BMW NineT Forum banner

721 - 740 of 757 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
Looking at a new rear shock for my 2019 classic - my needs are SUPER simple, I want something that doesn't kick my butt on bumpy mountain roads here in the Santa Cruz mountains. This 15% off of Ohlins really has caught my eye but I'm fully unable to pick which is best for me so I'm hoping for some options, here are my details:

165 pounds in street clothes - 85kg = ~187lbs
90%+ time just solo riding - 100% solo
Not an agressive rider at all - generally last to roll in on group rides - same
Will likely add on a side bag - sometimes carry a small top-box @ ~6kg loaded
On rare occasions may have a passenger - never
Possible light touring once or twice a year - yes

So - thoughts on what to get? I am watching $ but would want to spend the right money ONCE and not be bummed that I 'should' have got this or that option.

Thanks all,
Hans

BM 440 suits me very well, and I match most of your norms. No mountains round here, but some local country roads can be pretty unsettling...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dudecati

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Looking at a new rear shock for my 2019 classic - my needs are SUPER simple, I want something that doesn't kick my butt on bumpy mountain roads here in the Santa Cruz mountains. This 15% off of Ohlins really has caught my eye but I'm fully unable to pick which is best for me so I'm hoping for some options, here are my details:

165 pounds in street clothes
90%+ time just solo riding
Not an agressive rider at all - generally last to roll in on group rides
Will likely add on a side bag
On rare occasions may have a passenger
Possible light touring once or twice a year

So - thoughts on what to get? I am watching $ but would want to spend the right money ONCE and not be bummed that I 'should' have got this or that option.

Thanks all,
Hans
If your riding alone most of the time just buy the manual preload adjustable shock and save $200
I only got the BM650 because the other 2 cheaper options were not available in the USA until June.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I just bought BM641 on WunderlichAmerica today, 15%off + free shipping is irresistible. It seems the major difference between BM640 and 641 is the component for adjusting the pre-load, so I think I am fine with the old-fashion way.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
BM 440 suits me very well, and I match most of your norms. No mountains round here, but some local country roads can be pretty unsettling...

Mt.Mee
Mt.Glorious
Mt.Nebo
???
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
Mountains in name only, IMHO.
Pfft, hardly!
3 of the best motorcycle roads in SE QLD.

What do you want to do, get your leather shorts and hiking boots on and go yodeling in the snow covered caps?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
Pfft, hardly!
3 of the best motorcycle roads in SE QLD.

What do you want to do, get your leather shorts and hiking boots on and go yodeling in the snow covered caps?
Still not mountains!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
Still not mountains!

Actually, they are

They usually have steep, sloping sides and sharp or rounded ridges, and a high point, called a peak or summit. Most geologists classify a mountain as a landform that rises at least 1,000 feet (300 meters) or more above its surrounding area. A mountain range is a series or chain of mountains that are close together.Mar 7, 2020

Mountains Information and Facts | National Geographic
www.nationalgeographic.com › science › earth › surface-of-the-eart
h


When you're wrong, you're ..... wrong.
 

·
Registered
2018 BMW Urban GS
Joined
·
15 Posts
Hi guys, I just saw the Wunderlich is offering a 15% discount on Ohlins products.
wunderlichamerica.com: Suspension

Do any of you run the "Ohlins premium shock" (BM640) with the Nix cartridge (FKS211) setup? I see what appears to be so many different variations of the Ohlins rear shock, not sure if this is a great upgrade over the stock shock.

Thanks in advance,
T
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
Ohlins is a premium brand and will definitely be an upgrade over the stock set up, with the NIX cartridges you choose the springs that match your weight, all good there.
For the rear, and it seems to be the the way with most Ohlins resellers you get what you're given, so if the spring rate doesn't suit your weight requirements then you have to pay extra for another spring, when i went shopping i discovered the spring was too heavy for my weight and it was going to cost me extra so i looked elsewhere.

These guys have an order page that asks for your weight doesn't seem to alter the price so it may benefit you to look there. They have three choices of spring.
The BM640 has a preload adjuster that requires a hex to turn whereby it adjusts the preload, for me that expense is pointless because you still need to carry or find a tool to adjust your preload, save your cash and buy the BM641 which uses locking collars and they supply a C spanner with the shock. It's another reason i went with the Nitron gear as they offer a hydraulic preload adjuster which i prefer for convenience.

Whatever you choose to do, if you make the change you definitely won't regret it, but take the time to shop and get the right gear that suits you closest, you will get a better ride and therefore better value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
No one has used the lesser expensive BM489, Blackline Street S46 shock? Curious how that is compared to stock? There is probably an equivalent for the newer years for comparison.

 

·
Registered
2018 BMW Urban GS
Joined
·
15 Posts
Ohlins is a premium brand and will definitely be an upgrade over the stock set up, with the NIX cartridges you choose the springs that match your weight, all good there.
For the rear, and it seems to be the the way with most Ohlins resellers you get what you're given, so if the spring rate doesn't suit your weight requirements then you have to pay extra for another spring, when i went shopping i discovered the spring was too heavy for my weight and it was going to cost me extra so i looked elsewhere.
Thanks for your response, Wunderlich's website also asks for your weight. Although the image of the shock on their site appears to be different than the one on Unit Garage's website, both share the same BM640 part number though, any clue if there's a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
This is not a plug for the OHLINS brand (or any other mentioned here), even though my R9T was equipped with OHLINS when I bought it two months ago. I'm pretty happy with what I got, and at worst a very little rear shock minor tweaking might be useful but by no means essential. The following (WARNING: long post) is what I had done to my previous bike, a Yamaha Tracer 900GT. My reason for posting this is to endorse 100% what others have said, both here and on other Forums, that spending money on a decent suspension upgrade is worth every penny you can afford. More personally, it highlights that for me I had neither to skills nor tools to attempt a DIY approach!

GT suspension upgrade - September 4th 2019

I'll have to be briefer than usual, for my supposedly-fixed PC is still sulking.

The work took Joe - owner of Ride Dynamics and suspension guru par excellence - some three and half hours of steady work, with no coffee or smoko breaks and no time-wasting Facebook chat.

As I had said before, his workshop is neat, clean, tidy, a place for everything and everything in its place, including the multitude of specialist tools required for this work. I couldn't imagine an amateur like me working with cheap hand-tools in a home garage being successful.

We again confirmed what I was looking for, we chatted briefly about my riding weight, whether pillion and/ or luggage is routinely carried, etc., and hi ho, hi ho!, it was off to work. After I swore on a stack of Bibles that I wouldn't get in his way or want to chat constantly, Joe allowed me to stand by - not too close! - to observe and take pix. It was a very interesting experience as calm, methodical work proceeded.

As the various parts emerged from the front fork legs Joe explained the function of the various bits - springs, pistons controlling oil-flow, and so on. To my novice eyes, the new K-tech components looked as if they'd just come from a high-end Swiss watch manufacturer, beautifully finished as they were.

The rear shock was a more straightforward swap, and although I was surprised at the lighter weight of the new Razor R shock with remote adjuster - the OE shock was much heavier. The new unit has adjustable length, so about 10 or 12mm (half-an-inch) was wound out, lowering the bike's rear by that much after I said that I like to be able to fully flat-foot at rest, which is barely achievable with the OE unit.

Sag - which I had always believed to be what happens to a woman's breasts and a man's belly as they age (the latter has happened to me!) - was precisely measured with a cunning device as small incremental changes were made until the desired settings were reached. Joe reckons that it's rare for an owner to need to return to him for further tweaking, but of course it's there as required. After he had a short test-ride to check everything, it was my turn to ride home, with my thoughts already given after that short and brief 33km ride.

Yesterday's 181km outing along very familiar roads was intended to give me more time to evaluate things on terrain of widely-varying surfaces and conditions. There is a distinct improvement in ride quality, best explained that the sharp reactions to road surface irregularities were ironed-out and a more compliant and composed and comfortable ride eventuated. A very good example of what this means was quickly apparent, as I found that I was no longer constantly being bumped-up off the seat and inched forward until my gonads were crushed against the rear of tank: I was 'planted' more firmly in the chosen spot. Of course, larger irregularities in the road-surface - and there are plenty where I went - were still felt, and I don't want to try to convince members that this was a magic-carpet ride, but certainly it was a pleasing outcome for me.

Memories of subjective impressions are such that it would be fruitless for me to try to compare the new GT ride with that of my later BMW Boxer twins, which are much heavier bikes and with high-end OE components, including BMW's incomparable Telever front-end, but I am happy.

I now intend to take that planned ~1000km circuit some time in the next week or two (but not at next week's end, for it will be Friday the thirteenth!), by which time a couple of shorter outings will have put a few hundred kilometres on the new suspension and allowed everything to have bedded-down.

A very good question at this point might be - "was it worth the $2100 spent on the K-tech upgrade?". I'm fortunate enough to have spare disposable income, so while not quite a no-brainer the matter of cost was not a great concern. But others may prefer to take a different lower-cost approach, maybe getting specialists like Ride Dynamics to make changes to the OE components by simply changing oils, shims, springs, whatever, and tinkering with the adjustability of the ex-factory suspension.

The jury is still out as far as I'm concerned on whether or not I'll want/ need to buy a new BAGSTER seat to replace the GT's OE seat, which although light-years ahead of Gen1 seats is still only 'just' for me. A new BAGSTER seat would cost $450 -$550 depending on specification, but from past experience I know that it would be the cherry on top of the icing on the cake. I'll make that call after the 1000km outing in a few weeks time, but in any case they are not yet available.

Finally, big thanks to captainscarlet who introduced me on this Forum to K-tech and the whole shebang. Pix follow...

P1050777.JPG a place for everything...

P1050779.JPG new Razor-R rear shock

P1050780.JPG work under way...

P1050781.JPG new (red) and old OE shocks.

P1050782.JPG spotless workshop..

P1050783.JPG draining oil from fork legs..

P1050784.JPG OE (right) and new oil-flow pistons

P1050785.JPG fork off...

P1050786.JPG new K-tech oil-flow control pistons

P1050787.JPG beautifully machined...

P1050788.JPG new rear shock installed

P1050790.JPG sag-o-meter

P1050791.JPG job done!

Edited 2 minutes ago by wordsmith
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
Thanks for your response, Wunderlich's website also asks for your weight. Although the image of the shock on their site appears to be different than the one on Unit Garage's website, both share the same BM640 part number though, any clue if there's a difference?

I saw that the post by "Nervous" shows that you spec your weight and the order will be supplied with the correct spring, which is awesome and definitely what you want, especially for the price point.
It's a shame the local Australian distributor doesn't do it and in my case it cost him a 3k sale, i went with Nitron simply because the distributor worked with me and supplied suspension to suit ME.

Not sure there would be any difference in the product, the Unit garage page does say the pic may be the previous version....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
660 Posts
Joe at Ride dynamics has an excellent reputation, his knowledge and attention to detail has made him a very in demand suspension guy in SE QLD.
What makes him so good is his willingness to share his knowledge and educate riders on how to understand what their bikes do and why, but more than that, he takes the time to check his set up one installed and is more than happy to tweak anything afterwards if you want to make changes.
Top bloke, and very helpful at track days/race meets too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
705 Posts
Joe at Ride dynamics has an excellent reputation, his knowledge and attention to detail has made him a very in demand suspension guy in SE QLD.
What makes him so good is his willingness to share his knowledge and educate riders on how to understand what their bikes do and why, but more than that, he takes the time to check his set up one installed and is more than happy to tweak anything afterwards if you want to make changes.
Top bloke, and very helpful at track days/race meets too.

Quite right, croppie. If only everyone in our game had Joe's desire to satisfy the customer. Illustrating this - my last post on this subject, I think. Shortly after this final tweaking was completed I took that bike on a ~4500km/ 12 day circuit up to Cooktown (FNQ) and back over some ordinary roads at times, and the transformation was amazing - I could not have been happier!

SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND

In an earlier post on this subject I stated that I didn't want to try to convince others here that my GT's K-Tech suspension upgrade gave a magic carpet ride. It was indeed a decided improvement over OE, but after my 1000+km circuit of a few weekends ago, over very widely-varying road surface conditions, I did feel - inexperienced in these matters as I am - that there may have been more to gain.

So today, back to Joe Salter at Ride Dynamics. I had gathered my thoughts, which in summary were that the rear shock seemed still to allow a little more harshness through than I'd have expected, and the front felt as if it was 'pitter-pattering' or 'chattering' over some very slight but closely-spaced corrugations - all very subtle, but still there.

Joe explained his intentions, and set-to. Working methodically as usual and without taking any breaks for a ciggie, a cuppa, or lengthy 'phone calls, off came the front fork legs for him to replace the 9.0 springs with slightly less-stiff 8.5 springs, which I mistakenly thought he'd installed first time out. This also entailed shortening the plastic sleeves inside the fork leg to accommodate the now-longer springs. This took about an hour of steady work.

Joe then turned his attention to the rear shock. Accessibility is not a strong point of the GT's rear suspension, but having the proper tools helps, and it was not long before two turns were taken out of the preload (increasing sag, for you sag-obsessives, by about 4-5mm): 7 clicks taken off the compression: and two clicks off the rebound.

All-up, about and hour-and-a-half's work - and in my ignorance I'd thought that few turns of a couple of screws would have fixed it! How wrong can you be!

But wait, there's more! After taking the bike for a short ride to check everything out, Joe returned, saying that he was going to change the springs in the front fork again: it seems that he detected some noise and surmised that the new springs may have been rubbing against the inside of each fork leg. If so, and if he'd left it at that it's more than likely I'd never have noticed it - or if I did wouldn't have had a clue as to what it was. Top marks, Joe.

Off came the fork legs again, no need to shorten the plastic sleeves, and a fresh pair of springs was quickly fitted. On measuring the new/ discarded springs it was found that they were over-size in diameter by a mere 0.75mm, a tiny amount but enough to cause some concern to Joe. Another test-ride, and he came back and gave a 'thumbs-up' signal on returning.

The entire job had taken about two hours of steady work, and of course I thanked Joe profusely, for he had also tightened the drive-chain that had developed far too much slack since new. "That's alright", he said, "you've paid for the job and I just want you to be happy". And indeed I am.

The ride home was Nirvana, and I cannot think that the suspension could be any better, suiting me to a tee. The front fork is fully settled with no signs of 'chattering', while the rear is now well-planted with no unwanted residual harshness. There's a total absence of 'pogo-sticking' or wallowing, and minor undulations in the road-surface are completely ironed-out. Time to go for another 1000km test-ride I think!

The new BAGSTER seat, now being made for me, will complete my comfort on this most excellent bike, and happiness will reign supreme.

Finally, I cannot recommend too highly the work and skills of Joe Salter at Ride Dynamics. I have no shares in his business, but I wish I did!

Pic below - at rear - the 'old' 9.0 spring taken out: front - the new 8.5 to be installed. Red shock is not mine!

P1050948.JPG

P1050949.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Finding objective rider feedback on Ohlins S46DR1L and STX46 DR1 is challenging. Most folk cannot swap and compare suspension setups just for grins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Are the NIX30 a good option for the RnineT 2016 Classic? I already installed a BM652 in the rear and saw a good improvement In road manners. Am wondering if there is any difference in the full fork set vs the inserts?

Also, can the inserts be DIY installed; rather is it something an amateur can do?

Am biting the bullet on the wunderlich sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
My BM640 showed up yesterday, I had the local shop throw it on my Scrambler this morning... it arrived with a 140 spring, rebound at 14 clicks, and about 5mm of preload mechanically set with the hydraulic adjuster backed off all the way.

I weigh 185 pounds and set my rider sag right at 40mm by adjusting preload to about 13mm.

First impression ride home with just the 5mm preload was this is way smoother than stock. More stable, fluid, and in control. Not bouncing and rattling. I haven’t ridden it after setting sag. Now to fine tune it.

I don’t have any free sag to speak of. Is 40mm the correct rider sag?
 
721 - 740 of 757 Posts
Top