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BMW R nineT Pure
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2,067 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First, a little background: I often use a rechargeable work light while working on my motorcycle in the garage. But this winter I could not find the charger for that work light. Lost somewhere in the garage I guess. I had to order another charger, but this time before putting it in my tool chest I put it in a small baggie and stuck a Post-It note in the bag, labeling what it was so as not to lose it or wonder which of the chargers laying about is the right one for that light bar.

I recently carried this idea over into the storage of some small spare parts and take-offs from my motorcycle. I have a small box dedicated to spares, so they're all in one place. I also started putting my installation instruction pages in a 3-ring binder instead of stacking them on a shelf. I'm sure I'm far from the first to do these things, but I thought I'd pass along these good practices. (Please see the photo below for a couple samples of the spares.)

I also want to pass along an issue I found with my bike's ignition key. While riding one day last fall, I stopped to take in some scenery after the low-fuel warning light and mileage counter had popped up. When I went to restart the bike, electrics came on, but the engine did not turn over. I wondered at the time (and later posted on the forum) whether the bike's computer kept the bike from starting due to it thinking there wasn't enough fuel in the tank to safely start and run it. A couple members said no, that wouldn't happen. I had to remove and reinsert the key 2-3 times before the bike fired up. I was puzzled, but didn't worry too much about it.

The same thing happened last week, only this time there was plenty of fuel in the tank. I took the key out, reinserted it, and tried again but the engine still wouldn't crank. This time, however, I looked at the gauge's LCD display. It showed a diagram of a key and a question mark. I turned the ignition off, removed the key, looked at it, and found there was some grime in the grooves. I wondered, "Could that be the cause?" I wiped the grime from the grooves, tried again, and the bike started up perfectly. Looking at my owner's manual just now, I found the symbol means "Electronic immobilizer is active." A dirty key is not among the two possible causes listed there, but that was clearly the problem. When I had removed the key and reinserted it a couple times that day last fall, it must have dislodged the grime just enough to allow disable the immobilizer. I'm sure other BMW owners have experienced this issue, but I've posted it here just in case anyone else runs into this and can't figure out the cause.

By the way, one of the solutions in the owner's manual is to "Have the defective key replaced, preferably by an authorized BMW Motorrad retailer." Check your key's grooves before you pay for a new key (or two) at a dealer shop, which I'm sure is not cheap. Hopefully by sharing this here I'll save someone the time and expense of key replacement.

So the lessons for today are to label your spares and take-offs, and to keep your BMW keys clean! :)
142431
 

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Premium Member
BMW R nineT Pure
Joined
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2,067 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is an immobilizer an optional extra?
I just checked my sale paperwork from when I bought the bike last fall to see if it was listed as an option, but I don't have a copy of the 'window sticker' for my bike, so I can't tell. I think the immobilizer is standard equipment, but please don't quote me on that.
 

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7 Posts
First, a little background: I often use a rechargeable work light while working on my motorcycle in the garage. But this winter I could not find the charger for that work light. Lost somewhere in the garage I guess. I had to order another charger, but this time before putting it in my tool chest I put it in a small baggie and stuck a Post-It note in the bag, labeling what it was so as not to lose it or wonder which of the chargers laying about is the right one for that light bar.

I recently carried this idea over into the storage of some small spare parts and take-offs from my motorcycle. I have a small box dedicated to spares, so they're all in one place. I also started putting my installation instruction pages in a 3-ring binder instead of stacking them on a shelf. I'm sure I'm far from the first to do these things, but I thought I'd pass along these good practices. (Please see the photo below for a couple samples of the spares.)

I also want to pass along an issue I found with my bike's ignition key. While riding one day last fall, I stopped to take in some scenery after the low-fuel warning light and mileage counter had popped up. When I went to restart the bike, electrics came on, but the engine did not turn over. I wondered at the time (and later posted on the forum) whether the bike's computer kept the bike from starting due to it thinking there wasn't enough fuel in the tank to safely start and run it. A couple members said no, that wouldn't happen. I had to remove and reinsert the key 2-3 times before the bike fired up. I was puzzled, but didn't worry too much about it.

The same thing happened last week, only this time there was plenty of fuel in the tank. I took the key out, reinserted it, and tried again but the engine still wouldn't crank. This time, however, I looked at the gauge's LCD display. It showed a diagram of a key and a question mark. I turned the ignition off, removed the key, looked at it, and found there was some grime in the grooves. I wondered, "Could that be the cause?" I wiped the grime from the grooves, tried again, and the bike started up perfectly. Looking at my owner's manual just now, I found the symbol means "Electronic immobilizer is active." A dirty key is not among the two possible causes listed there, but that was clearly the problem. When I had removed the key and reinserted it a couple times that day last fall, it must have dislodged the grime just enough to allow disable the immobilizer. I'm sure other BMW owners have experienced this issue, but I've posted it here just in case anyone else runs into this and can't figure out the cause.

By the way, one of the solutions in the owner's manual is to "Have the defective key replaced, preferably by an authorized BMW Motorrad retailer." Check your key's grooves before you pay for a new key (or two) at a dealer shop, which I'm sure is not cheap. Hopefully by sharing this here I'll save someone the time and expense of key replacement.

So the lessons for today are to label your spares and take-offs, and to keep your BMW keys clean! :)
View attachment 142431
TimC
i have two 2014 RnineTs; one for my son and one for moi

on my rninet the start procedure has been dysfunctional for about eighteen months; sporadically when i insert key and turn it on, there is no lcd display nor energy when starter button is pressed; but by inserting and removing the key a half dozen times, i was able power to the lcd display and to get a start

i was almost thinking i needed new key or new key barrel switch; but thanks to you, i have just cleaned lotsa crud of the key shaft with nail polish remover and cotton buds; now i have just tested you “cleanse the key” theory, and low and behold, i worked ten times in a row

thank you TimC and RnineTowners.com
 
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