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Removed the kit

Installed a Wunderlich engine guard in the winter, but had to remove it during a 3 day trip through Oman this weekend.

We did ride 1950km in up to 45 degrees centigrade, and my engine temp went up to 143celcius - see picture. It has to be said that we rode very fast on that stretch with speeds average 140 - 180km, tops 200km . . . in the other days we rode slower 130 - 150km and the temperature went up to 135 centigrade max. . .

Oil consumption is minimal and my UGS did a over 15.000 in the past 7 months (beside the oil change on 1.000 and 11.000km I added a total of 0.7ltr of engine oil . . . due to the free roads here we ride mostily in higher speeds so it is expected to burn a little oil here and there

will see the dealer next week for an engine check up
 

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Does any one know what the maximum engine temperature of a R Nine T should read on the OEM gauge

a) while cruising at say 120 KM/hour

b) While riding in town with normal traffic, red lights etc...
 

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Is there a light warning when temp gets too high?
Referring to the Rider's Manual
R nine T
Warnings, overview Telitale and warning lights Warning symbols in the Meaning Display

General warning light flashing. Temperature symbol appears on the display Coolant Temperature too high


Section 3 pages 23 and 26
 

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I personally begin getting anxious at 250 (121 C) but continue to ride as usual. If im stuck in traffic at 275 (135 C) I start killing the bike at red lights so as not to idle without air. I've had this conversation with a couple techs and the BMW demo team but never get a solid answer. Mostly hear IDK or don't worry you can't hurt it. There is another thread here that says 300 is the ceiling, I hope to never see that. This is stock without a cooler guard.
 

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I personally begin getting anxious at 250 (121 C) but continue to ride as usual. If im stuck in traffic at 275 (135 C) I start killing the bike at red lights so as not to idle without air. I've had this conversation with a couple techs and the BMW demo team but never get a solid answer. Mostly hear IDK or don't worry you can't hurt it. There is another thread here that says 300 is the ceiling, I hope to never see that. This is stock without a cooler guard.


Ive seen 120c sometimes even while riding in sub 10c temperatures. So 135c would sound a bit suprising as a max temperature...for someone riding in california or arizona...


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I personally begin getting anxious at 250 (121 C) but continue to ride as usual. If im stuck in traffic at 275 (135 C) I start killing the bike at red lights so as not to idle without air. I've had this conversation with a couple techs and the BMW demo team but never get a solid answer. Mostly hear IDK or don't worry you can't hurt it. There is another thread here that says 300 is the ceiling, I hope to never see that. This is stock without a cooler guard.
my bike probably averages 250 fahrenheit here in the Southern California without an oil cooler guard. My Harley would run around 320. I'm not sure if there is a difference in where the temp gauge is though. Either way, on the BMW I start to get nervous around 270
 

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my bike probably averages 250 fahrenheit here in the Southern California without an oil cooler guard. My Harley would run around 320. I'm not sure if there is a difference in where the temp gauge is though. Either way, on the BMW I start to get nervous around 270


I found this:
Older BMW bikes are air/oil cooled, they have a separate oil radiator. BMW bikes made for police departments often have a fan directly at this radiator, because running at standstill or stop & go is quite normal for a police bike.

Watercooed engines are more or less built to run endlessly without any cooling problem, even if the bike is standing still. BMW recommends not to operate one of their air/oil cooled engines for more than 10 minutes in standstill, as they may overheat then. When the engine oil gehts too hot, the oil pressure drops down. Most biles have a warning light for that, so as soon as this light goes on, you have to switch off the engine.


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I think 300F ish is about normal for an air cooled motor. This discussion has been beat to death with Triumph Bonneville owners as well. The answer....? Ignorance is bliss. Don't worry if you can keep moving. Stuck in traffic is a different story.
 

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I guess it's a trade off between protection and efficiency. Anyone noticed how much oil temp increases with an oil cooler guard?
No Olof I had no idea, did you notice a change ? How much and under what conditions ?
I just added that farkle to my bike, it’s not been on there long enough for me to notice. What can you tell me about your experience ?
130227
 

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Blitz, here's my personal experience, in no way authoritative or scientifically based. Others here, more knowledgeable than me, sure can and should chime in and add to the following for a richer picture. Also, I never covered up the R Nine T oil cooler so others may add their findings on that. My experience comes from messing around with factory oil coolers on Guzzi Griso, Ducati SR2, 749 and 996, plus building and racing sportscars.

So, with that disclaimer in mind. the point of messing about with oil coolers and covers is for me not primarily about looks or protecting from damage (I never saw a holed cooler) but to get the operating oil temp as close to ideal as possible, ideal for two purposes: for lubricating and for evacuating moisture (from condensation). Depending on the engine's baseline operating oil temp this goes both ways; either I find that I want to increase air flow through the oil cooler to lower the operating oil temp, or I want to reduce the air flow to increase the operating oil temp. For example, the Griso oil cooler is so effective that oil temp in colder climates (such as in Sweden where I live) often stays so low that moisture fails to evaporate, leading to milky sludge in the sump and valve covers (and is believed to have caused failed tappets in some cases on the 8-valve heads), so the Griso was a question of reducing air flow and increasing operating oil temp. Mosty, however, it's a case of lowering oil temps by means of scoops, changed mounting position or simply splicing in a larger or an additional oil cooler.

So, what then is an acceptable oil temp? It depends on where you measure, and there are different views on this (please chime in here, guys), but if I see operating sump temp regularly below 70 degrees Celcius, or over 110 degrees Celcius, I tend to try to do something about it. The R Nine T is different however, as I understand that the oil temp is measured in the cylinder head rather than the sump, so 100-130 degrees Celcius seems to be the norm. Since my riding these days are more pottering about than full attack, and I only do the occasional track day, I find that my Racer is fine as is (factory spec).

After this somewhat lengthy and perhaps pretentious introduction (sorry for that), going back to your question on oil cooler covers: Each case is if course different. but in my experience even a thin mesh reduces air flow surprisingly much. Perforated sheet metal, as in your picture, I'd guess may reduce air flow through the oil cooler significantly, and as a result increase the engine's operating oil temp noticeably. Depending on your baseline oil temp, adding an oil cooler cover which reduces air flow a lot can subsequently be good or bad- good if your engine normally runs too cold, bad if your engine normally runs on the border of too hot.

So, no easy answers. It comes down to the particularites of your bike, ambient temperature, air moisture and how hard and fast you ride. What oil temps do you see, Blitz, on your bike with the cover, and what oil temps did you see before?
 

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This won't add anything useful, but I have an EVOTECH oil-cooler rad cover/ guard that I bought early-on. It seems plentifully perforated, but I've chosen now not to fit it, as I live and mostly ride in a pretty benign sub-tropic clime, and don't wish to have the oil over-heat. Am I being over-cautious? And what is a sensible upper temp level that might give concern while riding - degrees C of course? When next out - c-v permitting of course - I'll note the temps and report back here.



130235
 

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Blitz, here's my personal experience, in no way authoritative or scientifically based. Others here, more knowledgeable than me, sure can and should chime in and add to the following for a richer picture. Also, I never covered up the R Nine T oil cooler so others may add their findings on that. My experience comes from messing around with factory oil coolers on Guzzi Griso, Ducati SR2, 749 and 996, plus building and racing sportscars.

So, with that disclaimer in mind. the point of messing about with oil coolers and covers is for me not primarily about looks or protecting from damage (I never saw a holed cooler) but to get the operating oil temp as close to ideal as possible, ideal for two purposes: for lubricating and for evacuating moisture (from condensation). Depending on the engine's baseline operating oil temp this goes both ways; either I find that I want to increase air flow through the oil cooler to lower the operating oil temp, or I want to reduce the air flow to increase the operating oil temp. For example, the Griso oil cooler is so effective that oil temp in colder climates (such as in Sweden where I live) often stays so low that moisture fails to evaporate, leading to milky sludge in the sump and valve covers (and is believed to have caused failed tappets in some cases on the 8-valve heads), so the Griso was a question of reducing air flow and increasing operating oil temp. Mosty, however, it's a case of lowering oil temps by means of scoops, changed mounting position or simply splicing in a larger or an additional oil cooler.

So, what then is an acceptable oil temp? It depends on where you measure, and there are different views on this (please chime in here, guys), but if I see operating sump temp regularly below 70 degrees Celcius, or over 110 degrees Celcius, I tend to try to do something about it. The R Nine T is different however, as I understand that the oil temp is measured in the cylinder head rather than the sump, so 100-130 degrees Celcius seems to be the norm. Since my riding these days are more pottering about than full attack, and I only do the occasional track day, I find that my Racer is fine as is (factory spec).

After this somewhat lengthy and perhaps pretentious introduction (sorry for that), going back to your question on oil cooler covers: Each case is if course different. but in my experience even a thin mesh reduces air flow surprisingly much. Perforated sheet metal, as in your picture, I'd guess may reduce air flow through the oil cooler significantly, and as a result increase the engine's operating oil temp noticeably. Depending on your baseline oil temp, adding an oil cooler cover which reduces air flow a lot can subsequently be good or bad- good if your engine normally runs too cold, bad if your engine normally runs on the border of too hot.

So, no easy answers. It comes down to the particularites of your bike, ambient temperature, air moisture and how hard and fast you ride. What oil temps do you see, Blitz, on your bike with the cover, and what oil temps did you see before?
That was amazing Olof, thank you so much for taking the time. I learned a great deal. I had not considered the atmospheric humidity at all. It makes sense it just never crossed my mind. I actually feel the need for a guard in this case does not out weigh the handicap. I don’t off road the bike at all except when touring and camping and even then that’s at 5mph on dirt trails. The odds of me encountering rocks large enough to damage or puncture the core are astronomically low and the highways I travel even less. As a pretty farkle I like it but if it handicaps my girl by making her run hot then screw the glitz. I haven’t had it on there very long, maybe two weeks, not near long enough time to test it. Texas summers get exceptionally hot and I drive in thick traffic and we’re not allowed to split lanes here so the opportunity to over heat is ample. Frankly the decision to add the oil cover came two fold, first I took a small rock at high speed and cracked the glass over the stock headlamp which got me to thinking should I cover the oil cooler, second I bought new horns and decided I could use the screen as a mount for my horns as well as to protect the cooler at the same time, so I went for it. The horn mounts worked out well and I like them. I think what I’ll do is figure a design method of removing in a symmetrical manner at least 50 percent of the material currently blocking the flow and test the temperatures. If satisfactory I’ll let it be and if not remove it all together. I’ve looked for some time now for a temperature gage that’s appropriate but I haven’t been impressed yet. I usually take her temperature with the back of my hand (old school) and I can tell if she needs air or a shut down for a bit of cooling down time. I did find one gage that replaces the oil fill cap that I liked but so much has been said (check the temp threads) about how the temp is inaccurate because as you pointed out it’s a head temperature not a sump temp. I run a high grade fully synthetic motor oil that has a very high operating range and never had any issues. I’ve never seen any indications that condensation was giving me any problems, not surprising here in Texas. So I think the grill modifications are the priority at this point. Again Olof it was so nice you took the time, it’s appreciated deeply. I’ve learned so much about modern motorcycle engines from the kind and bright people on this forum, people like you ... Cheers Mate StayUpOn2
 

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I've actually tested mine. I ride in Saudi and I've got an R9t urban. I wanted to fit a guard because the front mudguard is non existent and the roads here can have stones and debris.

I bought a racetech aluminium guard. Comes with spacers to set it off the cooler. The difference in oil temperature in 30c ambient on my regular run (highway, wadi Twisties, 60 to 75 mph) was around 5C.

I'm not concerned. The cooler is sized to handle desert temperatures.
 

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The coolant radiator on the in line 4 is feckin humongous it is backed up with fan(s). I can see why one would want to fit a guard. I can also see why a manufacturer/dealer would want to apply t`s and c`s and minimise its operating costs when convenient.
I personally would not lose sleep about fitting an oil cooler guard to a lumpy old beemer engine. I would lose sleep if I had paid £60 for one when a similar item from China courtesy of the bay costs £17.. and does the same job stopping projectiles and reducing the airflow. Any road the ambient air temp in Scotland is hardly excessive! I had a wee chuckle to myself regarding the observations of the Griso oil cooler. The one that looks like an industrial American diner toaster and melts the manufacturer fitted plastic guard. It appears to me that all coolers are a design after thought and subjective to a load of variables. The Griso... who on earth would buy one of those.. apart from me?:oops:

Chris.
 

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Buy a Griso: I would and did 😊 If the Griso reappeared in LeMans shape I'd be unable to resist.
As, commented, guards are nothing to loose sleep about. My point was that oil temps MAY be affected and in rare borderline cases that MAY be good or bad, rather than inconsequential. For example, the air cooled Ducati 620/800/1000 range basically had the same engine (bore and stroke differed, plus some other details such as dry/wet clutch). The 800/1000 had an oil cooler, the 620 did not. We had all three models in the family for years (ran through 3x620, 4x800 and 2x1000) but never noticed any major oil temp differences. Neither did we hole any of the oil coolers either.
 
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