BMW NineT Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Have any U.S. owners recently attempted to have the OEM LED turn signals programmed at their authorized dealership?

While switching the blinker was plug-and-play on older bikes, this isn't the case on mine. I sourced four LED signals to install on my 2019 Classic. Plugging in one causes it to hyper flash, and a lamp error appears on the dash. A GS911 reads the connection as an open circuit — with the LED plugged in. Perhaps the lower power draw, instead of the filament bulb, is causing the control module to read the undercurrent.

I had to source the LEDs (63 13 8 522 499) from Europe because, since August 2017, they've been illegal to purchase in the United States. They don't conform with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108, which regulates all automotive lighting, signaling, and reflective devices here. The safety recall is a scream: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2017/RCLRPT-17E052-6642.PDF

"In certain road and traffic conditions, use of the accessory turn signals may increase the risk of a crash."

At the run-in service, when my tech plugs in the bike to initialize an LED re-program, I'm betting the mothership will block it. Good bet? I'd be grateful to hear about your OEM LED installation experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Interesting -- I bet it's because of the "EFFECTIVE PROJECTED LUMINOUS LENS AREA" requirement. FMVSS 108 is ... long, but I was kind of curious so I skimmed it for discussions on turn signals, and it looks (to me) like the lens area for motorcycle turns signals is required to be huge: 3 1/2 sq. in. or 2258 sq. mm. This is (surprisingly) 58 sq. mm larger than is required for cars. In case you were curious, the brake light (sorry "stop lamp") size is the same for cars and motorcyles: 5000 sq. mm.

Need a dose of engineering requirements to brighten your day? Try this: Each lamp must meet the minimum effective projected luminous lens area requirements for the applicable vehicle type/size as indicated in the following table. The area consists of the effective light-emitting surface of each lamp or compartment measured on a plane normal to the axis of the vehicle excluding reflex reflector which is not obstructed by an opaque object such as mounting screw, mounting ring or an ornamental bezel or trim. This includes the area of rings or other configuration (raised portions) molded in the lens as part of the total effective area even if this area does not contribute significantly to total light output. The effective projected luminous lens area of each lamp or compartment shall be determined by the projection or graphical method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Dealer confirmed — no dice on the LED retrofit on any U.S. bikes. Their computers don't allow it, and U.S. dealers can't even sell them. I guess I'll have four brand new BMW LEDs for sale soon! Based on what I've read here, they should work without hyper flashing or causing lamp errors on the dash for any 2014-'16 model year nineT.
 

·
Registered
2017 R nineT Classic
Joined
·
443 Posts
Based on what I've read here, they should work without hyper flashing or causing lamp errors on the dash for any 2014-'16 model year nineT
That is an incorrect assumption. All bikes will hyperflash if they were shipped with traditional bulbs and you install LEDs. Older bikes are more tolerant of changes in terms of showing lamp errors, but they will still hyperflash. Doesn't matter what model year you have, in the US BMW will no longer set them to LED mode.

If you don't mind hyperflash and you have an older bike, then you are good. Also you'll have an easier time installing resistors on older bikes because you don't have to get the resistance perfect to avoid a lamp error.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Have any U.S. owners recently attempted to have the OEM LED turn signals programmed at their authorized dealership?

While switching the blinker was plug-and-play on older bikes, this isn't the case on mine. I sourced four LED signals to install on my 2019 Classic. Plugging in one causes it to hyper flash, and a lamp error appears on the dash. A GS911 reads the connection as an open circuit — with the LED plugged in. Perhaps the lower power draw, instead of the filament bulb, is causing the control module to read the undercurrent.

I had to source the LEDs (63 13 8 522 499) from Europe because, since August 2017, they've been illegal to purchase in the United States. They don't conform with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108, which regulates all automotive lighting, signaling, and reflective devices here. The safety recall is a scream: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2017/RCLRPT-17E052-6642.PDF

"In certain road and traffic conditions, use of the accessory turn signals may increase the risk of a crash."

At the run-in service, when my tech plugs in the bike to initialize an LED re-program, I'm betting the mothership will block it. Good bet? I'd be grateful to hear about your OEM LED installation experience.
All you need to do is get an item called a Highsider canbus module and wire it into your bike set the dip switches and the code and hyperflashing will go away.
 

·
Registered
2017 R nineT Classic
Joined
·
443 Posts
Yeah but each Highsider only controls 2 channels so you need one for the front and one for the back. Or you could just test the resistance of your current blinkers, then plug up the LED blinkers and find the difference. All that is left is to order the closest resistors you can find to that value and wire them up yourself. Guaranteed way cheaper than the Highsider, but more work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Yeah but each Highsider only controls 2 channels so you need one for the front and one for the back. Or you could just test the resistance of your current blinkers, then plug up the LED blinkers and find the difference. All that is left is to order the closest resistors you can find to that value and wire them up yourself. Guaranteed way cheaper than the Highsider, but more work.
Wire the highsider so one channel takes care of the left side and the other the right one is all you need. I tried all kinds of resistors none worked they would overheat so if you want to set fire to your bike go that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Have any U.S. owners recently attempted to have the OEM LED turn signals programmed at their authorized dealership?

While switching the blinker was plug-and-play on older bikes, this isn't the case on mine. I sourced four LED signals to install on my 2019 Classic. Plugging in one causes it to hyper flash, and a lamp error appears on the dash. A GS911 reads the connection as an open circuit — with the LED plugged in. Perhaps the lower power draw, instead of the filament bulb, is causing the control module to read the undercurrent.

I had to source the LEDs (63 13 8 522 499) from Europe because, since August 2017, they've been illegal to purchase in the United States. They don't conform with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108, which regulates all automotive lighting, signaling, and reflective devices here. The safety recall is a scream: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2017/RCLRPT-17E052-6642.PDF

"In certain road and traffic conditions, use of the accessory turn signals may increase the risk of a crash."

At the run-in service, when my tech plugs in the bike to initialize an LED re-program, I'm betting the mothership will block it. Good bet? I'd be grateful to hear about your OEM LED installation experience.
I have a 2017 9T classic, purchsed new in Texas. Last year, I retro-fitted the OEM LED signals, sourced from Europe for the same rerasons you've noted. My brother rides a 2015 S1KR which shares the same LED signals (same OEM part number). For him, everything was truly plug-n-play (that's what convinced me to changed mine to LED). My 9T throws an error code. I took it to the dealer last year and was told BMW has a computer fix for the earlier models but not yet for the later models. I took my bike to a different dealer last week and was told BWM will not release the computer fix in the U.S. for reasons another poster mentions. Thet want to charge me $750 to add resistors for the fix. I politely declined.

I'm now torn between putting the original bulb signals back on or learning to live with the flashing error code, that covers up other information on the display.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
For what it's worth I used the Rizoma Turn Signal Resistor for CAN Bus by itself, and I found an article somewhere which listed these as 38 ohm, 3 watt resistors, which you can probably find pretty cheap elsewhere. (Sometimes I miss Radio Shack.) These are wired in parallel with the LED turn signals. It's nice that they are small and relatively low wattage, less heat to worry about and less hassle to connect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
For what it's worth I used the Rizoma Turn Signal Resistor for CAN Bus by itself, and I found an article somewhere which listed these as 38 ohm, 3 watt resistors, which you can probably find pretty cheap elsewhere. (Sometimes I miss Radio Shack.) These are wired in parallel with the LED turn signals. It's nice that they are small and relatively low wattage, less heat to worry about and less hassle to connect.
Thanks, @bonafidebob. So just to confirm, you used the Rizoma resistors with BMW's LED signals and have no hyper flashing or lamp errors on the dash?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
I did not use the BMW signals, but rather Rizoma Club 'S' signals. LEDs are tricky beasts when it comes to current and voltage, and sorry but I have no idea whether the Rizoma LEDs have the same characteristics as the BMW turn signals at 12V nominal (though I note that when I check the voltage on the gauges mine runs closer to 14V.) My google fu isn't good enough to find any numbers for either the BMW or Rizoma LED current and voltage characteristics, sorry.

If you're worried, it might be worthwhile to get a cheap rheostat/potentiometer that can handle a few watts, then turn the knob until the signals work properly, then you can measure the resistance and get some small resistors that match. I imagine it will be a little bit tedious to do the trial and error, since you'll need to shut the bike off after each experiment to clear the lamp errors. But once you kind of narrow in on the range you can probably adjust the resistance one way until the lamp error comes on, measure that resistance, then do it the other way until it comes on and measure that, then split the difference.

Or maybe you can talk your BMW dealer into telling you what resistors they use, or whether there's a part number for them, and then just buy the same ones yourself?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top