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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I recently changed from a Triumph Street Twin to a BMW R Nine T Pure.
I love the bike, but, (I’m quite old) after a 50 mile ride my neck aches, wrists ache and my legs ache.
Something I didn’t experience with the Trumpet.
I have put risers (And back towards me) on the BM which helps a little with the neck pains.
Do any other riders of Nine T Pure models find the riding position a little too scrunched up fo comfort.
Must add, I’ve 2 knackered knees a a bad hip on gear change side, plus worn out lower back.
Really like the bike and will give it more time to see if I can get riding without discomfort.
Failing that, it’s back to a Trumpet!
Thanking you,Ken.
 

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Currently i have the Helibar riser along with a plain 20mm riser installed.
It helps out a lot
The bars being as wide as they are and also the fact they don't turn in towards you too much doesn't help.
I would think a narrower bar, with the grips turned closer in towards you would help.
Make sure your arms are relaxed as much as possible, not stretched out too stiff.
That being said, Ive been on some long day trips; 200, 300, even a 400 mile round trip in one day.
This is my second riding season on the bike, so maybe your body just needs to get used to it.

I agree with you not the most comfortable bike.
But I have a lot of fun with it. I think this bike has character. Plus the tank matches my hair!
I'm 66, 5' 11", 176 pounds

Lastly, I do go to the gym 3 times a week for pool aquacize class.
It deals with range of motion, some cardio, stretching., keeps me toned up.
I think this helps me stay in decent shape and allows me to ride the length I do.I would encourage you to try it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi edge130,
The gym idea sounds good in principal, however, I have a few health issues (Other than the ones mentioned in my first post) that don’t encourage gym work, the major one being an Hypertrophic Cardio Myopathy, not got to exert myself too much if I want to stay on my perch.
I used to be very active...running, flying, parachuting and hunting but most of that’s given up now, so what muscles I had are diminishing. Most exercise now is walking the dogs with the occasional range day and the odd deer hunt.
Suppose some gentle weight training might be okay, IF I can motivate myself!
I’m 5’ 5”, 76 and 190lbs.
Thanks for your reply,Ken.
 

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Wrist pain could be due to your wrists being at too much of an angle. Like getting carpal tunnel from typing incorrectly or playing guitar wrong. Try getting the bars set so your wrists are as flat as possible, like playing piano, fingers relaxed. Grips that have more cushion could help if vibrations are aggravating anything.

My shoulders, neck and back are a mess. I do resistance band exercises and lots of stretching to keep pain minimized, no gym needed. A lot of your symptoms point to problems with thoracic mobility, just like me. Google thoracic mobility exercises and you'll learn a lot. Low impact, so if you have other health issues you can still do most of these.

May want to look at booking some sessions with a good physical therapist. They can guide you through the exercises and massage out any nasty trigger points that come up. Licensed massage therapists are good after that, much cheaper, and they can massage out those nasty trigger points too, but aren't doctors like physical therapists.
 

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The majority of the aquacize class are Medicare eligible age folks, including me.
It's part of the Silver Sneakers programs that many gyms offer. It's pretty low impact.
You could check it out if you, your doctor, agree. I have to say I don't get many aches and pains any more and attribute that to staying limber.

You could also have someplace or friends steady the front of the bike for you, loosen up the handlebars and try different positions. Awhile ago I put some painters tape on the bars so I could mark it before the adjustments. You could then use different colors to mark different positions. This way you can always put them back where they were. See if any of the changes help you out.

Actually the first season of riding, I seemed to always pop a few Ibuprofen tablets on rides.
This year I really can't recall having to use them. I always have a small travel size container in my pocket with them, Tylenol, etc. just Incase.

You might have to face that maybe it's not the right bike for you and that out there is something more comfortable for you., more ergonomically friendly.
I sat on a Ducati 950 Multistrada and thought the bars were just perfect, extremely comfortable position- no adjustments/alterations necessary.
Sometimes a great looking bike is not that comfortable.


Good luck to you
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Mass T;
Over the years (20+) I’ve spent much money with Osteopaths and Cairopractics.
No treatment to date has produced much of a result, except if I fall off my wallet now I won’t fall far as it’s much thinner. ;)
I’m told I have a Sciatic nerve problem which sends pain from my back right down my left leg which sometimes won’t allow me much time to lift my left foot from the rest when coming to a stop! Gets dodgy at times as i like to use the back brake to come to a stop.
As I said, I will carry on for several weeks to see if i can get my muscles to recognise the shape I need to be.
Thanks for your input,Ken.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The majority of the aquacize class are Medicare eligible age folks, including me.
It's part of the Silver Sneakers programs that many gyms offer. It's pretty low impact.
You could check it out if you, your doctor, agree. I have to say I don't get many aches and pains any more and attribute that to staying limber.

You could also have someplace or friends steady the front of the bike for you, loosen up the handlebars and try different positions. Awhile ago I put some painters tape on the bars so I could mark it before the adjustments. You could then use different colors to mark different positions. This way you can always put them back where they were. See if any of the changes help you out.

Actually the first season of riding, I seemed to always pop a few Ibuprofen tablets on rides.
This year I really can't recall having to use them. I always have a small travel size container in my pocket with them, Tylenol, etc. just Incase.

You might have to face that maybe it's not the right bike for you and that out there is something more comfortable for you., more ergonomically friendly.
I sat on a Ducati 950 Multistrada and thought the bars were just perfect, extremely comfortable position- no adjustments/alterations necessary.
Sometimes a great looking bike is not that comfortable.
Hi,
Over the course of the last sixteen months I’ve tried different makes and styles of bike (Currently on bike #7!), I’ve had a Honda Retro 1100ES, Honda 1300VTX, Honda 750 Shadow, Ducati Monster, Ducati Scrambler, Triumph Street Twin And now the Beemer.
Really don’t like being on the ‘Chain Gang’, so Beemer ideal, except for fit.
Cheers, Ken.

Good luck to you
 

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Often small changes can result in markedly differently levels of comfort.

Obvious issues/questions:
1. Crap suspension. This bike is no Buick. Your body takes more abuse and you can’t be as relaxed on the bike. As with any bike, upgrading the shock and fixing the forks (upgrade or even, according to some, just lowering the oil weight) isn’t necessarily cheap but can make a big difference in comfort.

2. Foot peg to seat is too tight. There are a number of not too expensive options to drop the pegs a bit. Not only will this relieve your knees a bit, it’ll do the same for your hips.

3. Related to 2:
The thin low seat on the pure. This means less cushion from impacts and, of course, puts your butt closer to your feet. While at your height a thicker seat may be a bad idea, a better cushioned seat might be possible.

4.Bars the wrong shape, the wrong rotation, and/or in the wrong place. Have you tried them rotated at a different angle? Any idea as to how the shape compares to that of the Triumph? I often find bars are too swept back.

5. The skinny hard grips. They are, for me, uncomfortable. Their shape doesn’t allow, for me, as relaxed a grip as I’ve had on other bikes. This plus the front suspension means, again, that my hands and wrists are doing more work than I’d like. You can swap out the grips or use of the many afforproducts to make them more forgiving and give them a bit more diameter.

Good luck!
 

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The BMW can be a little uncomfortable but to be fair 50 miles is bugger all, if you're getting sore in that short a time frame i'd be hesitant to suggest spending money on it, it may end up being more money down the drain....

If your mobility is a little limited, my suggestion would be, and don't laugh because i used these and still do from time to time, after a serious accident that put me out of action for a long time, i'm flexible and able enough to do anything i want now.
Yoga, not just for hipsters or mums, low impact and seriously good for aiding mobility
Pilates, again, certainly not just for latte sipping women who like to socialise in lycra, Pilates will strengthen your core and that can't possibly hurt, with your physicians consent of course.

Changing bikes for fit people can cause aches and pains, your muscles are used to being in certain positions and states, if you're asking them to work outside their usual range they will ache, both yoga and pilates will seriously help, and not just on the bike, obviously.

You say you're "quite old" but i doubt your age is much of an issue, you ride a different bike fine, it's likely your height, if you're scrunched up on the bike, in concert with your bad joints and general mobility, obviously i don't know whether you're aware or have already tried them, nor do i know if you're even physically capable, though i suspect you are, but i would always suggest improving your muscle fitness and flexibility before spending bad money after good.
From my experience progress will come rather quickly too, i hope it does, nothing worse than compromising on what you like/want especially when you've already spent money on buying a new bike.

Good luck mate
 

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Hi you may want to try a RnineT Scrambler or the Urban the wheel sizes are the same as the Triumph
the Pure, the Racer and the the Classic all have different size wheels and pitch / rake etc. in the front
(this may be the reason).
if you have a 19 inch in the front you are sort of sitting in a more upright position the scramblers and Urban may help

I have a classic and my wrist and palms sometimes hurt and thats cause I put a lot of pressure leaning forward from the riding position
 

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My view is that perhaps you need to try something along the lines of lowering the footpegs, Wunderlich do lowering kits which are easy to fit. Hopefully this would help a lot. However if that doesn't do the trick I'd advise caution about throwing any more money at the bike. As much as I love the R nineT motorcycle I fully accept it isn't for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi,
Plenty of info there to consider, which I will, especially working on the body.
Also will look at lowering the footrests. Before I bought this bike I was under the impression that all R Nines has adjustable footrests, but, not mine.
Thanks much for all replies.
Regards,Ken.
 

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I'm probably older than the OP.

When I bought my R9T, I would often get a sore neck and shoulders after riding more than an hour. A sore butt as well thanks to the horrible stock seat. My knees hurt from non-adjustable stock footpegs that were too far forward.

My solution was to do the opposite of the OP. I installed lower, narrower bars; added a wider, firmer and better sculpted Sargent seat; and got adjustable footpegs, which I adjusted down and rearward. The happy result was a "sport touring" riding posture that rotated my entire body forward and took away the stress on my upper body. If not for those changes, I would have sold my R9T long ago. With these changes, I can easily ride three to four hours without a stop.
 

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I have an R9T Pure and a 72 R75/5. the R75 is more comfortable, mostly the bar shape and position, and the seat. But the 9T has more creature comforts. I did Wilburs suspension, and 20mm risers and it better, but I think there may be a better set of bars, with a little more rise and a little more sweep back.
 

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I'm 64 and have ridden my R9T Scrambler everyday since I purchased it in July 2019. I have been riding for a long time and traded a F700GS for this bike. Before that I had a Kawasaki Versys and rode every type of HD made between 1987 and 2003 (I worked as an engineer and later a production manager at HD). I've lost track of all the bikes I rode and owned prior to working at HD, but I covered every style. Every bike will need some ergonomic adjustments to fit and be comfortable when riding for longer periods. I am fairly fit; I weight train 3 times per week and try to get some walking in every week. I also do some modified yoga when motivated. I have very little problems riding the scrambler. I have 20 mm risers, but would prefer a 1 1/4" rise. I have grip puppies over the grips and I always use a cramp buster. The seat is hard, but either it has broken in or my butt has adjusted because it feels fine now for 1-2 hour rides. I use sheep skin for longer trips. At your height, lowering the pegs will put more pressure on the bottom inside of your thighs. If I was you, I would start with Rox 2" risers and angle them back towards the seating position. I would also put some grip puppies on and maybe a cramp buster. All of this is pretty inexpensive. I wouldn't mess with the seat until I had made all the ergonomic changes to the grip position. Once you do that you can tell if the seat needs to be changed. Yes the pegs are high, the seat is hard, and the suspension is not the best, but work on your hands, arms, and back position first. Once these are satisfactory you can make a better assessment on the more expensive changes.

One other thing, a small windscreen such as Dart, or (my favorite) National Cycles Flyscreen will lower fatigue and upper body aches by reducing the wind pressure on your chest. It will even help your wrists and arms.

Whatever it takes to keep riding! Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm 64 and have ridden my R9T Scrambler everyday since I purchased it in July 2019. I have been riding for a long time and traded a F700GS for this bike. Before that I had a Kawasaki Versys and rode every type of HD made between 1987 and 2003 (I worked as an engineer and later a production manager at HD). I've lost track of all the bikes I rode and owned prior to working at HD, but I covered every style. Every bike will need some ergonomic adjustments to fit and be comfortable when riding for longer periods. I am fairly fit; I weight train 3 times per week and try to get some walking in every week. I also do some modified yoga when motivated. I have very little problems riding the scrambler. I have 20 mm risers, but would prefer a 1 1/4" rise. I have grip puppies over the grips and I always use a cramp buster. The seat is hard, but either it has broken in or my butt has adjusted because it feels fine now for 1-2 hour rides. I use sheep skin for longer trips. At your height, lowering the pegs will put more pressure on the bottom inside of your thighs. If I was you, I would start with Rox 2" risers and angle them back towards the seating position. I would also put some grip puppies on and maybe a cramp buster. All of this is pretty inexpensive. I wouldn't mess with the seat until I had made all the ergonomic changes to the grip position. Once you do that you can tell if the seat needs to be changed. Yes the pegs are high, the seat is hard, and the suspension is not the best, but work on your hands, arms, and back position first. Once these are satisfactory you can make a better assessment on the more expensive changes.

One other thing, a small windscreen such as Dart, or (my favorite) National Cycles Flyscreen will lower fatigue and upper body aches by reducing the wind pressure on your chest. It will even help your wrists and arms.

Whatever it takes to keep riding! Good Luck!
Hi Brucester,
First off... never heard of a ‘Cramp Buster’ but, I have have fitted handlebar risers, 1” up and about 1 1/4” back, much better, but would still like to come higher and backer (Made that word up to suit). I’ve also fitted Grip Puppies (Fit these to all bikes I get) and they do stop odd fingers going white and numb.
Will persevere for a while now and see how things go.
Thanks for your input.
Regards,Ken.
 

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Hi Brucester,
First off... never heard of a ‘Cramp Buster’ but, I have have fitted handlebar risers, 1” up and about 1 1/4” back, much better, but would still like to come higher and backer (Made that word up to suit). I’ve also fitted Grip Puppies (Fit these to all bikes I get) and they do stop odd fingers going white and numb.
Will persevere for a while now and see how things go.
Thanks for your input.
Regards,Ken.

This is a "CrampBuster" also called a Throttle Rocker". you lean your palm on it rather than gripping the tube.
s-l640.jpg
 
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