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Hi all,

Today marks the 14th day of ownership of my 2019 Scrambler and have clocked 500km on it, been brilliant!!
Finding out a lot as I am getting to know the bike with the usual things like "Clunking" of the clutch in 1st and 2nd primarily, rear suspension settings, buying a paddock stand etc. All along with the usual paranoia of "Did it do this when I picked it up from the dealer? Have I created this noise? Bugger, is the clutch about to break..etc :) )

Last week I went on a 100km tour with some mates. One of them own a 2016 R Nine T. He noted slightly different gear ratios but otherwise all good. One thing we did find was this reservoir on the left side near the rear suspension on my Scrambler which he doesn't have? I cannot find it in the manuals. Anyone enlighten me please what it is for?

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Ah thanks Gaum69. Mine is a 2019 European model but seems they got it too.
 

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Pleasure.
I think they all had the canister.
 

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Hi guys - I just got additional fog lights which I plan to install on the crash bar.....
My question is towards the connectivity: Do I have to run the wiring harness to the battery (under the tank!) or can I utilize any of the plugs?
Thanks guys...
 

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My question is towards the connectivity: Do I have to run the wiring harness to the battery (under the tank!) or can I utilize any of the plugs?
For additional lights it is always best to wire in a relay from the battery. This will give you some 'fuse' protection also.
Depending on the power draw, you could use the outlet socket on the left side of your bike with a suitable plug, but you would still have to wire in a switch so they are not on all the time.
This is probably best for daytime lights that do not draw much, best to hard wire the bigger fog lights.
Also when you say "run the wiring harness to the battery", there are positive mounting points under the seat at the rear of the tank. No need to go all the way to the battery.

Have a read of this thread when you are ready: Wiring Gadgets on the NineT
 

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Blipping killed the engine

Hi guys.

I just got my bike 2 days ago so allow me a few questions:

1. Has anyone experienced engine shut off when the throttle is blipped? As I got home from work I left the bike on idle while I opened the gate. When I got back on, I blipped the throttle and the engine died. No issues restarting but that's the first on ANY bike I've ridden.

2. I am used to blipping the throttle when down-shifting but I noticed that there is a "metallic tick" sound when I do that on the 9T. Is this normal or does this bike shy from blipping? Could this be the cause of question 1?

Thanks for any inputs.
Hi
I know it is a old post but I have the same problem. Any solutions? What can I say to the dealer?
Thank you!!
 

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I usually blip when shifting down with no major consequences. You maybe just need to be a little less violent in acting on the throttle, I had the same effect also on my previous R1200R and it's considered to be (almost) normal with these boxer engines even if reading around, it may be a slightly sub-optimal regulation of the throttle bodies.
 

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Hi
I know it is a old post but I have the same problem. Any solutions? What can I say to the dealer?
Thank you!!
I “blip” all the time ... and yes I’ve killed or stalled the bike a dozen times in the beginning. I learned that a fuel injected engine throttles up differently than an aspirated engine. If you give it just a tiny twist of the wrist first, just enough to hear the change in RPM’s then blip it I think you’ll find it works every time, especially when actually starting out from a standstill stop. You’ll be much less likely to stall. Also if the engine is very new (less than 5K) it’s seems more likely to hesitate and possibly stall.
Let the engine break in throughly and it wont be quite as susceptible to stalls. I’m a hard core “Blipper”, back when I began to ride there were no syncro’s on motorcycle transmitions, or cars for that matter and in order to down shift with out grinding gears you had to match engine RPM with ground speed in order to down shift. It’s second nature for me after learning how to down shift in order to protect the brakes in competition, back then disk brakes weren’t on bikes yet and if you overheated the drum brakes they just went away all together. Down shifting was a big big part of braking on a circuit track. Remember your BMW was once an airplane plant and there wasn’t much need to Blip with a propeller and no transmission. Be gentle with your girl and just give her a small hint by a tiny twist of the throttle then give her a quick snap and she’ll be there for you anxious to deliver the ride of a life time. Be safe, be well and be happy, life is short, don’t waste a moment and get UpOn2 as often as you can. .....Blitz ✌😎
 
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Thank you for you replies. My bike doesn’t stalled. It only makes the metallic clunk when blipping. It really annoyes me specially when downshifting but it has never stalled.
 

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It you’re talking about a clunk akin to a socket dropping into a metal toolbox, it comes down to how you shift on these things. Decades ago, the predecessors to these gear boxes were a much clunkier experience. Or they could be.

First: preload the shifter a little before pulling in the shift lever. By this, I mean put a little pressure on the lever.

Second: fan the clutch while shifting. Don’t pull the clutch all the way in and then try to shift. The latter works, but the transmission shifts better if the shift happens as you give the lever a squeeze. The preloading greatly helps this happen easily.

Third: if down shifting, the above works well if you also barely adjust the throttle. Staying a little on the gas will cause the engine speed to increase and match revs causing the shift to happen more smoothly.

It can seem a little weird, if someone is used to shifting a bike with a wet clutch, but it gets better with practice. After a while, it’s all very quick and easy. Preloading can be the most critical part.

I used to drop a lot sockets when I bought a K bike many years ago. I rarely if ever do so these days.
 

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thank you. It happens in neutral when blipping or filtering through traffic when you are blipping the throttle. I guess that shifting matters bur that metallic sound happens in neutral
 

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My Scrambler engine died a few times during a similar scenario when driving away after opening the garage door but the dealer said they traced it down to an issue with the sensor on the side stand (which prevents you putting the engine in first gear with it extended)....I was surprised with their answer as I didn't expect that to be a possibility but for be fair it has never happened since.
 

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Hi there, new R nineT Pure owner here, with possibly the silliest of questions ever, but be nice!

I have a Wunderlich tail tidy I want to fit on but for the life of me, I can't see how to disconnect the wiring. I've looked at dozens of videos, scoured the Haynes Manual and enlarged the instructions from Wunderlich. It appears they just pull apart with brute force. I'm assuming that I need to cut through the cable ties (do I need to re-tie them?), but the illustrations show little sprung tabs on what seem to be the male end. Will yanking the connectors apart damage the tabs and wiring or is there a technique that isn't shown?

I'm attaching a photo of the tail end as it is now.

Thanks in anticipation!
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5918DC79-C264-49DF-A20B-6DF5F94435E6.jpeg
 

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Newer owner here. Bought my new 2020 Pure in late August and it has 1,600 miles on the clock already. :)

I have three questions. Thanks in advance for any help!

1. Sometimes when I upshift from 5th to 6th, the gear change is a little crunchy. And by that I mean I can feel a little resistance which I don't feel in any of the other gear changes. I don't know if I'd call it a grinding feeling, but it's similar. It's like there's a little hitch to the shifting action. It doesn't happen all the time, but often enough I'm concerned. I'm guessing it will smooth out as I put more miles on the bike, but can anyone say whether this is normal for a new R9T?
2. Also related to 5th to 6th upshifts, once in a while if I don't toe the shifter up quite hard enough into 6th gear, the gearbox "falls" back into 5th gear, usually after just 2-3 seconds in the higher gear. I try not to be lazy in shifting, but this is a new one to me. I've never had a bike which failed to hold a gear like that. Is this the result of an old gearbox design and weak shifting action on my part, or have other owners experienced this?
3. I've been riding my Pure 2-3 times a week for my short commute (5 miles from home). After work, and after starting the bike, letting it warm up for a minute, and backing out of my parking spot, I see something has dripped from the bike onto the concrete. Not much, just one or two small spots, each about the size of a large coin. I'm thinking it might be condensation from the exhaust system, and hopefully not oil. Usually it appears to have come from about the front third to the middle of the bike. I don't see any residue on the underside of the bike which would indicate an oil leak. I haven't paused, parked the bike, and dipped a finger in the dripped area, but I'll try to do this next time. Anyway, does anyone have any ideas on this?
 

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1. Sometimes when I upshift from 5th to 6th, the gear change is a little crunchy. And by that I mean I can feel a little resistance which I don't feel in any of the other gear changes. I don't know if I'd call it a grinding feeling, but it's similar. It's like there's a little hitch to the shifting action. It doesn't happen all the time, but often enough I'm concerned. I'm guessing it will smooth out as I put more miles on the bike, but can anyone say whether this is normal for a new R9T?
2. Also related to 5th to 6th upshifts, once in a while if I don't toe the shifter up quite hard enough into 6th gear, the gearbox "falls" back into 5th gear, usually after just 2-3 seconds in the higher gear. I try not to be lazy in shifting, but this is a new one to me. I've never had a bike which failed to hold a gear like that. Is this the result of an old gearbox design and weak shifting action on my part, or have other owners experienced this?
Regarding both the above, you might need to adjust the gear lever to suit your feet - it might be something as simple as that.


3. I've been riding my Pure 2-3 times a week for my short commute (5 miles from home). After work, and after starting the bike, letting it warm up for a minute, and backing out of my parking spot, I see something has dripped from the bike onto the concrete. Not much, just one or two small spots, each about the size of a large coin. I'm thinking it might be condensation from the exhaust system, and hopefully not oil. Usually it appears to have come from about the front third to the middle of the bike. I don't see any residue on the underside of the bike which would indicate an oil leak. I haven't paused, parked the bike, and dipped a finger in the dripped area, but I'll try to do this next time. Anyway, does anyone have any ideas on this?
I get similar from my bike and it is just condensation coming out of a join between the silencer and the flapper eliminator pipe (or flapper if you still have it). Do the puddles evaporate or leave any significant stain? The discharge from my bike evaporates and leaves no significant stain behind. As you say, a possible test would be to dip your finger in the puddle, if it's not really greasy it will be water and you'll soon be able to tell if it is fuel by the smell (or not) if it doesn't smell and isn't really greasy it'll most likely be water.
 
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I have a Wunderlich tail tidy I want to fit on but for the life of me, I can't see how to disconnect the wiring. I've looked at dozens of videos, scoured the Haynes Manual and enlarged the instructions from Wunderlich. It appears they just pull apart with brute force. I'm assuming that I need to cut through the cable ties (do I need to re-tie them?), but the illustrations show little sprung tabs on what seem to be the male end. Will yanking the connectors apart damage the tabs and wiring or is there a technique that isn't shown?
Pretty well all of the connectors have a barbed spring tab that holds the two sides of the connectors together.
You need to press down on the spring tab, so that the barb at the other end raises up. In some connectors the barb is attached to the body so you need to raise the retainer.
While still holding down on the tab end so the barb is released, grip both ends of the connector body, NOT the wires!, and gently with a firm grip ease the two halves apart.
I find that a slight wriggling of the connectors side to side helps.
Do not use brute force, do not yank, it is not necessary and you may slip and pull on the wires instead.

If you are having difficulty you can prise the locking barb apart with a flat blade while pulling on the connector halves.

Yes it is best to remove the cable ties to give you more room to work with.
It is recommended to re-attach cable ties to keep the wiring snug so it cannot snag or get crimped anywhere.

Have a go on the connectors and shout out if you still need help. I can take a couple of pictures for you.

Cheers
 
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Regarding both the above, you might need to adjust the gear lever to suit your feet - it might be something as simple as that.


I get similar from my bike and it is just condensation coming out of a join between the silencer and the flapper eliminator pipe (or flapper if you still have it). Do the puddles evaporate or leave any significant stain? The discharge from my bike evaporates and leaves no significant stain behind. As you say, a possible test would be to dip your finger in the puddle, if it's not really greasy it will be water and you'll soon be able to tell if it is fuel by the smell (or not) if it doesn't smell and isn't really greasy it'll most likely be water.
Thanks for the help, Dave! Adjusting the shifter height is a great suggestion. It makes sense, too, as I've felt like I've sometimes felt like I'm not getting enough force into the upshifts with my left toes - like the lever is a bit too high. I think rotating the lever down 2-3 teeth will probably solve it. The bonus is doing this will kind of even out the shifter and the rear brake pedal, which is a little too low for my taste. (I wish that was adjustable, too.) This also gives me an excuse to buy a couple more tools. ;)

As for the drip, I'm pretty sure it is just condensation, like you said. Before leaving work this evening, I saw the drip as the bike was warming up, and it was about in the middle of the bike. I moved the bike backward a couple feet to check the spot, dipped a finger in it, and found the liquid was clear and had a very faint industrial smell. Also, I've been parking my bike in the same spot a few days a week for the last several weeks and there is no stain from those drops, so it's just evaporating. I'm satisfied it's just a few drops of water from the exhaust joint under the bike.

Thanks again!
 

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As to shifting, as I’ve written elsewhere, try preloading the shifter as you shift and don’t first pull the clutch in completely before shifting (I don’t know if you’re doing this). Further, it can be helpful to hold the shift lever up or down as you release the clutch lever. The throw is longer than on many other bikes and, more critically, as the bike has a dry clutch, it’s easier for gears to stop spinning and prevent a smooth shift. By holding the gear lever for a moment longer, you give the gears a chance to mesh fully as power is reapplies. This is especially helpful if one keeps missing 2nd gear from first.

or at least that’s my understanding.

We have a new puppy and my brain is a puddle of fluffy pee.
 
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