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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

With the good season, MotoGP and SBK championships started tickling the little Kevin Schwanz inside of me. Being aware of the risks on the road, I bought a leather suit and now I'm trying to figure out how to bring the boxer on track.

Just FYI, I'm probably in the worst country on the world for track riding: Switzerland. Here tracks are banned since decades. Closest ones are across the border in France or Italy. We are talking about 2, 3 or even 4hrs ride before getting there.

Long story short, I had few experiences knee down on a track years ago with my beloved Aprilia RS. Thirteen years later I got back on a bike and after one year of riding it, I think it's time for us to get a little more intimate.

So the questions for you 9T track riders are:

- As owner of a motorcycle that wasn't really intended for track days, what should I consider/keep in mind before booking a session?
- Besides few aesthetic changes the bike is absolutely stock. I know the list of "recommended improvements" can be long, but is it safe to take 9T as it is on track?
- Any circuit recommendations (considering the distance from Zurich)?
- What is it going to touch first, pegs or cylinder covers?

Thanks in advance to anyone that will take the time to share some advice!
 

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Hey guys!



With the good season, MotoGP and SBK championships started tickling the little Kevin Schwanz inside of me. Being aware of the risks on the road, I bought a leather suit and now I'm trying to figure out how to bring the boxer on track.



Just FYI, I'm probably in the worst country on the world for track riding: Switzerland. Here tracks are banned since decades. Closest ones are across the border in France or Italy. We are talking about 2, 3 or even 4hrs ride before getting there.



Long story short, I had few experiences knee down on a track years ago with my beloved Aprilia RS. Thirteen years later I got back on a bike and after one year of riding it, I think it's time for us to get a little more intimate.



So the questions for you 9T track riders are:



- As owner of a motorcycle that wasn't really intended for track days, what should I consider/keep in mind before booking a session?

- Besides few aesthetic changes the bike is absolutely stock. I know the list of "recommended improvements" can be long, but is it safe to take 9T as it is on track?

- Any circuit recommendations (considering the distance from Zurich)?

- What is it going to touch first, pegs or cylinder covers?



Thanks in advance to anyone that will take the time to share some advice!


I've taken my R9T out for a track day.

First comment, any bike you can ride on the road can be safe and fun on a track. So, just do it.

Now if you're planning to push hard. The suspension is crap.

If you are in a corner and going hard that rear shock will not keep the tyre planted if you hit any bumps.

I've put top of the line adjustable Wilbers front (cartridge), rear shock, and an Ohlins damper. I no longer think the bike is trying to kill me when I push it.

Actually last weekend the suspension saved me. I hit a bump in a tight but fast corner that landed me on another bump going to other way - bike was twisting and bucking but the suspension just handled it and got rubber down without drama. I know I would have been off with the OEM crap.

I've lowered my pegs by 20 mm but also changed them out to a lower profile - no nipple sticking off the bottom of the pegs.

I also put on new tyres, Dunlop GT3's. I had plenty of traction.

I've put narrower and lower bars, which helps load up some weight on the front tyre.

I also have an ecu engine tune, but that really was marginal - more about getting rid of the too lean OEM tune and idle to power smoothness.

For me, the it was the foot controls that scrapped first, especially the right hand side rear brake. I wasn't really happy.

A very good racer, he's set a class lap record at the IOM TT, told me I was riding the bike wrong. He wanted me to hang off the side of the bike (like the modern GP racers) but also keep the bike fairly upright to avoid the controls scraping. So, not leaning and getting a knee down, but having most of my body off the side while the bike is not leaning that much. Was too hard for me, so I just backed off a touch so the controls no longer scrapped.

This is more of a point and shoot bike. You can brake quite late, and get on the power quite early (enjoy that torque) but you want to be a bit delicate in the meat of the corner - much more so if you have stock. suspension.

So, if you know what you're doing, ignore all that and go fang it.

If you're new to this, regardless of the set up go have fun.

D



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalkj
 

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- As owner of a motorcycle that wasn't really intended for track days, what should I consider/keep in mind before booking a session?
Keep in mind that these engines tend to eat oil. Bring extra and check it after every session.

- Besides few aesthetic changes the bike is absolutely stock. I know the list of "recommended improvements" can be long, but is it safe to take 9T as it is on track?
Just ride it stock. It'll take the abuse. The suspension is fine, but nothing great. You'll feel the back end doing some squirrley stuff but it takes the abuse.

- Any circuit recommendations (considering the distance from Zurich)?
Can't comment

- What is it going to touch first, pegs or cylinder covers?
Pegs for sure. I ground my to tiny stubs and the cylinder never touched (came close though).
 

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Here tracks are banned since decades. Closest ones are across the border in France or Italy. We are talking about 2, 3 or even 4hrs ride before getting there.
My suggestion would be to not ride your bike to the track. Trailer it. The problem with riding it there is that it's your means of getting home and that will be in your head the whole time you're on the track. Makes it little more than a fast ride down your favorite (usually deserted) twisty section of road. By riding to the track you're bringing with you the same limitations.
 

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I agree with trailering the bike. The closest track to me is about a 3 hour drive so I'll camp overnight, race, camp again, then go home. It's a whole weekend, but it's fun. I suppose I could do it all in one day, but I'd be exhausted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Spot on Dave, thanks. I'll check these out!

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very factual and detailed set of suggestions. I appreciate that drotor!

On the suspensions, I noticed 2 things on the road.

Hitting hard on the brakes the forks go way too easily on full locks. The bike is solid and keeps the line, however this behavior doesn't give me tons of confidence. The return is fairly progressive, but it feels like the weight shifts too early towards the back of the bike. I might be biased, as the riding position is upright an might be just a feeling. Lowsides scare the s***e out of me.

The damper is a little too soft in the return, so I can see what you are saying.

I've taken my R9T out for a track day.

First comment, any bike you can ride on the road can be safe and fun on a track. So, just do it.

Now if you're planning to push hard. The suspension is crap.

If you are in a corner and going hard that rear shock will not keep the tyre planted if you hit any bumps.

I've put top of the line adjustable Wilbers front (cartridge), rear shock, and an Ohlins damper. I no longer think the bike is trying to kill me when I push it.

Actually last weekend the suspension saved me. I hit a bump in a tight but fast corner that landed me on another bump going to other way - bike was twisting and bucking but the suspension just handled it and got rubber down without drama. I know I would have been off with the OEM crap.

I've lowered my pegs by 20 mm but also changed them out to a lower profile - no nipple sticking off the bottom of the pegs.

I also put on new tyres, Dunlop GT3's. I had plenty of traction.

I've put narrower and lower bars, which helps load up some weight on the front tyre.

I also have an ecu engine tune, but that really was marginal - more about getting rid of the too lean OEM tune and idle to power smoothness.

For me, the it was the foot controls that scrapped first, especially the right hand side rear brake. I wasn't really happy.

A very good racer, he's set a class lap record at the IOM TT, told me I was riding the bike wrong. He wanted me to hang off the side of the bike (like the modern GP racers) but also keep the bike fairly upright to avoid the controls scraping. So, not leaning and getting a knee down, but having most of my body off the side while the bike is not leaning that much. Was too hard for me, so I just backed off a touch so the controls no longer scrapped.

This is more of a point and shoot bike. You can brake quite late, and get on the power quite early (enjoy that torque) but you want to be a bit delicate in the meat of the corner - much more so if you have stock. suspension.

So, if you know what you're doing, ignore all that and go fang it.

If you're new to this, regardless of the set up go have fun.

D



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalkj
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fair enough. Unfortunately I have no chance to get a trailer right now (limited parking space) and, in all honesty, in that case I even thought to add on top a couple grand to get a 2001-2003 600cc supersport and trash it with total piece of mind :biggrin:

My suggestion would be to not ride your bike to the track. Trailer it. The problem with riding it there is that it's your means of getting home and that will be in your head the whole time you're on the track. Makes it little more than a fast ride down your favorite (usually deserted) twisty section of road. By riding to the track you're bringing with you the same limitations.
I agree with trailering the bike. The closest track to me is about a 3 hour drive so I'll camp overnight, race, camp again, then go home. It's a whole weekend, but it's fun. I suppose I could do it all in one day, but I'd be exhausted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's one **** of action shot. Thanks for the suggestions Trappist.

Nice lean angle, stock tires? Looks like knee down is not a mirage despite those bad boys sticking out on the sides...

- As owner of a motorcycle that wasn't really intended for track days, what should I consider/keep in mind before booking a session?
Keep in mind that these engines tend to eat oil. Bring extra and check it after every session.

- Besides few aesthetic changes the bike is absolutely stock. I know the list of "recommended improvements" can be long, but is it safe to take 9T as it is on track?
Just ride it stock. It'll take the abuse. The suspension is fine, but nothing great. You'll feel the back end doing some squirrley stuff but it takes the abuse.

- Any circuit recommendations (considering the distance from Zurich)?
Can't comment

- What is it going to touch first, pegs or cylinder covers?
Pegs for sure. I ground my to tiny stubs and the cylinder never touched (came close though).
 

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Hey guys!

With the good season, MotoGP and SBK championships started tickling the little Kevin Schwanz inside of me. Being aware of the risks on the road, I bought a leather suit and now I'm trying to figure out how to bring the boxer on track.

Just FYI, I'm probably in the worst country on the world for track riding: Switzerland. Here tracks are banned since decades. Closest ones are across the border in France or Italy. We are talking about 2, 3 or even 4hrs ride before getting there.

Long story short, I had few experiences knee down on a track years ago with my beloved Aprilia RS. Thirteen years later I got back on a bike and after one year of riding it, I think it's time for us to get a little more intimate.

So the questions for you 9T track riders are:

  • As owner of a motorcycle that wasn't really intended for track days, what should I consider/keep in mind before booking a session?
  • Besides few aesthetic changes the bike is absolutely stock. I know the list of "recommended improvements" can be long, but is it safe to take 9T as it is on track?
  • Any circuit recommendations (considering the distance from Zurich)?
  • What is it going to touch first, pegs or cylinder covers?

Thanks in advance to anyone that will take the time to share some advice!
In short...the R9T is a great ride on the track. Stock suspension was the only upgrade I've enjoyed but the OEM still provide plenty of fun. Sorry to hear of your need to travel a bit but go for it. You won't be disappointed.
 

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I've ridden on track with Nate at Roebling... or better I should say I was on track when he was also on track because it would not be accurate to say we were riding together. More like he was pulling away from me in the corners like I had parked the bike. That launch he did in the video to start the race is epic.
 
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