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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know or remember what the dealer did at 10,000 miles. I spoke with the maintenance department at my dealership asking about giving the bike a 10K mile work over ... he quoted me a figure just over $1,000.00 USD. Is that good or bad ? Am I going to get 1K’s worth of service and
fluids ? Not sure yet but I’ll probably go through with it. The only thing that probably needs attention that I’ve noticed is the brakes. Rear is beginning to make friction noises when the rear brake is used, front brake lever is getting closer and closer to the grip when I use it but nothing alarming ... yet. Bike is running beautifully, strong and no stalls. I’m learning to get very smooth through the gears up and down and she feel healthy to me. What’s the dealer do at 10grand. I don’t want him to mess up a good thing, I’m happy, she’s happy too. What’s you opinion ? ......Blitz
 

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10,000 km / 6,000 miles or 20,000 km / 12,000 miles ? I see no service interval for 10,000 miles. With the history of dealers you very rarely get what you pay for and quality of any "service" or "repair" is for the most part sub par. Brakes are very easy to do to our bikes. Actually everything is very easy to do to our bikes. Blitz just come on up to Ohio and I'll take care of your baby and it'll only cost ya a few beers and some stories to go with !
Oh and now ya want my personal opinion, ya asked, so here goes.............I wouldn't trust any dealer. They are great for factory parts and free receipts, that about all. Then again I am extremely anal and can't stand how dealers just breeze through "repairs", heck most can't set up a folding chair. I also have had EXTENSIVE dealer knowledge over the years along with a few great friends employed by some, so my opinion is based on many facts.
I just know some nerd is typing to prove me wrong at the perfect dealer they have found, rolling eyes with a great big sigh.................
 

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At any rate here are the intervals.....10,000km you'll be dealing with an oil change and filter, check valves, check and adjust synchro . Which in my person opinion is weak/lacking on service for the bike.
If your talking 20,000km then you'll be the same as 10,000km but also add rear bevel drive oil change, change all spark plugs and replace air filter, again weak/lacking on service for the bike.
I feel BMW stretches their intervals a bit too long and rely on the wiz bang affect of synthetic oils, so do many techs I know.
 

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As he wrote, there isn't a 10,000 mile service scheduled for these bikes.

As to the rest of your questions and comments:
When did it last have service, which service was it (annual, 6,000 miles, etc?), and how old is the bike? Some of what might need done is independent of the mileage.

Have you looked at the rear brake pads?
The only time I've ever heard 'friction noises' is when a pad was worn down to the steel. Not a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting my dealer tech didn’t mention that there was no 10,000 mile check. That’s a red flag I’d say. Blitz (actually my bikes name) is 2015 Classic. Last checkup was at 600 hundred ..I’m 4K overdue for 6K. I’ve changed the oil and filter since then at around 2K and again at 6K, topped up clutch and brake fluids but that’s it. She doesn’t burn any oil, starts on the second turn every single time, never stalls or hesitates.... I love her. Is it common that the brakes should need new pads at just 10,000? I’ll have to admit I ride her hard every time I mount up. For me that’s what she’s for that’s why I bought her. Have fun go fast. So I guess I stop pretty hard too. I’ll look at the brake shoes tomorrow. I’ve never been to Ohio Buggin, nice place. What part ? Cleveland is about 1K, that’s just two “iron-butts” in a row. I might have more questions about adjusting synchros, are we talking about the transmission or throttle bodies? How do you find top dead center to adjust the valves.
Looks like I need to find my Haynes manual and study up. Dealer says he’ll flush the brake lines, is it just fresh fluid that’s used ? I’m sure I’ll have more questions as I take this on. It’s late and my brain is shutting down.... finally. I’ll get back to you both. Thanks for your time. ....Blitz
 

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2018 BMW R nineT
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1000USD for any scheduled service of this bike seems veeeeery excessive, short of the full maintenance schedule done all at the same time in one go, which doesn't seem to be the case. I'd say the most expensive action this bike has in terms of labour is changing the front suspension fluid which is to be done at 30000km. And indeed there's no 10000 mile service.

The fact is that, for most people (me included), the maintenance becomes due not due to miles/km but due to calendar. My bike read 9105km after a ride yesterday and I'll be doing its third oil/filter change next week because it'll be the anniversary of the last time I did it.

Just as an example, next week I'll be doing (using BMW original fluids and parts):

  • Engine oil and filter change, 12 months: 102.68€ in parts/oil
  • Gearbox oil change, 24 months: 69.63€ in parts/oil and I'll have a 300ml oil leftover for next year's rear bevel gearbox oil change which takes 180ml.
  • Brake fluid change, front and back, 24 months: 19.92€ fluid, two bottles of 250ml, possibly will only need one bottle
  • Valve clearance check, 10000km, no parts needed if the clearances are correct
  • Throttle bodies synchro check, no parts needed

I paid 200€ of materials for this. If you need front brake pads, add 90€, rear is 50€.

This is a 3 year/10000km maintenance in a bike that has followed 100% the BMW schedule, first check at the dealer at 1150km, then first year service at the dealer as well with 4000km, second year 6500km by myself.

Some dealers seem to grossly overinflate prices. There's another member here that was charged 1.5L of oil to change the rear bevel gearbox oil which only takes in 180ml. It's enough oil for more than 8 bikes.
 

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Never worked at B.M.W dealership, H.d. Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki etc. They change all filters and fluids, Including Fork oil. Check and adjust all cables, check spokes if applicable and electrical operations. H.D. with rubber mnt. chassis you had to do vehicle alignment and they also have tapered timken wheel brgs. that had to be serviced also multi cylinder machines get carb. or throttle body synch. That's what I am studying now, B.M.W. seems a little complicated procedure. With the idle control motors and the procedure to reset. I don't trust anybody with none of my toys or automobiles. The dealers these days are all about the money, They have certified techs. training all the rookies. When they think the trainee has enough knowledge they send the experienced tech down the road and work the rookie for half pay. I seen this happen many times in my forty plus years as a mechanic. No you can't borrow my tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the time it took and the wisdom you gathered gentlemen. I have an honor guard to ride in this afternoon but this weekend I’m jumping in with both feet beginning with a Saturday trip to the dealership for all parts and materials. So far I can’t put my hands on my darn manual so I’m sure I’ll be back with questions ...don’t go far ......Blitz
 

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2018 BMW R nineT
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BTW, I have already created the checklist and the job cards for all the tasks I'm going to do (this is my aviation background kicking in).

I note down all measurements and S/N of the torque wrenches I use, sign off each job card, stamp it and then file the work pack in my bike's folder. I do the same for my cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
BTW, I have already created the checklist and the job cards for all the tasks I'm going to do (this is my aviation background kicking in).

I note down all measurements and S/N of the torque wrenches I use, sign off each job card, stamp it and then file the work pack in my bike's folder. I do the same for my cars.
Damn, I like you and we haven’t even met 👍. In the American Navy they call it PMS !
Planned Maintenance Service or System, I don’t remember which. I had long forgotten about that method of insuring you take care of your equipment. Very effective for minor morons like myself, I get distracted easily ADD. We literally had an index card (3X5) for every single day of the year. That’s brilliant. I’m on it ! I’ll stop by OfficeSupply this afternoon and build a nice wooden box tonight. Thanks for the kick start IaaIves ..... BeWell&GoFast ! ✌😎 .....StayUpOn2 Mate .....
 
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Discussion Starter #12
As he wrote, there isn't a 10,000 mile service scheduled for these bikes.

As to the rest of your questions and comments:
When did it last have service, which service was it (annual, 6,000 miles, etc?), and how old is the bike? Some of what might need done is independent of the mileage.

Have you looked at the rear brake pads?
The only time I've ever heard 'friction noises' is when a pad was worn down to the steel. Not a good thing.
Well Gristle, you were correct damnit! The back side of the disk is scared, it’s metal to metal. I’m rolling up my sleeves and getting ready to do it ALL. Tune up, brakes filters and fluids. Standby for questions.
 

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BTW, I have already created the checklist and the job cards for all the tasks I'm going to do (this is my aviation background kicking in).

I note down all measurements and S/N of the torque wrenches I use, sign off each job card, stamp it and then file the work pack in my bike's folder. I do the same for my cars.
Brilliant!
 

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BTW, I have already created the checklist and the job cards for all the tasks I'm going to do (this is my aviation background kicking in).

I note down all measurements and S/N of the torque wrenches I use, sign off each job card, stamp it and then file the work pack in my bike's folder. I do the same for my cars.
Man, that’s just fantastic! Maybe you or @Manyakus should turn this into a product. Even a monkey could do the service with this elaborate info (which makes you wonder why at some BMW dealerships stupid shit still happens, right?) Great work, @laalves !
 

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Love that checklist and manual, @laalves ! (y)

@BlitzSchnell -- My bike is still fairly new, but I've wondered about brake pads, so I did some research on the forum, and what I've found is the rear pads on some (or most) R9T's wear unusually fast. Also, many people seem to prefer organic pads for the rear brake, rather than sintered pads. If you have the dealer perform the service, see what they advise. When I do mine I'll probably go with EBC FA363 pads. I'm pretty sure that's the right part number anyway.

I'm a decent but not great wrench, and I never have all the tools I'd need for some jobs. I'm content to pay the dealer shop for some things, but easy stuff I'll try to do it myself. We'll see how it goes with my R9T Pure as the miles add up. There's a certain satisfaction in DIY, but in my opinion there is no shame in having a good dealer shop work on one's motorcycle. Good luck with whichever way you go on your service, buddy!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Man, that’s just fantastic! Maybe you or @Manyakus should turn this into a product. Even a monkey could do the service with this elaborate info (which makes you wonder why at some BMW dealerships stupid shit still happens, right?) Great work, @laalves !
I’d buy into that if it were legit. Picture it ... a calendar with the schedule, a manual with instructions and companion videos on YouTube with step by step instructions where you can watch exactly what you’re about to do. Yep ... I’d buy into that. Great idea Norbi..
Great idea Iaalves.. run with it and I’ll do the Q testing and help refine the final product.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey Blitz just out of curiosity how many miles did you get from this set of rear pads? Were they the originals? Just curious.
Yes they were originals Rick and if I consider that I took them a bit to far I’d say that before they began to scar the disk .... maybe 9,000. I think I could have saved the cost of a new rear disk if I’d replaced them at 9K. It’s a big machine at 500lbs and I ride quick which means I stop hard too... I should have been paying attention. First really modern motorcycle I’ve owned. I usually buy a bike, work on it and ride it into the ground and this bike is amazing, I haven’t touched it, no tuning, no chain, no points or plugs (almost) it lulled me into complacency and the brakes were the first to go. It’s a good lesson for me... Could have been worse $$$. I’m going to pull the rear wheel while I’m at it and fabricate the rear wheel hub cap I’ve been thinking about. I’ll post Picts. ......Blitz
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Love that checklist and manual, @laalves ! (y)

@BlitzSchnell -- My bike is still fairly new, but I've wondered about brake pads, so I did some research on the forum, and what I've found is the rear pads on some (or most) R9T's wear unusually fast. Also, many people seem to prefer organic pads for the rear brake, rather than sintered pads. If you have the dealer perform the service, see what they advise. When I do mine I'll probably go with EBC FA363 pads. I'm pretty sure that's the right part number anyway.

I'm a decent but not great wrench, and I never have all the tools I'd need for some jobs. I'm content to pay the dealer shop for some things, but easy stuff I'll try to do it myself. We'll see how it goes with my R9T Pure as the miles add up. There's a certain satisfaction in DIY, but in my opinion there is no shame in having a good dealer shop work on one's motorcycle. Good luck with whichever way you go on your service, buddy!
Thanks Tim, I think it will be a combination of DIY and dealership but it won’t be for 1K.
I’ll do the shoes and disk but I’ll let the dealership flush the brakes and do the fluids. I’ll do the filters and crankcase oil but leave the final drive to the service techs etc.... I’ll do it just for the fun and joy of it but stay out of trouble with the rear end and valves. I want to get my hands dirty but not get in over my head. I’ll start a thread and photo doc the whole thing. Look for it. ......Blitz
 
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