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Ducati Scrambler, Triumph Thruxton, Indian FTR, Moto Guzzi V7/V9 etc.

All of them are just below Ninet.

Ninet = 1200cc /110HP (euro4), 17L Steel Tank provides good range (18L? aluminum), wired throttel (euro4)*, dry clutch (clean oil for motor and not mixing with gearbox etc), cardan/bevel transmision (not dirty chain), 180mm rear tire, alloy rims or tubeless spoke rims (UGS even new Roadster euro5?), 320mm brake discs, Brembo brake-calipers, self supporting trellis chassis. Single swingarm (Beautiful wheel view)...etc

There is no bike with all of this on the whole.

Then Ninet is not only a beautiful bike. It´s enough fun, enough easy, enough comfortable. It is a well balanced bike. You can use for commuting, for travelling or what ever you want.

The only real limit is pillion. But others kind of classics bikes have the same problem.

*New electronic throttel euro5 Ninet I recognized don´t like. I think Ninet lost a bit of his essence and soul but in the end I will choose Ninet again because others bike have already electronic throttel too.
I totally agree. After I own the R9T , there is no other bike that gives me this happy feeling :)
 

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Well I've owned a Thruxton R for about 5 years and an R9T for about 2 years. The R9T is box stock with the exception of a tachometer, handle bar risers and throttle lock. I've run a 11.746 @118.49 mph in the quarter mile and that would be 11.192 at sea level so it's pretty quick.

My stock Thruxton R had a best of 12.055 @113.36 mph, however with a cam the Thruxton R is a shade quicker at 11.678 @119.42 mph.

Both bikes have embarrassed bigger, faster bikes at the drag strip and that isn't there real calling card. I can't choose between them on looks, the R9T is a bit more comfortable but the Thruxton R is a bit better handler.

You can choose one over the other but not me...I choose both you can't go wrong.
 

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2017 R9T Classic
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107 Posts
I looked at a number of the classic or retro styled bikes before I got the R9T. While I was researching and looking at various bikes I fell in love with the cafe racer style so R9T racer and Thruxton RS were my top choices. I was also fond of the CB1000R a sort of modern cafe racer. What ending up doing it for me is I found a used R9T classic nearby and I just fit a lot better on it than I did on the other bikes. I am coming back to riding after a 17 year hiatus and wanted something that inspired some confidence. The R9T ergonomics did that and as much as I wanted the Racer the rider triangle was too much and it would have been several thousands more than the better equipped used model.

While it's not slow, TBH most bikes with 100hp aren't slow I do see myself eventually getting something more sport oriented as a second bike. Panigale V2, Hayabusa, H2 or something like that.

I have not grown to love the boxer sound (I had a Subaru STI so I'm familiar with boxers I think the UEL headers made the subie boxer sound better), I don't dislike it it just isn't as melodious as a 270 crank twin or the scream of a 4.
 

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I looked at a number of the classic or retro styled bikes before I got the R9T. While I was researching and looking at various bikes I fell in love with the cafe racer style so R9T racer and Thruxton RS were my top choices. I was also fond of the CB1000R a sort of modern cafe racer. What ending up doing it for me is I found a used R9T classic nearby and I just fit a lot better on it than I did on the other bikes. I am coming back to riding after a 17 year hiatus and wanted something that inspired some confidence. The R9T ergonomics did that and as much as I wanted the Racer the rider triangle was too much and it would have been several thousands more than the better equipped used model.

While it's not slow, TBH most bikes with 100hp aren't slow I do see myself eventually getting something more sport oriented as a second bike. Panigale V2, Hayabusa, H2 or something like that.

I have not grown to love the boxer sound (I had a Subaru STI so I'm familiar with boxers I think the UEL headers made the subie boxer sound better), I don't dislike it it just isn't as melodious as a 270 crank twin or the scream of a 4.
In 2016 I had a slightly modified Zx1400R with just over 200 horsepower at the rear wheel and rode briefly on the street after running 196 mph at Bonneville. For me the Zx1400R was way too much for the street....you have to be thinking a lot further out to stay out of trouble.

The problem for me using the same amount of throttle that I use on my R9T got me in license revocation territory a lot.

I just found I happier being able to use most of my horsepower all the time more fun than only being able to use small amount of my big horsepower hardly any of the time.
 

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BMW R nineT Pure
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In 2016 I had a slightly modified Zx1400R with just over 200 horsepower at the rear wheel and rode briefly on the street after running 196 mph at Bonneville. For me the Zx1400R was way too much for the street....you have to be thinking a lot further out to stay out of trouble.

The problem for me using the same amount of throttle that I use on my R9T got me in license revocation territory a lot.

I just found I happier being able to use most of my horsepower all the time more fun than only being able to use small amount of my big horsepower hardly any of the time.
My previous bike, a 6th gen. Honda VFR, had about 100 hp. Even loaded for touring (solo rider, no pillion) it was enough for me. The R9T has about 110 hp, but more torque than the VFR. And it's still enough for me. Straight-line speed can be exhilarating, but also quite expensive when you get lit up by the police. Besides, I'd rather go fast (Well, fast for me anyway. ;)) in the corners, and the power on tap from my boxer twin is more than adequate.
 

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For me it's just a different style of riding and occasionally I'd want a full fairing for wind protection. The R9T is my first bike that wasn't a sport bike and its a bit hard getting used to only have 8,500RPM. Don't get me wrong I enjoy it, rode it to work today but occasionally I think I'd like to have something with a bit more grunt and you can duck behind some wind protection is all.

In the retro classic class I think it's one of the best.
 

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2016 RNineT Classic
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In 2016 I had a slightly modified Zx1400R with just over 200 horsepower at the rear wheel and rode briefly on the street after running 196 mph at Bonneville.
I just found I happier being able to use most of my horsepower all the time more fun than only being able to use small amount of my big horsepower hardly any of the time.
Respect, 196mph on a bike is not shabby at all. That’s certainly a pace where you’re not a distracted driver anymore;-)
“Speed has never killed anyone. It’s the sudden stop that gives you a headache”
Jeremy Clarkson
 

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Respect, 196mph on a bike is not shabby at all. That’s certainly a pace where you’re not a distracted driver anymore;-)
“Speed has never killed anyone. It’s the sudden stop that gives you a headache”
Jeremy Clarkson
I took about 8 shots at averaging a mile at 200 mph but fell just short.

I got a video where I almost (6 inches) clipped a timing device and flag at over 190 mph. I pushed hard enough to call it done. The guy after me wasn't so lucky and clipped a flag and his bike's wreckage was spread well over a quarter of a mile.
 

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My other bike is a Sport Classic 1000, which is quite a bit older than the R9T, much less comfortable, better looking, and puts out a better sound. But by all other measures, the R9T wins, and is the one I ride all the time.
 

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2021 Scrambler
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Back in '08, I desperately wanted the Duc SC 1000. I rode everything that HD made at the time and none of them had suitable ergos for me. The Ducati felt better, lighter, and more fun. It is also dead beautiful. I was set on using it for commuting though and it did not have anything like a decent accessory market. That pushed me over into the BMW showroom. I wound up with an R1200GS and loved it. Years later, I finally have the retro itch scratched with my '21 scrambler.

I looked at Triumph and Ducati before picking up my scrambler and for simple riding fun, the Monster 1200 and R 1200 R were in the running until the end. Either may still end up in my garage in time.
 

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How do you like the Scrambler in comparison to the R1200GS? That's another bike I was interested in but the BMW had more displacement (*but now there's an 1100 Scrambler)
 

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2021 Scrambler
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How do you like the Scrambler in comparison to the R1200GS? That's another bike I was interested in but the BMW had more displacement (*but now there's an 1100 Scrambler)
They are completely different. The GS was (and is) a technological marvel. All I did was add bags and engine bars, as that was all it needed. It was an excellent commuter (I had a long commute at the time) and was the best bike I've owned for long-haul touring. That assumes you want to feel like you're riding a motorcycle over lounging on Lazy-boy. Bikes with huge fairings, sound systems, and the like don't feel like riding to me. I did not particularly like the culture that a lot of GS owners had at the time. Lots of dudes with more money than sense and a superiority complex, but that's not the bike. Over time, you begin to feel like you need a full riding suit, a rain suit, helmets with com systems and heated gear, and a lot of other image stuff that ultimately seems to get in the way. If I needed a bike for camping, long highway commuting, or touring, it would still be near the top of my list.

Or if you are a genuine adventure rider (logging roads, dunes, desert riding, gravel trips, etc) suitable for the bike, then it's great. Lots of folks seem to confuse it for an enduro or trails bike and it's not the best option for those. I think of them as excellent Swiss Army knives. They can do most of what you are likely to throw at them and a lot of that, they do very well. If you specialize in specific types of off-roading, there is probably a better option out there.

I have not been on the 1100 Scrambler, but it looks great and is more of a real scrambler than the current BMW. For me, 98-99% of my riding will be on pavement, so the BMW fits the bill best.

The BMW scrambler is all I have at the moment and I am loving how comparatively simple it is. Easy and cheaper to own/accessorize (than the GS) and a blast to ride.
 

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Ducati Scrambler, Triumph Thruxton, Indian FTR, Moto Guzzi V7/V9 etc.

All of them are just below Ninet.

Ninet = 1200cc /110HP (euro4), 17L Steel Tank provides good range (18L? aluminum), wired throttel (euro4)*, dry clutch (clean oil for motor and not mixing with gearbox etc), cardan/bevel transmision (not dirty chain), 180mm rear tire, alloy rims or tubeless spoke rims (UGS even new Roadster euro5?), 320mm brake discs, Brembo brake-calipers, self supporting trellis chassis. Single swingarm (Beautiful wheel view)...etc

There is no bike with all of this on the whole.

Then Ninet is not only a beautiful bike. It´s enough fun, enough easy, enough comfortable. It is a well balanced bike. You can use for commuting, for travelling or what ever you want.

The only real limit is pillion. But others kind of classics bikes have the same problem.

*New electronic throttel euro5 Ninet I recognized don´t like. I think Ninet lost a bit of his essence and soul but in the end I will choose Ninet again because others bike have already electronic throttel too.
Man, I’m with you all the way Lelc2. I just never saw NOT being able to have a passenger as a diss-advantage … Heck, I often use it as an excuse to refuse to ride someone. This is not a motorbike to take a date for a drink or across country … this bike (Blitz) rides only one ….ME…. That’s part of the thrill. I ride completely different with a passenger than I do solo … that’s WHY I ride solo. I guess if you pick any bike you can find some rider that fits it perfectly, well that’s how the 9T fits me … almost out of the crate from day 1, a few ergonomic modifications and were good to go. I love this bike … she’s number 14 and the last in a long line of oil dripping loud engine popping fast as lightning two wheeled death traps as I’ll ever have the pleasure of risking my neck to sit on and hold on too…. Nicest machine I’ve ever owned or ever will. BeWell but have fun, time is shorter than you think. ….Blitz
 

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2020,R Nine T Racer
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315 Posts
Interesting to read the thread and see what draw owners to the nine t. The nine t and all the "cafe racer" bikes never drew my interest as bikes are expensive and you buy the best tool for the job, for me the GS as well. A bit of a lazy-boy vs some of the other bikes these days. Then I got the nine at a very good price and still suffering from the effects of Covid 19 bought it(the only time the wife agreed that it really was a bargain). I would love to try the Triumphs, Ducatis, Japanese bikes, etc but I really grew to love the Racer and it is not the fact that you can "bling" it, in any event very expensive for us, but lies in the challenge of riding it. The suspension really goes back to the eighties. For me that was it. If you ever owned a "classic" you will know that you always work on them, spare parts are scarce, even the Japanese bikes and the skills to service them are becoming less. I will keep the suspension standard stay in contact with my physiotherapist and enjoy the ride experience and fun of the bike in this genre. Man that GS is super expensive and I feel guilty everytime I ride it. Will I try the other bikes, yes. The problem is that everytime I drive the bike to a dealer to sell I hesitate. Once in my life I sold a bike that gave me a lot of satisfaction and to this day regret it. The replacement bike was better, but it was expensive and did not offer that much of an improvement. In any event. If you keep a bike, rather use the cash to buy more bikes instead of spending it to make up the balance of cost of a replacement bike.
 

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Husqvarna Svartpilen 401, Nine T Scrambler soon
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The only big no I see on the nineT is the lack of instruments.
Come on, no gear indicator, no fuel gauge, no rev, WTF????

My husqvarna Svartpilen has a small round dash (electronic) and all is there.
Ideally, I'll like the analog for the rev, speed/gear/range/fuel on the LCD, there is room for that.
 

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2020,R Nine T Racer
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The only big no I see on the nineT is the lack of instruments.
Come on, no gear indicator, no fuel gauge, no rev, WTF????

My husqvarna Svartpilen has a small round dash (electronic) and all is there.
Ideally, I'll like the analog for the rev, speed/gear/range/fuel on the LCD, there is room for that.
The Racer has both clocks that show the revs and gear you are in. The one I miss is the reading for ambient temperature and the fuel gauge, yes that one would be nice. You soon learn to monitor riding distance, make sure you zero when filling up and monitor speed and fuel consumption and plan the stops in advance. Fortunately with so many bikes on the market we get to choose the bike we like. What bothered me on new 1250 gs was initially fuel consumption. After selling the 1200 gs and paying so much extra, I found that the fuel consumption was substantially more and that really irritated me. For now it is sorted, still sad having sold that 1200 though. I do not want all the lazy-boy stuff.
 

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The only big no I see on the nineT is the lack of instruments.
Come on, no gear indicator, no fuel gauge, no rev, WTF????

My husqvarna Svartpilen has a small round dash (electronic) and all is there.
Ideally, I'll like the analog for the rev, speed/gear/range/fuel on the LCD, there is room for that.
Lest I forget, the problem for us on the southern tip of Africa are often, the availability of service centers, spares, import taxes and subsequently less choice, We do not get the Honda 500, simply because Honda South Africa is not prepared to keep stock of spares (10 years) of a bike that they think will not sell well. Personally would love to buy that bike for the wife. Plus we have vast distances between towns, not as bad as Australia and North America, but still enough so that when you have an issue you need dealer support. In South Africa BMW won that battle. They give road side assist, if the bike breaks down they will collect, free of charge anywhere. "Anywhere" can often be in the middle of a desert. Used it once after I came off the bike on a wet road covered with diesel and oil. I was sore and simply wanted to get home. Phoned them they organized everything, first offered ambulance and medical service, which I stupidly refused and then collected me and bike and at that point could not care what they did with bike. 😄 So we often purchase a bike, maybe for all the wrong reasons.
 

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2021 Scrambler
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35 Posts
The only big no I see on the nineT is the lack of instruments.
Come on, no gear indicator, no fuel gauge, no rev, WTF????

My husqvarna Svartpilen has a small round dash (electronic) and all is there.
Ideally, I'll like the analog for the rev, speed/gear/range/fuel on the LCD, there is room for that.
Before buying, I thought those would be issues as well. I had the second clock add-on in my budget, but held off. Now, I am enjoying that it drives a stronger connection with the bike as I ride. To each, their own. :)
 

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BMW R nineT Pure
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1,501 Posts
Before buying, I thought those would be issues as well. I had the second clock add-on in my budget, but held off. Now, I am enjoying that it drives a stronger connection with the bike as I ride. To each, their own. :)
I added the OEM tachometer this spring, and I really like having it. When I bought my R9T Pure a year ago I didn't think I'd miss having a tachometer too much, and I've never had a gear indicator on a motorcycle, so no biggie there. But there were so many times I tried clicking up a gear on the freeway but was already in 6th, or tried to click down another gear coming to a stop but was already in 1st. I could still live without it, but I'd want either a tach OR a gear indicator, and it's nice to have both. Plus it's kind of entertaining thumbing through the different screens on both clocks.

By the way, I bought my second clock kit slightly used here on the forum. Avoid buying brand new from the dealer if possible, and you'll save money. Actually, that goes for many different mods! :)
 
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