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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm all about being self sufficient when riding as much as possible, here is an example of what tools and how I change a tube on the NineT. In the end you have to figure out what methods work for you but this can hopefully help you get started.
Patching a tube with a simple nail or screw puncture is a good option too but I'm not going into that just yet, no sense in waisting a $30 tube, I'm sure someday I'll have the opportunity to give an example. ;)



Here is what I'm using to do roadside tire repairs.




From left to right:

The black metal tube is from a small floor jack I have in the garage, any metal tube about the same size will do, you'll need it to add leverage to the the tools I carry to remove the real wheel.

13mm socket, any brand will do. You need this to remove the front brake calipers to remove the wheel, a wrench won't work.



Next up, Star-Pro Pivot Head Torx Wrench Set, 6 Pc | Motion Pro, this torx wrench set is the best I've found, covers most fasteners on a BMW R1200 bike, well designed, packs very small and has proven to be very durable after years of use.
A T-40 for the exhaust hanger bolt, T-45 for the exhaust clamp and T-50 for removing the rear wheel is all that's needed, though I carry the whole set as part of my kit.


Hex Axle Tool to remove the front axle
Hex Axle Tool 17,19,22,24 mm, Chromoly | Motion Pro



Adapter 24mm to 3/8" Drive - this is to use your 24mm combo wrench with the 13mm socket to remove the front calipers. Much smaller and lighter than bringing a socket driver.
T-6 Combo Lever Adapter 24mm to 3/8 In Drive | Motion Pro



12mm wrench. Mine is the ratcheting kind, but a standard one will do. Could probably even just use a multi-tool like the Gerber Freehand Multitool 22-01517 to remove the nut on the tube valve stem. That's all it's needed for.



Tube Snake, this is a handy tool to pull the tube stem through the tube, I can't find there brand I have, bought it years ago, but this should work just the same. Worth every penny.
BikeMaster Tire Valve Stem Puller - Motorcycle Superstore

Valve Core remover. You need something like this to remove... The Valve Core. :D
TPMS Core Tool | Valve Stem Repair Tools | VA173


A Bead Breaker is needed since I couldn't break the bead using my body weight and feet. Using the side stand also isn't possible since there's no center stand. This tool makes breaking the bead effortless, painless and fast.
BeadPro Tire Bead Breaker and Lever Tool Set | Motion Pro

Hotel Key cards, or used up gift card, or some of those unwanted credit cards will do. These are to protect your fancy black wheels. I bought and tried these plastic rim protectors Rim Protectors | Motion Pro, and they DID NOT work, I couldn't get them onto the wheel with the bead still seated.


This stand works perfectly on the ninet, comes with the needed velcro wrap to lock the front brake, and packs small. I covered the part that the bike rests on with shrink tubing to avoid scratches and give it more grab.
Enduro Star Trail Stand


There's lots of options when it comes to compressors, I use one of these SLIME – Worldwide Leader in Tire Care – Repairing a flat tire? Slime Tire & Tube Sealant » Catalog » Catalog Products » Tire Top Off (40020). It packs very small, proven to work well and cost $10 at walmart or online. I cut off the standard auto cigarette lighter plug and added a SAE plug that goes into the pigtail I have directly wired to my battery. This pump will NOT work plugged into the BMW accessory outlet.


Small eyeglass spay bottle, filled with a 25% dish soap, 75% water solution.


Amazon is a good place to source many of these tools for much less than retail price, as usual.


Ok, lets get on with actually changing a tube. Once you have your kit together I highly suggest practicing doing it, reading about it is one thing, doing it is what will make getting a flat a non-issue. While those that would rather call roadside assistance and are still waiting for a tow truck, you will have been riding for hours already and have forgot about the flat.
It's not difficult, just takes practice.


First of all, park the bike on a flat surface, get your tools laid out and ready to go. Start with using the velcro wrap that came with the trail stand to lock the front brake lever nice and tight.



The grab the Trail Stand, put it together and size up where you'll need to insert the R-clip to get the correct height, this is where I chose to put it, lifting the wheel far enough off the ground to be able to remove and install it with plenty of room. For the front, no r-clip was needed, the compacted height was just perfect to lift the front wheel.





Test out your height, with your hand on the bars push forward and to left, like on a 45º angle if you were sitting in the saddle.
(photo credit goes to Bonkorama, thank you for your help today! and yes I'm wearing flip flops for this test, I DO live in California after all...) ;)






This will lift up the rear wheel, transferring the weight to the side stand and front tire, put the stand where shown, this was the most secure spot I found while experimenting yesterday. The hook on the stand will lock into the joint, on the round thingy of the swing arm, gently transfer the weight back to the stand.






OK, now you have your bike with the rear wheel off the ground, remember, you'll be working on this bike, if done correctly you should be able to give the bike a steady shake, it shouldn't feel like it could topple over easily. You will be working underneath this, BE SURE it's secure, if it does't feel right, push the bike forward, take the weight off the stand and start over. Do it again until it feels right.



The bike is stable and ready to remove the wheel.

Take the bike off the stand.
Now that you know where the sweet spot with the location the stand should be and the angle it should be at, it's time to remove the exhaust and loosen the wheel, something we don't want to do with the bike on the stand.


Loosen clamp with handy dandy Torx wrench, then remove pipe hanger bolt, wiggle pipe off cat pipe, set asiside. If on the side of the road, for gods sakes lay down you riding jacket for the pipe to rest on. ;)






Now, slightly loosen all 5 bolts, using the tube extension you have on the Star Pro wrenches. Remove 3 of the 5 bolts, leaving the other 2 finger tight.


Put the bike back up onto the stand, in that same sweet spot you've found, the one you'd let your kid sit under it while it's on it.

















Now that it's ready to go, take the bottom most bolt out first, then, gently pushing the wheel towards the axle from the center of the wheel remove the second bolt using the long end of the star pro wrench.
Remember, if by chance the bike was to fall, it won't fall towards you because of the side stand and locked front wheel, it could however knock over the trail stand if you did it wrong. In other words, just don't put any of your body under the rear brake rotor or swing arm and be gentle. Nothing should be scary, caution is good though since there's no safety catch for the stand.
Nothing you do now should shake the bike more than you already tested with the wheel on, remember that, get on with it, but be careful!









Tire off, bike sitting happily, people driving/riding by you on the side of the road saying "bummer he got a flat, but that guy has his sh!t together!"

Mark tire/wheel with a sharpie pen or something. Or take a photo of the tire/wheel to document where the tire is located on the wheel so you don't screw up the balance. The valve stem is a good place to take notice of where the tire is located in relation to the wheel.



Remove tube valve core stem.









Remove tube retaining nut.







Get out the awesome MP Bead Breakers and your plastic cards.







Spray edge of tire with a liberal amount of the soap solution.









Start with one key card and the bead breakers, shove the card in between the wheel and tire as far as you can go, then put the BB's together at the head, but leaving them opened up. Jam them in-between the card and the tire. Push BB's together, pushing the tire down and apart from the wheel. I needed to open the BB's again and push them further into the tire/wheel, after this pushing together of the BB's, the bead popped off and the tire was separated on the side I'm working on.





With your hands push around the tire finishing the separation.


Flip tire over and repeat separating the tire and wheel.



Now flip the BB tools around and insert a key card between the tire/wheel. I generally start about 4 inches from the valve stem with the first lever and put the second one 2-3 inches down going clockwise.
In order to make this an easy process the tire has to slide down into the center of the wheel, keeping the valve stem away from where the tire will pull down into the center of the wheel is better, especially if you're going to try and patch it first.
The lip on the BB lever should be facing down when using , that lip is going to help pull the tire around the wheel.

Make sure that opposite the levers where you are starting the tire is pushed down towards the center of the wheel by the spokes. The diameter is smaller there and give the tire the ability to flex out and around the wheel. This is the important part of making removing a tire with short hand levers easy.
Push down the lever.


 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Grab you other card, put it in place as close to the lever still in between the tire/wheel as possible or moving clockwise around the wheel. Don't try to "grab" too much of the tire. The key is to take small steps when adding levers, take small amounts of the tire off at a time. The more you try and take at one go, the more force it will take to remove it. Nothing should take great amounts of force, if you're sweating you're doing it wrong. The OEM Metzler tires are actually very soft and not hard to remove at all, especially with soapy water on them.






Repeat moving levers down, leapfrogging if need be taking as little as tire as you can at a time. It should really be much easier as you move down and take only a minute.








Congratulations, you are ready to change your tube! See, it wasn't that hard.

OK, on your first time, maybe it was, but trust me, try it a few more times and it will go fast.










Push in the valve stem in while at the same time lifting the tire from the wheel, grabbing the tube and pulling it out.














Replace or patch tube.

Generally I will slightly inflate the tube, not quite full so it's tight, but not un-inflated completely like a new tube will be. You won't have the valve core in at this time anyways so it won't keep and pressure. This will help with getting the tube in without folds or twists.

Get out the tube snake, insert it from the inside side of the tire, again lifting the tire, reaching in with a couple fingers and grab the other end of the snake. Pull it out so it's looped through the wheel like this.









Lay the tube out on the tire, rolling the valve stem towards the center of the wheel so you can connect the snake to the stem. Roll the snake between you thumb and finger to screw it in.










Pull up tire and stuff the tube inside, keeping the stem near the hole in the wheel. Pull on snake to bring the stem closer to the hole, finish installing tube in tire. Now finish getting the valve stem into the wheel, pull hard on the snake, if it doesn't pop in, lift up tire and help it move while pulling on the snake.









After it's all seated, remove the snake and install the retaining nut for the valve stem, finger tight is good. Then install Valve core and slightly inflate the tube. It shouldn't be fully tight but have some tension on it when you reach in and feel it. This is to avoid giving your self a pinch flat while using the levers to mount the tire in the wheel, I believe than having a little pressure helps avoid this annoying thing that can happen if the tube gets caught in between the lever and the wheel.



Line the tire up with the valve stem on the wheel like you noted earlier to keep the tire balance correct. You did that right?
Now, spray the tire again with the soapy water and get your card and levers all set, starting with two this time and at about 6 and 9 o'clock. This is just to get you started, it's easier to start this way to get the tire down in the center of the rim.






After the first pull of the levers there won't be much tension on the tire, I will use one knee to hold one side, remove that lever and move it up going clockwise.
Keep moving your way around with the levers, they should be facing with the curved lip facing down this time, to help grab onto the wheel and pull the tire over it.




Since these particular OEM tires are very soft I was ble to use my knees to hold it down while moving levers and keep it in the center of the wheel. This is another part where you have to do what works for you, you could move in small amounts and use the levers like you did taking it off, or use your whole body to help it along.











Finish it off, being careful not to put any more of the lever inside the tire as needed for the lip to grab the wheel, you wouldn't want to give yourself a pinch flat and have to do it all over again a half hour down the road. That sucks.







Once done, inflate the tire with your air compressor, don't bother with those C02 things, by the time you carry enough of them to inflate you tire a couple times if things don't go right, you've already taken enough space and spent enough money you might as well have something that doesn't run out.



That's it! Now carefully install the wheel back on the bike, after doing a gentle shake test to be sure it's still stable. I put one axle nut in the wheel with the star pro tool holding it in and lined it up to the final drive, using my feet to support the wheel at the angle it sits while using the trail stand. Again, careful not to put my body under the brake rotor, the first thing that would hit the group if it fell.
Line it up and tighten the one bolt, then install the rest, just finger tight with the wrench, you tighten it up snug AFTER the bike is off the stand.
Push handlebars, take bike off stand, tighten bolts in a criss cross pattern. The manual calls for 60nm of torque on the axle bolts, with the extension tube you can get the bolts very close to spec with the star-pro wrenches. Close enough I've never needed to tighten one after using these tools. Of course use your own judgement.


Reinstall the pipe, tightening up the hanger bolt first and the pipe clamp last. Remove front wheel brake lock strap.

You've now avoided being at the mercy of a tow truck and taken care of yourself.



Front wheel.
Put bike in 1st gear.
I'm not doing a full demonstration, but here where I found the trail stand fully retracted goes nicely to lift the wheel.
You will turns the bars all the way to the left and push up back and to the left side, again at a 45º angle to the rear of the bike.



Again do a safety check to be sure the bike is solid while on the stand.

Take stand off and remove both calipers with the 24mm combo wrench, the 24mm to 3/8" Drive and the 13mm socket. Pull calipers away from wheels and let dangle.








Then loosen the axle pinch bolts on the forks with the T-45 Star pro wrench. Then use the Hex Axle Tool with the Combo Wrench to loosen the axle, giving it one full turn.

Put the bike back onto the stand and while standing in front of the bike so it can't fall on you if something happens, remove axle while supporting the wheel with your other hand.
Remove wheel and repair or replace tube. Install the wheel in a reverse order. Wheel held up to bike, install axle, snugly tight, remove bike from stand, tighten axle, tighten pinch bolts, use the spoon side of the combo wrench to spread the brake pads maing it easier/possible to instal them back on to the bike.
Once installed, be sure to pump the brakes back up before riding!


That's about it, with practice this will not be a long tedious process, 20 minutes start to finish with either tire one you get the hang of it. I assure you it took a heck of a lot longer to write this out that it should be for anyone to just do it. Feel free to ask any questions or add in tips and tricks you've learned while fixing a tire. This is not THE way to do it, just A way to do it
Go get the tools you need and get to practicing, not only is taking care of yourself very satisfying, my girl says it's attractive for men to be able to fix their own tires. :D
 

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Finn never broke a sweat today showing me how to do this first-hand.
I have to quote him... he said "If your sweating, your not doing it right."
I'll confirm that he IS right, this is something you can and should do yourself.
I'm gonna.
I already ordered all the tools.
Thanks FINN!

BTW. Finn is a great guy for making his tutorials for us. I'm sure we all agree.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Was nice hanging out with you too today, looking forward to your photos of a tube change DIY!
BTW, tutorials are not my strong point, I'm in flip flops and my underwear is showing for christ's sake. lol

Here's a legendary tire change DIY from neduro, a Dakar professional rider.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

or paste this code into google for more information on changing tires, lots of methods to find out what works best for you.

site:advrider.com, tire changing
 

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Roadside

First of all, THANKS to Lost Rider for that wonderful tutorial with pics. :)
As extra insurance, I use a strong belt or strap to secure the side stand in the lowered position, so that it can't retract even if the bike shifts. Drill a hole in the foot of the side stand to use as an anchor point. There are 4 empty bolt holes under the engine. They can be used to mount a GS skid plate. Use the bolt hole just forward of the oil filter on the left side as another anchor point. You could also strap the side stand to the front wheel. (if you're removing the rear)
I have become very fond of hard chrome plated tire levers, as they are very easy to slip into place, and resist rust. There is a tool that can be used as a lever, and then hooked around a spoke to keep the bead from slipping off, and it will free up one of your hands. If you're riding alone, think about it.
I use a small valve core remover which doubles as a valve stem cap. The plastic rim protectors helped me after breaking the bead, and again when levering the tire back onto the rim. They are wide enough to use 2 levers and take TINY BITES, as Lost Rider has correctly advised us.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
First of all, THANKS to Lost Rider for that wonderful tutorial with pics. :)
As extra insurance, I use a strong belt or strap to secure the side stand in the lowered position, so that it can't retract even if the bike shifts. Drill a hole in the foot of the side stand to use as an anchor point. There are 4 empty bolt holes under the engine. They can be used to mount a GS skid plate. Use the bolt hole just forward of the oil filter on the left side as another anchor point. You could also strap the side stand to the front wheel. (if you're removing the rear)
I have become very fond of hard chrome plated tire levers, as they are very easy to slip into place, and resist rust. There is a tool that can be used as a lever, and then hooked around a spoke to keep the bead from slipping off, and it will free up one of your hands. If you're riding alone, think about it.
I use a small valve core remover which doubles as a valve stem cap. The plastic rim protectors helped me after breaking the bead, and again when levering the tire back onto the rim. They are wide enough to use 2 levers and take TINY BITES, as Lost Rider has correctly advised us.

Right on, thanks for sharing your tricks and tips, you're right securing the side stand is a great idea, and your method makes total sense! I'll get what I need to do just that and add it to my kit, or just use a ROK strap, something I usually have on the bike when traveling.
I like the looks of the lever that has the spoke hook, would make things easier when solo for sure, I'm so used to changing tubes on wheels with the brake rotor or sprocket on there I usually let them hold the levers for me once they have tension on them.



Keep the input coming folks, many ways to refine and improve doing this to make it easier and safer!

Cheers
 

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Hi lost rider
Great detailed thread on
Repairing a punture.
I like the stand you used to prop bike up.
Did you buy or make this item.?
Cheers piston.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi lost rider
Great detailed thread on
Repairing a punture.
I like the stand you used to prop bike up.
Did you buy or make this item.?
Cheers piston.

Thanks!

The stand is a Enduro Star Trail Stand, the link of where to get it is at the beginning of my first post. :D
 

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I would not be able to do this in a full equipped garage, not to speak of doing this on the road with emergency tools....:eek:
 

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Excellent tutorial . . thank you very much. ;)

Will the nineT's battery have enough power to run the compressor for one tube repair?
Is it necessary to start the motor to keep the battery charged during the 'pump-up'? (Safely done when the wheel is back on the ground of course).
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Excellent tutorial . . thank you very much. ;)

Will the nineT's battery have enough power to run the compressor for one tube repair?
Is it necessary to start the motor to keep the battery charged during the 'pump-up'? (Safely done when the wheel is back on the ground of course).
You're welcome!

Generally, if your battery is in good condition there's no reason why there's not enough juice to get the tire inflated without draining it.
Now with my particular pump at least, on the large rear tire once you start getting closer to running pressures it starts running slower and I will start the bike for the last minute or two, just to speed up the process.

Remember, it's a (mostly) air cooled motor so you don't really want to let it sit there and idle for long periods of time, but running it for 1-2 minutes towards the end of the fill up won't hurt it.
With the soft OEM Metzler tire and using the soapy water it didn't take much beyond the 36psi running pressure for the bead to seat, so pumping it way up wasn't needed. It's a good idea to have a small air pressure gauge in your kit too and not trust the one on the pump.

These are all things you should try out at home first since all BMW batteries aren't always equal, even brand new ones (had more than one bad OEM battery before), and various pumps will work differently.





I would not be able to do this in a full equipped garage, not to speak of doing this on the road with emergency tools....:eek:

I'd be willing to bet you could if motivated enough. :D
 

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thanks Finn, great tutorial - I've never had to repair a tire on a bike before, only watched a mate plug a tubeless during a trip .... this'll help me heaps :). Thanks Bonk for your photo skills ;) gotta do some tool shopping now
 
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