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Quick question. After researching I am leaning towards changing the cartridges and rear shock to a Wilbers set up. My question is I have an R NineT Pure Low. Will the Wilbers set up raise my bike? I really like the Low's height. I am assuming they will match my height? Thanks in advance. Mike
 

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Question for you folks. I’ve found a used Wilburs 640 near me. It gives the length as 14.75”/375mm. Is that the stock length for a 2017+ Classic? I’m just after a better rear shock, the ride height as stock is perfect for me.

Thanks,
Hans
 

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Quick question. After researching I am leaning towards changing the cartridges and rear shock to a Wilbers set up. My question is I have an R NineT Pure Low. Will the Wilbers set up raise my bike? I really like the Low's height. I am assuming they will match my height? Thanks in advance. Mike
Wilbers are all made to order, so as long as you specify that you have the "low" version of the bike they will supply their shock to suit.
 

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Hoping for a bit of advice, I know very little about suspension setup but have decided to go with Wilbers 640 rear shock upgrade. The Wilbers UK distributor is also going to do the install as they are quite local. I spoke to them about front forks also, and they suggested installing progressive springs (already reaching limit of knowledge here) so I thought I'd browse this thread for advice. Looks like there is some experience but also talk of fork emulators which look quite technical in terms of installation. I'm inclined to go with the recommendation, as opposed to new cartridge set which are many £'s. The primary reason for the upgrade is improved handling that I've read about and importantly improved comfort for rides +1hr. Any thoughts before I commit? thanks.
 

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@JonWA I think what you are doing will bring good results at the rear end. The front end alteration is possibly the minimum amount of work that would produce a gain, and it's worth trying especially if budget is limited.
 

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It is worth trying fork springs as stock they can be a little too hard (depending on your weight) where new progressive springs will be less stiff in the initial stroke but still resist bottoming under heavy braking. Just make sure you get the fork 'sag' set with correct spacers for your weight.
Its also worth playing with fork oil weight and height as this also makes a difference. Its not too tricky to play with oil height, less oil makes the front softer and lower, more oil increases stiffness under braking etc. Ultimately though, fork emulators make a significant difference to the damping quality at the front but are trickier to install and setup but arent expensive at under £100 to buy. The 36mm YSS emulators work fine and there are plenty of suppliers in UK. Racetech gold emulators better still but more expensive. Or spend over £600 on replacement internals from the main vendors with adjustments and proper damping valves. I went with progressive springs, less oil and YSS emulators and are happy with the results. I did this in stages.
 

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@BaldyDave @hocks thanks both. From what I've read the YSS emulators are an improvement over progressive springs, although marginal and trickier install as you say. The next step looks like cartridge set at another £900 (open) or £1,360 (closed), and I don't really have a feel for what difference that expenditure would make over the less costly alternative. It's quite a big step over the £250 ish for installed progressive springs and oil. Wilbers comment was if I definitely planned on keeping the bike long term the expensive upgrade might make sense, otherwise to go with springs and see how it goes. The total cost of rear shock and cartridge fork upgrade would be quite a big proportion of the bikes value, maybe 25%, which does seem quite a lot. While I'm used to that sort of equation on my mountain bikes in the past it, does seem a big bite just now and the staged approach might make sense. I'll have another chat with Wilbers. Very much looking forward to the upgrades either way. Many thanks for comments, much appreciated (y)
 

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@BaldyDave @hocks thanks both. From what I've read the YSS emulators are an improvement over progressive springs, although marginal and trickier install as you say. The next step looks like cartridge set at another £900 (open) or £1,360 (closed), and I don't really have a feel for what difference that expenditure would make over the less costly alternative. It's quite a big step over the £250 ish for installed progressive springs and oil. Wilbers comment was if I definitely planned on keeping the bike long term the expensive upgrade might make sense, otherwise to go with springs and see how it goes. The total cost of rear shock and cartridge fork upgrade would be quite a big proportion of the bikes value, maybe 25%, which does seem quite a lot. While I'm used to that sort of equation on my mountain bikes in the past it, does seem a big bite just now and the staged approach might make sense. I'll have another chat with Wilbers. Very much looking forward to the upgrades either way. Many thanks for comments, much appreciated (y)
JonWA
Its a fairly easy job to swap fork springs and oil. The progressive fork spring upgrade would then only cost you £135. The only DIY tricky bit is lifting the bike front end off the ground. You have the same issue when swapping a new front tyre, so solve the lift and its money well spent anyway.
Measuring the fork level can be done with a simple steel ruler and a syringe and pipe to remove too much oil. You can also then easily adjust or replace fork oil if you need to in the future.
Just my thoughts and if your not comfortable messing with the bike, thats sensible to get the shop to sort.

The wilbers fork cartridge are a lot more expensive than ohlins or nitron or andreani as they supply new tubes for the bigger damping valves. That is a top end expensive upgrade!
I think id go for Nitron fork cartridge and springs in the UK as they are superb quality.
 

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@hocks thanks, that sounds sensible. I might hold on the fork springs and look at Nitron, see how things go with the new rear shock. I'd be reasonably comfortable doing the work myself, but lifting the bike to unweight the suspension is the issue, which is partly why I'm not doing the rear shock myself. Abba lifts are no longer in production and I previously seemed to go around in circles looking at other options. In the absence of an Abba stand, the best option would seem to be a rear wheel paddock stand to stabilise the bike and a scissor lift. Maybe I really should have this kit anyway. That or I just get someone else to do the forks in due course.
 

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@hocks thanks, that sounds sensible. I might hold on the fork springs and look at Nitron, see how things go with the new rear shock. I'd be reasonably comfortable doing the work myself, but lifting the bike to unweight the suspension is the issue, which is partly why I'm not doing the rear shock myself. Abba lifts are no longer in production and I previously seemed to go around in circles looking at other options. In the absence of an Abba stand, the best option would seem to be a rear wheel paddock stand to stabilise the bike and a scissor lift. Maybe I really should have this kit anyway. That or I just get someone else to do the forks in due course.
There are reasonably priced temporary centre stands that you mount into the two big holes either side in the sump area. Just search on fleabay or similar, they are about £100 but Ive seen them cheaper on offer. These you can change either wheel etc.
I put 'bmw rninet centre stand' as a search.
 

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@hocks thanks, I'll do that search. The dealership workshop recommended a lift under the sump when I spoke to them earlier, and I found a meaty looking hydraulic lift for just over £100, not the cheapest or the most expensive but looks ok.
 

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Does anyone have experience with closed cartridges from Wilbers? After their installation, I have a stroke of 140mm compared to OEM 120mm. I dont know if it is correct or did I get the wrong length cartridges?
133852
133854
133853
 

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I installed Olhins Nix 22 cartridges, and a Wilbers BM 642 shock, a couple of weeks ago. I found both the front and the rear stiff out of the box, but the bike handling improved a lot. It feels on rails.
I did a trip last week, and the rear shock particularly, was killing my (problematic) back, specially at high speed bumps.
My technician told me that the only way to soften the suspension on high speed bumps, keeping the better handling that the new setup provides, is to revalve the hydraulic system.
Anyone have done it? Anyone else found the new suspensions stiff out of the box?
 

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SDC, before you do anything else , back off the rebound damping adjust a couple clicks at a time and ride for bit and see if anything feels different. Did you just leave the unit as it was out of the box or did you set the sag and adjust damping after fitting to the bike?
 

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Mr SDC I just realised the 642 unit also has the compression damping adjustability, obvious question , have you tried backing the compression damping off??
 

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SDC, before you do anything else , back off the rebound damping adjust a couple clicks at a time and ride for bit and see if anything feels different. Did you just leave the unit as it was out of the box or did you set the sag and adjust damping after fitting to the bike?
Thanks for your reply @vagueout
I first tried the setup out of the box, then the tech did a few adjustments (pre load).
Next week i will bring again the bike to the shop. Before anything i will ask them to measure the negative sag and go from there.
On the trip i did, i’ve tried to back off the rebound, but i started to feel the bike to “springy”, kind of bypassing the hydraulic action of the shock, leaving me without confidence. The shock became softer, but i felt the high speed bumps the same way.
I will also try to back off the high speed compression a few clicks today.
 

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Highly recommend taking it to a suspension expert that can properly set your preload/sag first and set your compression and rebound accordingly...I wouldn't let BMW dealership touch the suspension adjustment
 

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Highly recommend taking it to a suspension expert that can properly set your preload/sag first and set your compression and rebound accordingly...I wouldn't let BMW dealership touch the suspension adjustment
I took my bike to a suspension shop, not a bmw dealership.
 
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