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Since the first of august the 95 octane fuel here in Sweden contains 10% of ethanol. BMW claims ”All models are compatible with E10. However the number of octanes needs to be compatible with the model according to user handbook”. And so far I have not experienced anything different from before. I asked a workmate who converted his old Saab for E85 if there has been any issues with it, and he said no. He has to change engine oil twice a year and when he dismantled the engine it was much cleaner than when he ran it on fossil petrol. Apparently has the quality of the ethanol increased over the years and should not damage the engines.

When reading earlier posts here on the forum it seems like Americans have had problems with E10, at least on other vehicles. Have you noticed any problems coming from using E10 over time? What about hoses and gaskets - how are they after a couple of years?
 

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BMW R nineT Urban G/S - Edition 40 years GS
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Since the UK introduced E5 I have used an additive to the petrol I put in my garden machinery because it has destroyed the rubber fuel pick up lines in the tank. I don't use it in my vehicles because they all have 'E5' & 'E10' on or near the petrol cap/filler.
E10 has just been introduced in the UK.

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Back in the early 90's I had a Black BMW R1100GS, they had just replaced the plastic tanks with metal ones when I bought mine:- Ethanol????
Search the internet on the subject.
 

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I've only had my 2020 R9T Pure a little over one year, but have put over 12,000 miles on it since buying it new. I use "Premium" only (92 or 93 octane here in the US) and I've not experienced any fueling issues at all.

I previously owned a 2004 Honda VFR 800, aka Interceptor, for over 14 years. When I sold it last fall the odometer was at 101,000 miles. There are a few gas stations around which sell pure gasoline with no additives or ethanol, though it's more expensive than regular 87 octane at the other stations. I filled up at one such station several times over the years, but 99% of my fill-ups were with the regular stuff, with some ethanol and additives. Again, I never had a single fueling issue or problems with fuel lines, hoses, or gaskets.

As long as you're running higher octane fuel I think you'll be fine.
 

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I now run non-ethenol on all my bikes. Plus everything in the garage.

I ran out of gas on my HD Road King with efi. Couldn't get the bike started. after weeks of troubleshooting I drained and flushed the tank twice. There was so much ethanol sludge at the bottom of the tank the bike would not start. Not worth the trouble. Use better gas.
 

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E-10 in the USA has the notorious reputation of destroying rubber hoses on motorcycles and on small engines. Also if E-10 is left sittting inside the carb it will quickly gum/plug up your jets or FI passages. I avoid E-10 in all of my bikes.
 

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2021 R nineT Option 719, Triumph Bobber
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I now run non-ethenol on all my bikes. Plus everything in the garage.

I ran out of gas on my HD Road King with efi. Couldn't get the bike started. after weeks of troubleshooting I drained and flushed the tank twice. There was so much ethanol sludge at the bottom of the tank the bike would not start. Not worth the trouble. Use better gas.
Easier said than done. The UK adopted the EU mandated fuel regs. so regular now has 10% ethanol and the premium has 5%. I tend to put the premium in. If you really are bothered about it you can extract the ethanol or buy lawnmower petrol which has zero ethanol, but you would need deep pockets. OP I would ride more, worry less. Provided you dont let it sit for a long time it shouldn't absorb too much water and the fuel lines are designed to run on this. Older cars and bikes aren't so they will have issues.
 

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modern engines and fuel systems are prepared for the use of 10% Ethanol and even more. Main problems are the ("rubber") fuel lines and gaskets and the fact that E10+ is not stabile for very long, when sitting undisturbed in the tank. It draws more water than regular petrol and can have difficulties burning after sitting just a few weeks in tanks and reservoirs. modern injection systems with fuel pumps just flush more of the gunk through, but older carburetors can have a really hard time with E5 and E10.
Apart from all the technical issues there is the fact that we are actually using agricultural areas meant for food production to produce the "Ethanol" for the fuel. I.e. more fuel less grub :-( And all that just to fiddle with and beautify the emission figures.....
I don't touch the stuff with a barge pole - for the latter reason
regards
Bernhard
 

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Easier said than done. The UK adopted the EU mandated fuel regs. so regular now has 10% ethanol and the premium has 5%. I tend to put the premium in. If you really are bothered about it you can extract the ethanol or buy lawnmower petrol which has zero ethanol, but you would need deep pockets. OP I would ride more, worry less. Provided you dont let it sit for a long time it shouldn't absorb too much water and the fuel lines are designed to run on this. Older cars and bikes aren't so they will have issues.
Hope you never have to learn the hard way.
 

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Non-ethanol fuel is not available in my area (and most urban areas in the US I believe). If it was, I'd use it. That said, I've never used anything but E10 in any of my bikes and have had no compatibility issues. I don't think even the "rubber" parts on modern engines have a problem with it.
However, E10 does indeed suck because the ethanol is hydrophilic and given some time, it will absorb moisture from the air. This can corrode parts and gum up--a huge problem in engines with carburetors. I don't think this is much of a problem as long as you keep your fuel moving. The good news is that the solution is riding more!
 

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I'm with @Bobber101 I do much the same, the R9T won't have a problem, but even it gets premium where I can get it.

In less rural areas in Jockland, it's regular or walk!

I've got a couple of older Guzzis, one is a carb bike, the fuel lines don't like it, but as they go bad I've replaced them with more modern tolerant hose. So far nothing has gummed up in the carbs.

Main issue I had, was my (now gone) Ducati, had a plastic tank and started to swell to the point that the steering damper was rubbing the ignition switch guard. If that got much worse it could become an MOT issue. Then what do you do?

Tanks ain't cheap, alloy costs a fortune (if you can get one) and I'm not in love with the idea of CF tank but it could be the only option for some folks.

I just try to make sure that premium goes in after a run and the bikes are stored brimmed with premium and a stabilizer or the tanks drained.

At least in the US you have the option, in Europe, about the only thing you could do is remove the Ethanol and then add an Octane booster, which might/might not work
 

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Pretty unlikely given that all the vehicles I own are approved for E10. Maybe you should try and fill up before you run out in future.
I think you might be referring to the corrosion that is caused by ethanol and older vehicles many with carbs. I am referring to the ethanol buildup that happens in all ethanol fuels regardless of the vehicle.

If you pour any ethanol gas into a glass or clear container and watch what happens after one day one week one month you will see how much of the deposits occur and how quickly happens. And no matter how much you shake the fuel it never goes back to looking new.

Do your own research make your own decisions.
 

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For those in the US that do not have access to ethanol-free pump fuel, has anybody considered ordering one of these ethanol free gas barrels?
If price per gallon isn’t a concern… could this be a solution for us OCD riders???

 

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BMW R nineT Urban G/S - Edition 40 years GS
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Just noticed this on the petrol (gas) tank filler cap - Euro 5 model. [Bike lives under a dust cover]

Motor vehicle Plant Automotive design Steering wheel Automotive lighting
 

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First off, hi to everyone. Ethanol requires a lot of ignition advance to run well to not cause over heating. I went over to ethanol in my Brumby and it ran very hot, started giving it advance to see where the ignition tipping point was and it just loved it. Went miles past where high octane position is and test ran it, did the job beautifully. So if you run ethanol the engine must have a management system to identify the fuel and adjust the advance to suit, or you will end up running hot.
 

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First off, hi to everyone. Ethanol requires a lot of ignition advance to run well to not cause over heating. I went over to ethanol in my Brumby and it ran very hot, started giving it advance to see where the ignition tipping point was and it just loved it. Went miles past where high octane position is and test ran it, did the job beautifully. So if you run ethanol the engine must have a management system to identify the fuel and adjust the advance to suit, or you will end up running hot.
Good question. On my snowmobile there are some wires you need switch to get max performance for running on ethanol or non-ethenol. I have not heard of this for out 9T or other motorcycles. Maybe the ecu or fuel management system is smart enough?
 

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We really need a BMW ECU tech to chime in, to understand what the base map is set to run on. If it is tuned for E10 then a high octane is your enemy??
 
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