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Just did 500k's today, compulsory run to get up first service k's. My servo had super ethanol 93 octane with 10%. Ran fine and will continue to try it out, my biggest low speed improvement is to turn off the ABS. It wont leave the back brake alone.
 

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It is a known fact that the combustion of E10 fuel delivers less energy and that this type of fuel causes issues with the engine components it comes in contact with.

Benefits?
A perceived reduction of greenhouse gases that does not take into account the farming of crop land that perhaps could be used to grow food.

Stored over the winter, E10 fuelled engines are harder to start in the summer.
 

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It is a known fact that the combustion of E10 fuel delivers less energy and that this type of fuel causes issues with the engine components it comes in contact with.

Benefits?
A perceived reduction of greenhouse gases that does not take into account the farming of crop land that perhaps could be used to grow food.

Stored over the winter, E10 fuelled engines are harder to start in the summer.
Personally I don't like leaving any of my vehicles sitting in storage for lengthy periods unused - whether they are petrol or diesel fuelled. Inevitably other problems (issues) appear after sitting static for months on end. For example - bearings and seals don't like lubricants draining away, fuel tanks and systems prefer the flow of fresh fuels and brake systems don't improve with sitting static for months on end. As for E10 fuel - the jury is out as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Personally I don't like leaving any of my vehicles sitting in storage for lengthy periods unused - whether they are petrol or diesel fuelled. Inevitably other problems (issues) appear after sitting static for months on end. For example - bearings and seals don't like lubricants draining away, fuel tanks and systems prefer the flow of fresh fuels and brake systems don't improve with sitting static for months on end. As for E10 fuel - the jury is out as far as I'm concerned.
Agreed and I wish that the storage never happened. However over here, the weather does not cooperate and as a majority, bikes are put away for 4 - 6 months of the year.
 

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I hear what you are saying about storage, but running and general performance is the question. When you come to storage time simply run your last tank or two on regular what ever and put her to bed. The 94 octane wit 10 seems to be running cooler(less bluing of the headers) on a 21. Just for giggles I'm running in rain mode, the theory is the performance isn't affected greatly just the ABS nanny is allot quieter and less of a problem.
 

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re: The 94 octane wit 10 seems to be running cooler(less bluing of the headers)

Bears out the fact that there is less energy generated by combustion of the E10.
(less heat= less energy).

On that note, I am not saying that the bike will perform differently on a seat-of-the-pants assessment, with E10.
It is just that my experience is that E10 is not as "friendly" as regular (which is not "regular" as most gasoline here is E10 laced!) to small engines.

That E10's thermal efficiency is less, is a scientific fact.
 

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Umm, there are a few reasoning's to bluing the heat can come from too lean of mixture, overburn of unspent fuel and ignition timing is not correct for said octane. Atmospheric pressure and altitude play a significant role in the outcome as well. I'll bet a nut everyone will get different results, we just need to know what to look out for. This is similar to the people who recon shaft drive loses too much power, my reply is it's only a problem if you are hitting the throttle stop in every gear.🙃
 

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Umm, there are a few reasoning's to bluing the heat can come from too lean of mixture, overburn of unspent fuel and ignition timing is not correct for said octane. Atmospheric pressure and altitude play a significant role in the outcome as well. I'll bet a nut everyone will get different results, we just need to know what to look out for. This is similar to the people who recon shaft drive loses too much power, my reply is it's only a problem if you are hitting the throttle stop in every gear.
Agreed, so many reasons and each of them are valid
 

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On the one hand I'm a great supporter of innovation and ongoing product evolution linked to environmental and performance benefits. On the other hand I get tired of under-developed products being rushed to market where the benefits are never realised and the related grief is all at the consumers end.

Doubtless we will need a year or so of rea-life use to learn if E10 fuel delivers a shed load of unintended and expensive consequences - or actually makes a positive contribution to environmental concerns.

I can remember another innovative 'wonder' petrol from the 1980's marketed as Formula Shell - It was interesting to note press coverage after some customers started reporting problems with their engines.
 

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This excerpt from MCN, is a bit of a long read and summarizes the effects of E10.

Yamaha and Triumph both said that all models from 1990-on are compatible with E10, while Honda said everything post-1993 is compatible, although carburettor-equipped models could experience poor driveability in cold weather.
BMW said that all their models regardless of the year of manufacture can run on E10 fuel with no adverse effects.
Suzuki models made after 2002 are compatible with E10 and those made after 1992 might be but owners should seek advice.
Ducati said that their Multistrada 620 and 1000 models were not compatible with E10 fuel, with tanks known to expand or leak in markets with ethanol-rich fuel.
And Kawasaki said that models made from 2006-on would be ok on E10 but advised customers not to use the fuel in bikes that weren’t specifically approved.
Piaggio (who own Moto Guzzi and Aprilia) were the least E10-friendly manufacturer in 2012, saying that all motorbikes built before 2011 would not be compatible with the fuel.

The (British) Government has calculated that vehicles using E10 fuel emit approximately 2% less CO2 than those running on E5 (the current UK standard fuel).

There can be unwanted side effects when using fuel with a higher ethanol content, especially for those with older bikes. Ethanol can damage plastic or fibreglass fuel tanks, cause old rubber hoses or inlet manifolds to swell or split and react with zinc, lead and aluminium components, too.
Ethanol is also hygroscopic, meaning that it absorbs moisture from the air around it, and this can cause problems when fuel is left to rest in tanks for long periods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Moto GP fossil free in 2027
MotoGP™: racing towards the fuel of the future | MotoGP™

"Working with MotoGP™ manufacturers, the sport has set new goals for increased sustainability:
By 2024, fuel in all MotoGP™ classes will be of minimum 40% non-fossil origin
By 2027, fuel in all MotoGP™ classes will be of 100% non-fossil origin

MotoGP™ is the platform in which these fuels will continue to be developed and tested, with every premier class manufacturer working with their supplier to develop their own fuel. The development of multiple fuels will ensure that the technology and knowledge will reach consumer motorcycles and fuel pumps on the street. This will create an unrivalled selection of viable, sustainable drop-in fuels developed by some of the most important players in global energy and tested by the highest level of prototype two-wheeled machinery in the world. With no single proprietor, the initiative guarantees unprecedented global impact.
These fuels of the future will be able to be used in a standard internal combustion engine and will either be laboratory-created, using components sourced from a carbon capture scheme, or derived from municipal waste or non-food biomass, thereby achieving significant savings in greenhouse gas emissions relative to fossil-derived petrol. In addition, fuel suppliers will progressively introduce the use of renewable energy in the production of their fuel."

FIM seems really enthusiastic on this, we will see if it will be ethanol or something else. Speedway bikes and drag bikes have been running on methanol for decades so I guess that could be an option, but probably not if the fuel also shall be used on street for average customers. A team of scientists in Umeå, Sweden, has managed to produce 100% fossil free gasoline and diesel made of waste from the forest industry. Technically possible yes, but if it is commericially possible ..?
 

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Moto GP fossil free in 2027
MotoGP™: racing towards the fuel of the future | MotoGP™

"Working with MotoGP™ manufacturers, the sport has set new goals for increased sustainability:
By 2024, fuel in all MotoGP™ classes will be of minimum 40% non-fossil origin
By 2027, fuel in all MotoGP™ classes will be of 100% non-fossil origin

MotoGP™ is the platform in which these fuels will continue to be developed and tested, with every premier class manufacturer working with their supplier to develop their own fuel. The development of multiple fuels will ensure that the technology and knowledge will reach consumer motorcycles and fuel pumps on the street. This will create an unrivalled selection of viable, sustainable drop-in fuels developed by some of the most important players in global energy and tested by the highest level of prototype two-wheeled machinery in the world. With no single proprietor, the initiative guarantees unprecedented global impact.
These fuels of the future will be able to be used in a standard internal combustion engine and will either be laboratory-created, using components sourced from a carbon capture scheme, or derived from municipal waste or non-food biomass, thereby achieving significant savings in greenhouse gas emissions relative to fossil-derived petrol. In addition, fuel suppliers will progressively introduce the use of renewable energy in the production of their fuel."

FIM seems really enthusiastic on this, we will see if it will be ethanol or something else. Speedway bikes and drag bikes have been running on methanol for decades so I guess that could be an option, but probably not if the fuel also shall be used on street for average customers. A team of scientists in Umeå, Sweden, has managed to produce 100% fossil free gasoline and diesel made of waste from the forest industry. Technically possible yes, but if it is commericially possible ..?
That is enlightening to read the direction MotoGP is going. Thanks for that info. The motorsports shop down the road from me has started selling Zero electric motorcycles. That made me wonder if dino-fueled bikes would someday be phased out? When I test drove my nineT the manager followed along on one. The weird thing about them is the silent running. (Sorry I'm not trying to derail this thread from E10, but like it or not electric bikes are coming!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
That is enlightening to read the direction MotoGP is going. Thanks for that info. The motorsports shop down the road from me has started selling Zero electric motorcycles. That made me wonder if dino-fueled bikes would someday be phased out? When I test drove my nineT the manager followed along on one. The weird thing about them is the silent running. (Sorry I'm not trying to derail this thread from E10, but like it or not electric bikes are coming!)
Yes, I think that E-bikes are the future. Electric cars are breaking just now, Tesla 3 was the third best selling car in Europe in october, and the bikes are probably ten years behind. I´m looking forward on this, but I will be happy if we can keep riding our by that time vintage nine t´s.
 
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