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Thanks!



The stand is a Enduro Star Trail Stand, the link of where to get it is at the beginning of my first post. :D


So, my enduro star trail stand arrived. I have been trying to connect the stand to the anchor point whilst pushing the bike up and onto the side stand and front wheel. I am having great difficulty doing it solo.
Will try again tomorrow. I think it comes down to having enough confidence in pushing the bike up with right hand whilst using left hand to insert the stand.
Very tricky indeed!


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I think it comes down to having enough confidence in pushing the bike up with right hand whilst using left hand to insert the stand.
^This
I had to practice a few times to get it right.
Not to mention trying to place the stand just right while in a half bent-over stance!
But keep practicing so you'll be confident when you really need to do it. :eek:k:
 

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^This
I had to practice a few times to get it right.
Not to mention trying to place the stand just right while in a half bent-over stance!
But keep practicing so you'll be confident when you really need to do it. :eek:k:


I guess I'm worried the side stand will buckle and or crumple under the full weight of the bike whilst trying to find the sweet spot with the enduro stand


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I have to say that when I read the phenomenal post from "Lost Rider" a year or so ago - - I went out and purchased all the tools, Tubes, Patches etc. he recommended - including the stand. I have tested the stand and figured out where to put it - and I am confident it will work well. Thankfully - I have not had the occasion to test it out in real life situations.

A question for the group - - Has anyone actually flatted on the road and repaired thier tire on a highway or roadside location? Just Curious!
 

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I have to say that when I read the phenomenal post from "Lost Rider" a year or so ago - - I went out and purchased all the tools, Tubes, Patches etc. he recommended - including the stand. I have tested the stand and figured out where to put it - and I am confident it will work well. Thankfully - I have not had the occasion to test it out in real life situations.

A question for the group - - Has anyone actually flatted on the road and repaired thier tire on a highway or roadside location? Just Curious!

I too went out an bought all the gear for a 3 week tour in mind. With 2 spare tubes, the increase in weight and additional bag to carry is substantial.
Didn't take it in the end. Didn't get a flat either. Thankfully.


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So, my enduro star trail stand arrived. I have been trying to connect the stand to the anchor point whilst pushing the bike up and onto the side stand and front wheel. I am having great difficulty doing it solo.
Will try again tomorrow. I think it comes down to having enough confidence in pushing the bike up with right hand whilst using left hand to insert the stand.
Very tricky indeed!


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I never had any luck with the "push the bars" method. I lifted my 9T onto its stand facing the rear and using the passenger peg as a grab handle. See here:


http://www.ninetowners.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/48938-600-mile-maintenance.html#post129394
 

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Used this post today ...

Thanks very much for this post Lost!
I had a puncture flat (metal still in the tire) and didn't realize it until a few days later when I lowered my RNineT down from the Bursig stand Friday night. I'd planned on my quick little circuit trip on River Bend Rd. (Northern VA) on a beautiful Friday evening in VA ( a rarity in July) when my wife returned home and informed me my rear tire looked flat. Called BMW Roadside assistance Saturday morning and they were going to send out Al's Towing service (no kidding) with all of two stars review on Yelp. I asked them to use the same service I used previously, but that service couldn't get to it until Tuesday morning. I'd just purchased the "Haynes Service and Repair Manual for R nineT, Scrambler, Pure, Racer and Urban G/S '14 to '18" with the intent to become more knowledgeable about my R NineT. Hey ... seemed like someone was trying to tell me something, so I took the plunge and decided to remove the tire and take it to Bob's BMW in Maryland for their Saturday 'first come first served' service day. Long story short, I got there around noon and they would not be able to fix my flat until Tuesday or Wednesday of the next week, so I walked out with a new tube. It just so happens, I'd remembered reading your post years ago and ordered the Motion Pro breaker bars and the BikeMaster Tire valve puller late on Friday evening - and the Motion Pro breaker bars arrived Sunday morning outside my door before 9 AM - thanks Amazon Prime! Took my time, and barring a pinch flat, my R NineT has the new tube installed and ready to go - after I re-install the muffler tomorrow night. I need some high temperature grease to re-install the muffler. Couple of comments on the post - great advice about not having to sweat, if your sweating, you're doing something wrong. When I was putting the tire back on it was very difficult and I restarted coming from both sides because the tire was stretched very tight with about a quarter of the tire to go. I was also standing on the tire instead of using my knees - so the bead was a bit low and not optimally placed. Once the tire was on and I started to re-inflate the tube, there were several loud pops as the bead settled in place. Also, it sounded as if the air was leaking from within the tube when I was re-inflating the new tube and there were bubbles around the stem. I'd checked the tube before installing it, so I knew it was fine before I tried to install it. I then noticed there were bubbles around the spokes and at that point I realized the air I was hearing and the bubbles were due to the air being forced out of the tire by the tube that was expanding - the 'hissing' would stop as soon as I stopped pumping my bicycle pump. I checked the tube pressure regularly as I inflated the tube, so I knew the tube seemed to be maintaining pressure.
Again, thanks very much for your post and pictures. Sharing your knowledge is very admirable, so I hope lots of good karma is coming your way.
 

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I was heading to Monmouth from LLangolen, North Wales, this Saturday, on my way from Dublin, but only got as far as near Oswestry before Mr. Nail made his entrance. BMW Rescue took me and the bike to my mum’s near Swindon, which is quite a distance, 126 miles according to Go Ogle. The next day they sent a taxi to take me to a car hire place where a BMW car was waiting for me, except I changed it for a small Toyota thing. They took my bike to North Oxford BMW, 25 miles. I then drove to my hotel in Sutton, London, paid for by my company because I was working in their south London offices this week. They only just returned my bike back to me this morning!

On Sunday I’m heading to Paris, then Brussels and Cologne for a little EUro tour with the missus.

When I get back to Ireland I want to get rid of these bloody tubes so I can repair any future punctures myself with one of those magical kits with plugs and CO2 canisters.

I guess you have to remove the wheels, remove the tyres, put some gunge down, add some tape and then let it all set before putting the tyres back on the wheels and the wheels back on the bike.
 

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@Lost Rider


My hat is off to you and I salute you. :eusa_clap::eusa_clap::eusa_clap::10:



I haven't changed a tubed tire on the road since the early 1970s. Nowadays I just won't have tubed tires on a bike.
 

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Grab you other card, put it in place as close to the lever still in between the tire/wheel as possible or moving clockwise around the wheel. Don't try to "grab" too much of the tire. The key is to take small steps when adding levers, take small amounts of the tire off at a time. The more you try and take at one go, the more force it will take to remove it. Nothing should take great amounts of force, if you're sweating you're doing it wrong. The OEM Metzler tires are actually very soft and not hard to remove at all, especially with soapy water on them.






Repeat moving levers down, leapfrogging if need be taking as little as tire as you can at a time. It should really be much easier as you move down and take only a minute.








Congratulations, you are ready to change your tube! See, it wasn't that hard.

OK, on your first time, maybe it was, but trust me, try it a few more times and it will go fast.










Push in the valve stem in while at the same time lifting the tire from the wheel, grabbing the tube and pulling it out.














Replace or patch tube.

Generally I will slightly inflate the tube, not quite full so it's tight, but not un-inflated completely like a new tube will be. You won't have the valve core in at this time anyways so it won't keep and pressure. This will help with getting the tube in without folds or twists.

Get out the tube snake, insert it from the inside side of the tire, again lifting the tire, reaching in with a couple fingers and grab the other end of the snake. Pull it out so it's looped through the wheel like this.









Lay the tube out on the tire, rolling the valve stem towards the center of the wheel so you can connect the snake to the stem. Roll the snake between you thumb and finger to screw it in.










Pull up tire and stuff the tube inside, keeping the stem near the hole in the wheel. Pull on snake to bring the stem closer to the hole, finish installing tube in tire. Now finish getting the valve stem into the wheel, pull hard on the snake, if it doesn't pop in, lift up tire and help it move while pulling on the snake.









After it's all seated, remove the snake and install the retaining nut for the valve stem, finger tight is good. Then install Valve core and slightly inflate the tube. It shouldn't be fully tight but have some tension on it when you reach in and feel it. This is to avoid giving your self a pinch flat while using the levers to mount the tire in the wheel, I believe than having a little pressure helps avoid this annoying thing that can happen if the tube gets caught in between the lever and the wheel.



Line the tire up with the valve stem on the wheel like you noted earlier to keep the tire balance correct. You did that right?
Now, spray the tire again with the soapy water and get your card and levers all set, starting with two this time and at about 6 and 9 o'clock. This is just to get you started, it's easier to start this way to get the tire down in the center of the rim.






After the first pull of the levers there won't be much tension on the tire, I will use one knee to hold one side, remove that lever and move it up going clockwise.
Keep moving your way around with the levers, they should be facing with the curved lip facing down this time, to help grab onto the wheel and pull the tire over it.




Since these particular OEM tires are very soft I was ble to use my knees to hold it down while moving levers and keep it in the center of the wheel. This is another part where you have to do what works for you, you could move in small amounts and use the levers like you did taking it off, or use your whole body to help it along.











Finish it off, being careful not to put any more of the lever inside the tire as needed for the lip to grab the wheel, you wouldn't want to give yourself a pinch flat and have to do it all over again a half hour down the road. That sucks.







Once done, inflate the tire with your air compressor, don't bother with those C02 things, by the time you carry enough of them to inflate you tire a couple times if things don't go right, you've already taken enough space and spent enough money you might as well have something that doesn't run out.
Lost Rider,

Thanks for this tutorial. The last bike with tubes I changed a tire on was a 1971 Honda CB350K3 back in 1988, and those tires just popped off once the air was out of them. These tubeless tires are a whole different ball gamel. I was able to get the back completely apart, though I was doing it in my shop. I'd hate to try to do this alongside the road somewhere, possibly at night.

But again, Thanks for the tutorial, wouldn't have been as successful without your step-by-step.

Best,
-Tim
 

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I know it’s been said a thousand times, .....now a thousand and one. Thank You Sir !
I’m putting my FlatKit together tomorrow ... your efforts are well appreciated.
 
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