preload:
start with knob fully stopped counterlockwise then make half turns
clockwise to the closest approximation of weight

Shock Rebound:
start with screw fully turned clockwise. Set by half turns counterclockwise and then turn an additional 1.5 turns counterclockwise
 

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Thanks for all the excellent info in this thread everyone. I have an Urban GS and I don't have the knob to adjust spring preload. I'm struggling to determine where my preload should be adjust to for around 250 lbs. I don't have any one to help me do the measurements properly and the BMW manual says for 2 up riding there should be 21mm of pre load but I cannot understand where the measurement is taken from based on the tiny diagram in the manual. Does anyone have any suggestions how this chart might convert to number of threads above the spring lock nut on the UGS?
 

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Thanks for all the excellent info in this thread everyone. I have an Urban GS and I don't have the knob to adjust spring preload. I'm struggling to determine where my preload should be adjust to for around 250 lbs. I don't have any one to help me do the measurements properly and the BMW manual says for 2 up riding there should be 21mm of pre load but I cannot understand where the measurement is taken from based on the tiny diagram in the manual. Does anyone have any suggestions how this chart might convert to number of threads above the spring lock nut on the UGS?
The urban has different suspension to the classic so this chart is of no use!
My Urban had too weak a rear spring for my weight (which is similar to your weight).
I installed a new spring of 140n/mm to get to a reasonable preload of 15mm and ride height.
If you take the shock off to replace the spring you will be able to measure the free spring length and mark it on the shock for future adjustment.
The rear springs are a very common size, so you should have no trouble sourcing one fairly cheaply. if you fancy changing. My stock spring was a 120n/mm.
Most other rninet models usually come with a 160n/mm spring I believe, but have 15mm less rear suspension travel.
 

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The urban has different suspension to the classic so this chart is of no use!
My Urban had too weak a rear spring for my weight (which is similar to your weight).
I installed a new spring of 140n/mm to get to a reasonable preload of 15mm and ride height.
If you take the shock off to replace the spring you will be able to measure the free spring length and mark it on the shock for future adjustment.
The rear springs are a very common size, so you should have no trouble sourcing one fairly cheaply. if you fancy changing. My stock spring was a 120n/mm.
Most other rninet models usually come with a 160n/mm spring I believe, but have 15mm less rear suspension travel.
This is super helpful. Thank you Hocks!

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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351 Posts
Sorry meant to post this here but accidentally posted in another thread that wasn't applicable (not sure how that happened!). I was about to order a Wilbers 642 rear shock for my new ninet classic but before parting with $2k Aud I thought i'd play with the stock rear and front forks a bit. I am 72kg and probably closer to 80kg with gear. I felt the rear was like a pogo stick and too firm/harsh - the front also felt too firm. I backed the preload on the rear right off, and increased the rebound damping to half a turn from full. I also backed off the compression on the forks two clicks to 3 and upped the rebound to 6. Feels much more planted and isn't bucking me off anymore over bumps and is far smoother overall . Enough that i'm not sure a rear shock is necessary for now. Static sag was 32mm front, 30mm rear. Will put some more kms on the bike first.
 

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351 Posts
Rode the bike again this evening - definitely a massive improvement in comfort and composure over large and small bumps. The rear feels so much better. I'm going to hold off on a rear shock for sure. Anyone know if they may have changed the rear shock/spring on the MY20 model at all vs prior models? Because of this is bad, then a Wilbers must feel truly amazing .
 

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2018 R Nine T Scrambler Sport
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21 Posts
Hi, I am guessing you have a knob to adjust the spring pre-load, rather than unscrewing the rings of the spring to select, very roughly ! the pre-load. As I have unwound the spring from the setting which appears to have been for 2 Up riding, I will try it on the 11mm for 1 Up riding plus a couple of turns.......
 

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This chart is awesome. It finally made me get off my lazy butt and actually look at how my suspension was currently set. I adjusted the rear shock which either from factory or previous owner was waaaay too stiff. I think he did some bike touring with lots of luggage so may have stiffened the shock up for that. I made it more appropriate for my weight and riding style. I've only been for a quick blat around the local suburb just before the rain came but with the crappy local roads we have in Sydney I felt it was good enough to be able to work out that the ride is now sooooo much more compliant and less teeth shattering and the rear more closely matches the front.

I converted @writersblock's original imperial measurements to metric since we live in a more enlightened society here in Australia ;) and to save anyone else who works with 21st century measurement systems that make sense, the time of converting it themselves, I have reproduced the weight table in kilograms. Full credit to Justin (@writersblock) for taking the time to produce the original chart. I, my butt, my teeth and I'm pretty sure my bike cannot thank you enough! Apologies for the formatting of the table. I couldn't get it to change the column widths no matter what I did.

Spring PreloadShock Rebound
Half TurnsWeight (kgs) with GearHalf TurnsWeight (kgs) with GearLbsLbs
1​
88.86​
1​
95.42​
195.9210.4
2​
92.90​
2​
106.03​
204.8233.8
3​
96.93​
3​
116.63​
213.7257.1
4​
100.97​
4​
127.23​
222.6280.5
5​
105.01​
5​
137.84​
231.5303.9
6​
109.04​
6​
148.44​
240.4327.3
7​
113.08​
7​
159.04​
249.3350.6
8​
117.12​
8​
169.64​
258.2374
9​
121.15​
267.1
10​
125.19​
276
11​
129.23​
284.9
12​
133.27​
293.8
13​
137.30​
302.7
14​
141.34​
311.6
15​
145.38​
320.5
16​
149.41​
329.4
17​
153.45​
338.3
18​
157.49​
347.2
19​
161.52​
356.1
20​
165.56​
365
21​
169.60​
373.9
Gear weight
kgslbs
13.60776​
30​

Spring Preload:
start with knob fully stopped counterlockwise then make half turns
clockwise to the closest approximation of weight

Shock Rebound:
start with screw fully turned clockwise. Set by half turns counterclockwise and then turn an additional 1.5 turns counterclockwise
this is reverse.. if you follow this lets say you are 180lbs. That means you select #1
The damping all the way to clockwise then choose #1 you will have a slow motion suspension lol
 

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377 Posts
Guys, I am glad that you make use of the chart, but would caution in too much reliance on chart. Yes for most of us it is a simple solution, it would be better if someone csit with setting up of bike. The motocross guys are often good with this. I had someone help me and it improved ride quality. Set up of original at factory is for weight of 80 to 85kg, same wirh bicycles. With a bicycle there is no chart if you weigh more than 100kg, then it is all about 25% sag. 😄
 

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its actually very simple. im 180lbs and i did clockwise all the way for preload. then on the rebound counter clockwise all the way then to my liking i did 4 full 4 clockwise turns.

i am watching dave moss and he is always telling people have shock static sag.
 

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I am so glad I found this, I just wish I’d seen it before I took my 600 mile ride. Apparently the original /previous owners had left everything at the default or completely closed the damper and preload! So much smoother over bumps now. (It actually feels like there’s a shock in the back now) 🤣
 

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its actually very simple. im 180lbs and i did clockwise all the way for preload. then on the rebound counter clockwise all the way then to my liking i did 4 full 4 clockwise turns.

i am watching dave moss and he is always telling people have shock static sag.
wait so you clockwise your rear preload all the way to increase the spring preload ?! my understanding is that counterclockwise all the way first then clockwise from there according to your weight.
 

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Sorry meant to post this here but accidentally posted in another thread that wasn't applicable (not sure how that happened!). I was about to order a Wilbers 642 rear shock for my new ninet classic but before parting with $2k Aud I thought i'd play with the stock rear and front forks a bit. I am 72kg and probably closer to 80kg with gear. I felt the rear was like a pogo stick and too firm/harsh - the front also felt too firm. I backed the preload on the rear right off, and increased the rebound damping to half a turn from full. I also backed off the compression on the forks two clicks to 3 and upped the rebound to 6. Feels much more planted and isn't bucking me off anymore over bumps and is far smoother overall . Enough that i'm not sure a rear shock is necessary for now. Static sag was 32mm front, 30mm rear. Will put some more kms on the bike first.
Hi Dom,

We're similar in weight so I'm going to replicate your set up:

1. so counterclockwise the preload knob of rear shock all the way (softest), no half turn clockwise at all.
2. clockwise the rebound damping all the way to full, then turn it counterclockwise half a turn.

is my interpretation correct?

Thanks!
T
 

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351 Posts
Hi Dom,

We're similar in weight so I'm going to replicate your set up:

1. so counterclockwise the preload knob of rear shock all the way (softest), no half turn clockwise at all.
2. clockwise the rebound damping all the way to full, then turn it counterclockwise half a turn.

is my interpretation correct?

Thanks!
T
Hi T,

I subsequently upgraded to a Wilbers 642, raised up 40mm, and it was a big, noticeable, improvement, however yes, I believe that is correct. Although I suggest measuring the sag for you in your gear and aiming for 30-40mm of total sag. Set your preload accordingly. There may even be variations in spring stiffness due to production tolerances or running changes etc.

As for the rebound damping, yes, try that and see how you go. Then perhaps find a bumpy road and adjust from there until you find your happy spot. Too much rebound damping can result in the shock 'packing down' over successive bumbs if it doesn't have time to extend so one must be careful of not having too much. You also want the wheel to be able to follow dips in the road. However, I certainly found increasing the rebound damping helped with ride quality a lot.

Good luck and report back.

Cheers, Dom
 

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Hi T,

I subsequently upgraded to a Wilbers 642, raised up 40mm, and it was a big, noticeable, improvement, however yes, I believe that is correct. Although I suggest measuring the sag for you in your gear and aiming for 30-40mm of total sag. Set your preload accordingly. There may even be variations in spring stiffness due to production tolerances or running changes etc.

As for the rebound damping, yes, try that and see how you go. Then perhaps find a bumpy road and adjust from there until you find your happy spot. Too much rebound damping can result in the shock 'packing down' over successive bumbs if it doesn't have time to extend so one must be careful of not having too much. You also want the wheel to be able to follow dips in the road. However, I certainly found increasing the rebound damping helped with ride quality a lot.

Good luck and report back.

Cheers, Dom
Thanks for the quick reply Dom! I'll have to play around with the rebound damping this weekend once I got time to take the bike out.

Curious what made you picked Wilbers 642 instead of 640? does the price difference justify the performance upgrade? Suspension is definitely my next upgrade and I'm torn between Ohlins and Wilbers.

Also does +40mm makes the bike noticeably taller?

Cheers,T
 

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351 Posts
Thanks for the quick reply Dom! I'll have to play around with the rebound damping this weekend once I got time to take the bike out.

Curious what made you picked Wilbers 642 instead of 640? does the price difference justify the performance upgrade? Suspension is definitely my next upgrade and I'm torn between Ohlins and Wilbers.

Also does +40mm makes the bike noticeably taller?

Cheers,T
I chose the 642 because by the time I added the +25mm and height adjust option, as well as the mechanical preload adjustment I don't think there was much price difference between the two and I figured i'm the type of person who always regrets not getting the best, and conversely, never regret buying a higher model etc post purchase.

The height adjust and increase was important to me as I wanted more cornering ground clearance and less trail & rake to make the bike a bit more agile, as well as putting a bit more weight on the front. I am really happy with it now. It doesn't feel too tall - it feels right. I am 179cm.

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