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Discussion Starter #1
Today I had my first ever ride on a Scrambler and everything I read is true about the suspension, was like riding a hard tail, absolutely horrific, manageable but horrific at the same time.

So how does one cure it other than replacing ?
 

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2014 BMW R NineT (Classic)
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If you don't like the suspension your options are limited other than replacing the shock. You could get a suspension shop to replace the rear spring with something a little softer, but really if you are as unhappy as you sound there is no option other than to replace the shock... There is also the possibility that the tyre pressures were set wrong or the damping wasn't set up, but (if my classic is anything to go by) the improvements aren't great, but they are noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cheers BD.

I've been scouring the for sales everywhere for weeks now for the right bike to appear, I'm so glad I didn't buy one without riding one first as I didn't think it would be so harsh. TBH it's probably something I could live with but does possibly explain why there are quite a lot of low mileage ones for sale.
 

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Hi BaldyDave,
I know there are countless posts on suspensions but have not managed to find the following answers to my shock question.

So, if I replace the scrambler’s shock with the classic’s shock:
  • Will the ride be better?
  • Will the bike height remain the same?
Thanks - Silaxe
 

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If the scrambler is same suspension as my Urban then the rear spring is too soft which means blowing through the travel onto bump stop and combined with way too much high speed compression damping it makes the rear harsh.
Worth trying a stiffer spring on rear, softer spring on front and less oil in forks to soften front end.
the front end is too stiff and rear too soft on my urban as standard, creating a horrible mismatch.
This doesn't cost a lot of money to sort and well worth experimenting if your OK with basic spannering.
I still eventually bought a Nitron rear shock but I found springs and oil changes worth doing. I also eventually fitted damper rod 'emulators' in the forks to improve further but this takes a lot more messing about.

You can confirm if you need spring changes for your weight by measuring 'rider on sag' with no preload, plenty of youtube articles showing how.
 

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No the ride won
Hi BaldyDave,
I know there are countless posts on suspensions but have not managed to find the following answers to my shock question.

So, if I replace the scrambler’s shock with the classic’s shock:
  • Will the ride be better?
  • Will the bike height remain the same?
Thanks - Silaxe
No the ride won't be any better
The scrambler is taller than a classic std so the rear height would likely be lower
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You can confirm if you need spring changes for your weight by measuring 'rider on sag' with no preload, plenty of youtube articles showing how.
I've been around bikes a long time now and never to this day can I get my head round rider sag etc, I have read dozens upon dozens of articles, watched dozens of YT vids yet I still can't get to grasps with it.
 

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I've been around bikes a long time now and never to this day can I get my head round rider sag etc, I have read dozens upon dozens of articles, watched dozens of YT vids yet I still can't get to grasps with it.
it's pretty easy,
with the bike on level ground and upright take a measurement to somewhere on the subframe that is constant. eg the indicator
Then lift the rear until it tops out and measure it again while held up, that gives you your free sag, looking for about 10-15mm max.
then sit on the bike in your gear, upright feet on the pegs, may need someone to hold the bike upright for you at the bars. Measure it again, the difference between your starting point and with you on it is loaded or "rider" sag, looking for no more than 30 to 35mm
If you have less sag than that wind preload off and measure again, if you have more sag than that wind preload on and measure again, if you run out of preload adjustment before you get rider sag in the range then your spring is incorrect.

My std spring with no preload at all still had too little rider sag, maybe 10mm, that's it so the spring was way too hard for my weight, trouble is, changing the spring might get the sag you need and improve the comfort a little but it won't improve the damping and rebound qualities, in fact, it will likely make them worse because the spring is now moving in a longer stroke and the poor quality of the std unit can't cope, especially on rebound.
 
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