BMW NineT Forum banner

101 - 119 of 119 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
From BMW themselves on the octane topic:


Dear Michael,

Thank you for your reply.

The fuel recommendation for the changed for the BMW R NineT Racer in the United States in 2017, even though there was no change to the engine or motorcycle. Regrettably, there was no explanation of the change. You can use both fuel types, 87 AKI and 93 AKI, but with regular unleaded fuel you'll have a slight reduction in performance and potentially higher consumption.

For your convenience, the BMW Motorrad Customer Relations and Services Department is available Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. ET. You can reach us at 1-800-831-1117.

I hope you find this information helpful.

Regards,

Heather Pargeon
BMW Motorrad USA
Representative
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
In Canada, one reason to use "premium" at the pump of certain Shell stations, is the absence of ethanol in the blend.
Canucks on this forum, feel free to chime in.

"Be free from the gravity of Expectation"
 

·
Registered
2018 R9T scrambler
Joined
·
34 Posts
Nice! somebody else emailed BMW (and got same response).As our super moderator states, really nothing to get heated about,and the world has much bigger problems than what gas we put in our beloved bikes. Healthy informative discussion here,albeit perhaps trivial to many.For me, the way I'm wired, just liked to know what's best and hopefully why .There are opinions and then there are facts. If it's all the same,Ok. If better performance with better gas ,that's what i'm doing. And like Bliltz said, why get a premium machine and go cheap on the gas ? I think I'm gonna go try to figure out what the best suspension upgrade is now.... ;) Stay safe
 

·
Premium Member
2018 BMW Racer
Joined
·
2 Posts
131675
Finally got my C9 in, going to replace the TFC gas since I don’t ride it currently and then put the rest in the racer. At 15 bucks a gallon, it is a little over the top, but I don’t put more then a couple of hundred miles a year on the racer, and the bike might set for several months. VP C9 is good for five years in the can, and two years in the tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
I've tried them all and feel that the higher octane fuel makes my bike run better (it could be some sort of placebo effect, but the perception is there).
I would very much doubt it's a placebo effect........and here's a lil' story which may explain why.........

Waaaaaay back when, mid to late 90's IIRC.......I was running a Vauxhall Cavalier 4x4 turbo (which was a pretty hot poop car back then). One day I pull into my normal fuel station and being a creature of habit I'm annoyed to find my usual pump is being used, so I find another clear one and fill it up. Now for the next few days I can't understand why the car is absolutely flying.....it was quick before but it's now like it's on steroids. Days later I eventually look back at my fuel receipt, and ONLY THEN notice I had inadvertently used V-Power. I had felt the performance increase it gave, but was not aware at that time I'd used a 'superfuel'.....so that noticeable extra poke was deffo not a placebo effect. At next fill I went back to normal unleaded, and the 'extra' performance was gone. I used V-Power again at the subsequent fill and that extra zip was back.

I then decided to do an experiment, and filled the missus Renault Scenic up with V-power hoping for the same effect. Result....no noticeable difference. I put this down the engine not being performance orientated enough to benefit from what advantages the V-Power fuel offered.

Fast forward a few years and I then have another turbo charged car, a Subaru Impreza. That is run exclusively on V-Power......until one day I'm low on fuel and nowhere near a Shell station, so I'm forced to use a splash and dash of the best they had......no prizes for guessing the performance dropped, but returned again as soon as I could next refill with V-Power.


So.........I have experienced first hand, on a number of occasions, that high octane fuels DO have a benefit..........but ONLY if the engine it is feeding can utilise it. Feeding a donkey racehorse grub isn't going to turn it into a racehorse!! Likewise, feeding a racehorse on donkey fodder isn't going to do it any favours for it's performance or stamina.

That is why I ONLY ever use V-Power fuel in my Rnine......not only does the handbook recommend high octane for BEST performance, but also it's use was recommended when I had the ECU remapped by Hilltop.


There's not getting away from it that these BMW bikes we have chosen to spend our money on are expensive...........No one would dream of buying an expensive wine to then water it down..........so why buy an expensive bike and then water it down with a cheapo fuel option??

To do so just doesn't make sense to me.....but each to their own I guess!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
You won't. There is no benefit to running premium in a regular octane engine. My '19 says premium. Don't know what changed. My Africa Twin said regular and it never saw a drop of hi-test.
I recall reading that our engine, in order to meet emissions, using a much leaner fuel mixture, BMW utilizes two spark plugs to ensure complete combustion. This also allows for the use of a lower octane fuel, regular gas.
 

·
Registered
2020 BMW R nineT Scrambler
Joined
·
5 Posts
Just bought my first BMW two days ago. 2020 Scrambler. Manual says to use 93 or 91 AKI. Alternative is 89 AKI. Is AKI the same as octane? I live in the U.S. and my local gas station only has 87 octane. I put in 1 gallon to get me to the next town...the best they have is 91 octane. What octane should I use? Finding 93 octane jsut means I have to go a little further when I need gas. Thinking ahead though, I'm sure there will be times when I'm in rural areas on longer rides and gas stations will only offer 87... I'm looking forward to owning this bike for many years to come and I don't want to mess anything up.
 

·
Registered
2020 BMW R nineT Scrambler
Joined
·
5 Posts
Just bought my first BMW two days ago. 2020 Scrambler. Manual says to use 93 or 91 AKI. Alternative says 89 AKI. Is AKI the same as octane here in the states? I live in the U.S. and my local gas station only has 87 octane. I put in 1 gallon to get me to the next town...the best they have is 91 octane. What octane should I use? Finding 93 octane just means I have to go a little further when I need gas. Thinking ahead though, I'm sure there will be times when I'm in rural areas on longer rides and gas stations will only offer 87... I'm looking forward to owning this bike for many years to come and I don't want to mess anything up.
I just found this thread and read through it. Thanks for all the info! I’ll always be putting the higher octane in, just curious about those times I find myself in towns that only offer 87.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
265 Posts
I've been using 87 regular for over 13000 miles on my 18 urban with absolutely no issues.Havent experienced and engine knocking or loss of power. Have bounced back to premium once or twice during that time period but haven't felt and difference what so ever so to me it's silly to pay the premium price.
 

·
Registered
2020 BMW R nineT Scrambler
Joined
·
5 Posts
I've been using 87 regular for over 13000 miles on my 18 urban with absolutely no issues.Havent experienced and engine knocking or loss of power. Have bounced back to premium once or twice during that time period but haven't felt and difference what so ever so to me it's silly to pay the premium price.
Awesome! Thanks for the reassurance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Firstly I am new to the boxer engine.. but I have to say I love it!

With reference to fuel grade, a colleague who shall remain nameless worked for an independent fuel/oil testing company, they apparently test most car and bike manufactures engines and gearboxes with many different oil / petrol grades and specs, they then report their findings to the respective manufacturer.
He simply states, the performance isn't the issue so much as the engine condition when stripped after running on a dyno for 120,000 miles, the higher RON fuel always delivers 'an engine in near perfect condition and internally clean'.(y)(y)(y)
I take what he states as true he always fills' up with the highest RON non supermarket fuel he can find... Don't mention diesels to him either, he will only use one brand.. Shell advanced the rest he describes as 'cooking oil'.

As the saying goes it would appear you get what you pay for.

Just saying .

Happy BOXER blipping!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
265 Posts
OK, to each their own. Your pocket book, your choice. Main thing is to ride to that targeted. 120000 miles on each and every bike no matter what fuel😀.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
375 Posts
Firstly I am new to the boxer engine.. but I have to say I love it!

With reference to fuel grade, a colleague who shall remain nameless worked for an independent fuel/oil testing company, they apparently test most car and bike manufactures engines and gearboxes with many different oil / petrol grades and specs, they then report their findings to the respective manufacturer.
He simply states, the performance isn't the issue so much as the engine condition when stripped after running on a dyno for 120,000 miles, the higher RON fuel always delivers 'an engine in near perfect condition and internally clean'.(y)(y)(y)
I take what he states as true he always fills' up with the highest RON non supermarket fuel he can find... Don't mention diesels to him either, he will only use one brand.. Shell advanced the rest he describes as 'cooking oil'.

As the saying goes it would appear you get what you pay for.

Just saying .

Happy BOXER blipping!
Surely, that would be more down to the oil used and the service regimen rather than petrol/gas used?
Ken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Oil turns black because of heat, however petrol engines just like diesel engines will produce soot, the better grade of fuel the less soot produced and hence cleaner internals.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
375 Posts
Quote “Engine in near perfect condition and internally clean”.
Two different things for sure.
Ken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Not really, an engine contaminated with soot will always turn its oil darker than one that is internally clean.
A fuel which has a higher soot content apparently has a higher wear Coefficient, my colleague conducted a test on two new identical German petrol car engines they ran two different grades of petrol up to 120,000 miles following the manufactures service recommends and used identical oil as also recommended by the manufacturer. On completion the engines were stripped back to component level and guess which one was still within the original manufactures 'new engine tolerance'.

Food for thought me thinks, the above was not a one off they have done similar on many types / makes of combustion engine it would appear with the result always working in the favour of higher octane / premium fuels, I could go on all night with what my colleague tells me, his comments on using synthetic 2 stoke in modern diesels is also very interesting.
Anyway's you pay' s your money and you take your chance.

👍👍👍
 
101 - 119 of 119 Posts
Top