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2015 R Nine T Classic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2016 R9T Classic and recently, when turning the key on, bike does not have juice to gauges or starter. If I keep turning it on and off several times, it will come on. Once it turns on, it comes on the next turn and future turns, until I let it sit for days. No problem starting/running once gauges go on. I cleaned the battery terminals and keep it on a trickle charger. I also tried wiggling wires near ignition lock. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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@Hawaiian R NineT

Yes it is possible that the ignition switch could be the issue ( if I remember right this issue did affect early bikes there was certainly chatter on the forum back in the early days, and - if my memory can be trusted - they were replaced under warranty). Ignition switch issues has not really been an feature on the forum for many years now but I wouldn't rule it out. To be clear, are you saying that when the issue occurs, the instruments are dead (no lights in the cluster and the gauges don't do their power-up cycle) plus the bike won't crank over?

Starting problems on this forum normally come down to the battery being the culprit, but your issue doesn't totally fit into this scenario. Is it the original battery that came with the bike? If you have a multimeter, a battery voltage test might give you more of a grasp as to if the battery is no it's way out. However I think a battery that can still start the bike (eventually) would at least give you instrument function but the 9T can do strange things with failing batteries.
 

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If it is the original battery then I have to relate DAH! If the battery is a replacement and is more than two (2) years old and or the lower (OEM standard) CCA then it is more than likely the battery. I have four Are Nine Tee models and three so far have done some pretty odd things as well as left me stranded due to a done in battery. You might get a good battery voltage reading directly from the battery at rest no load but the real test is what the battery voltage is when you push that starter button with a cold motor. Start with the KISS method which translates into Keep It Simple Stupid and it should all work out.
 

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2015 R Nine T Classic
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22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Hawaiian R NineT

Yes it is possible that the ignition switch could be the issue ( if I remember right this issue did affect early bikes there was certainly chatter on the forum back in the early days, and - if my memory can be trusted - they were replaced under warranty). Ignition switch issues has not really been an feature on the forum for many years now but I wouldn't rule it out. To be clear, are you saying that when the issue occurs, the instruments are dead (no lights in the cluster and the gauges don't do their power-up cycle) plus the bike won't crank over?

Starting problems on this forum normally come down to the battery being the culprit, but your issue doesn't totally fit into this scenario. Is it the original battery that came with the bike? If you have a multimeter, a battery voltage test might give you more of a grasp as to if the battery is no it's way out. However I doubt a battery that can still start the bike (eventually) would not at least give you instrument function but the 9T can do strange things with failing batteries.

Yes, gauges don't light up, when having issue. Battery 1 year old and seem good as the voltage is 12.8V+. I'll look into ignition switch. Thanks for rely.
 

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268 Posts
I know batteries can be the cause of some problems, but on here it seems to the standard "Go To" for any electrical fault.

From the initial post I didn't think the battery was the issue, how can a bad battery suddenly start to work? It would also have be in pretty awful condition not to even power the clocks.

Sounds to me like either the ignition switch, or associated wiring. As @BaldyDave stated, there were issues with pre 17 bikes I believe, where the loom rubbed or was tight around the headstock, if memory serves me right.

I'd have a good look around the headstock area and inspect the loom for rubbing/tightness/excessive loom movement. Even if there is no obvious damage if the loom is tight or has excessive movement when the steering is turned lock to lock, it could result in strained wires or breakage. When wire breaks inside the insulation, it usually will continue to function for a while but ocassionally go open circuit. The bad news is it will stop working altogether in the long term.

If that doesn't reveal anything then I'd start to look specifically at the switch.

I wonder if anybody has any more specific data on the loom issue as BMW did rectify on later bikes.
 

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Start with the KISS method which translates into..............
.............You wanted the best, you got the best, the hottest band in the world.........KISS!

Soz @JeffsBMW I couldn't resist that!!! :whistle:

The OP says that wiggling the switch a few times brings the bike/clocks to life......but if the bike is left unused for a few days the problem returns.

This reminds me of a similar scenario I once had with a car, where the contacts in the ignition switch would oxidise/fur up if unused for a few days. Repeated rapid turning/rotating of the switch would then clean the contacts enough for it to crank, but if it was left unused again for a length of time the problem would return. A squirt of contact cleaner directly deep into the switch from a spray can with a straw applicator, followed by copious rotations, and then WD40 again squirted deep into the switch to protect from future corrosion cured the problem.

Gorra be worth a try..........it is a Keep It Simple Stupid method, as Jeff suggests!!!

Failing that, the battery and wiring looms issues already suggested are well know problems with this bike, so those are also areas to investigate.
 

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Hi Guys, it seems I have this exact issue on my 2014. I have to turn the key a few times, click the kill-switch a few times and once the dash is on, it starts up. Battery is good.

Just so i am not confusing myself, this is the Kill-switch issue, not the key barrel.

Or is it both?

Should the contact cleaner/WD-40 be applied to both?

Is there a more permanent solution? Should i just replace the kill-switch. Replacing the key barrel would be a much bigger task/cost with the key replacement etc etc right?
 

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2019 Scrambler Option 719, 2013 K1600GTL,
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Your kill switch shouldn't have anything to do with this. The ignition switch controls power to the bike and gauges. Activating the kill switch doesn't kill power, just the engine. Cleaning the ignition switch periodically should keep it working just fine. I'd use a cleaner over WD40 because it may attract dirt over time but it isn't strictly necessary. Replacing the ignition switch may be a permanent solution but maintaining yours a couple times year will probably work as well. My other BMW is a 2013 and I had problems with switches on that one. Replacement costs are offensive to me and I refuse to give them cash when the replacements may be of the same mfr and quality. I first had trouble a few years ago and am still using original parts. I include them in the service schedule and they operate like new.

On a side note, spraying the kill switch probably won't do anything at all. I believe the switch itself is enclosed in a weatherproof cover and is merely activated by the red plastic piece. WD40 probably won't even lube the spring loaded bits. That switch has to be disassembled to lube properly.
 

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2015 R Nine T Classic
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi Guys, it seems I have this exact issue on my 2014. I have to turn the key a few times, click the kill-switch a few times and once the dash is on, it starts up. Battery is good.

Just so i am not confusing myself, this is the Kill-switch issue, not the key barrel.

Or is it both?

Should the contact cleaner/WD-40 be applied to both?

Is there a more permanent solution? Should i just replace the kill-switch. Replacing the key barrel would be a much bigger task/cost with the key replacement etc etc right?
Your kill switch shouldn't have anything to do with this. The ignition switch controls power to the bike and gauges. Activating the kill switch doesn't kill power, just the engine. Cleaning the ignition switch periodically should keep it working just fine. I'd use a cleaner over WD40 because it may attract dirt over time but it isn't strictly necessary. Replacing the ignition switch may be a permanent solution but maintaining yours a couple times year will probably work as well. My other BMW is a 2013 and I had problems with switches on that one. Replacement costs are offensive to me and I refuse to give them cash when the replacements may be of the same mfr and quality. I first had trouble a few years ago and am still using original parts. I include them in the service schedule and they operate like new.

On a side note, spraying the kill switch probably won't do anything at all. I believe the switch itself is enclosed in a weatherproof cover and is merely activated by the red plastic piece. WD40 probably won't even lube the spring loaded bits. That switch has to be disassembled to lube properly.
My problem was with he ignition switch. I realized I had washed the bike weeks before for the first time (usually just wipe it) and probably got water in the ignition switch and weeks later it was an intermittent starting problem. Since the WD40 soak, I've had no problems since.
 
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