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2014 BMW R NineT (Classic)
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Finally my repaired knee improved enough for me to get into the garage and start some meaningful DIY. Last week wiring harness repair and this week (now my knee bends a little more) I've moved to the bottom of the bike and (with a little struggling, assorted bad words, some single malt and some perseverance) the deed was done. As I seem to have gotten into the habit of taking loads of photos when working on my bike (sometimes useful if you forget where something goes when reassembling) I have enough snaps to do a BaldyDave DIY.....

Now the instructions that come with the Wunderlich kit are pretty good and please bear in mind I'm a very amateur home mechanic, so rely on Wunderlich's instructions more than mine if in any doubt. This is simply how I bolted the stuff onto my bike! In other words, use these instructions at your own risk.... ;)

Anyhow here's the tools I used to get the job done:

1. T40 torx bit (footpeg bracket bolts)

2. T45 torx bit (Wunderlich bracket countersunk bolts)

3. 10mm ring spanner (Wunderlich side stand bump-stop)

4. Cable tie

5. I'm assuming you have a socket set and torque wrench that you can attach the torx bits to...


Like Wunderlich suggested I started with the gear lever side. First of all I used a looped cable tie to hold the foot peg in the folded position which makes getting to the bolts easier. Then use a T40 torx bit to remove the two foot peg bracket bolts taking care to catch the bracket as the second bolt comes undone.




Install the Wunderlich lowering bracket. Use a T45 socket and a trusty torque wrench to torque to the advised figure. As soon as I have decided if I like what the lowering kit does I will refit the screws with some thread lock, though you might want to do this straight away (or not at all as Wunderlich don't mention this - your choice).





Next I chose to remove the stock rubber bump stop and replace it with the wunderlich item, which is thicker rubber plus the threaded "stud" assembly combines to stop the side stand hitting off the bottom of the lowered footrest bracket. Here is the stock bump-stop.




The stock bump-stop just pulls off...




And this is the wunderlich replacement stuff:




You will need your 10mm spanner for this bit. Firstly assemble the bump stop, the first standard 10mm nut goes on, followed by a washer. Then put the threaded stud through the hole where the stock bump stop was. Now put the remaining washer over the threaded stud followed by the nylock nut.





Tighten the nut lightly and check that when you lightly mount the stock foot peg assembly (I just finger tightened) that the side stand does not hit the foot peg bracket. If any adjustment is needed to the bump stop, do so by moving with the two nuts on the Wunderlich part. Once you are happy, tighten the bump stop nylock nut. I found that with the first nut wound right down onto the back of the rubber part that the adjustment was fine, and no further adjustment was necessary. You may find different.

Now we need to install thread lock (if desired) and then using a T40 torx bit and torque wrench, tighten the bolts to the recommended setting. Wunderlich supply shiny new bolts for this. Again I'm waiting till I'm happy with the kit before fitting the Wunderlich bolts and thread lock, and have just reused the stock bolts for now. You can just do the new install if you are more care-free than me! lol

That's the lowered foot peg installed! It is very likely that you will have to adjust the gear lever position. I can't do this right now as I can't sit on my bike properly yet, but it is just a matter of moving the lever on the splined shaft. I will update this later...


Onto the brake side foot peg! This is slightly more awkward due to the hydraulic brake lines and reservoir lines having little slack in them.

Again the same procedure with tying up the foot peg with the cable tie (re use the one from the other side, should be fine for fit). This is not strictly necessary but I found it made working on the bike easier.

I'm not going to show a load of photos here as it's the same procedure as for the gear shift side.

Tie the peg up.

Unbolt the two stock foot peg bracket bolts (T40 bit).

Install the Wunderlich lowering bracket (T45 countersunk bolts). Apply thread lock (if desired) and torque bolts to required setting.



Now the next bit might differ from install to install. As others on here and Wunderlich state, they found that there is JUST enough slack for the stock hydraulic lines to stretch to the new lower position, but Wunderlich do supply a brake line extender if you need more slack. I found that mine were a tight fit, but OK. If you do need the hydraulic line extender, please use caution as you will certainly lose brake fluid (corrosive to paintwork) and the hydraulic system will need bled afterwards. If in doubt trust this job to someone properly qualified. Not worth the risk of tampering with the brakes if you are not confident in your abilities.

Anyway I just got away with using the stock hydraulic lines but had to detach the reservoir tubes from the holder in the rear passenger subframe to give the length needed. No big deal as nothing looks as if it will rub and I might be taking the subframe off anyway.

The stock foot peg bracket was bolted onto the Wunderlich bracket using the stock bolts (T40 torx) for now minus thread lock (reason previously mentioned).


That's just about it I think! Stand back and admire your handiwork!




Install time 90 minutes including one coffee, one whisky break (pain killer lol) plus swearing time! Not bad for a guy with a knackered leg! lol

NB this is work in progress, will update with gear lever adjustment at a later time, plus correct any mistakes.

Open to constructive criticism if anyone can find ways of improving this post. :)
 

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you did a good job...I felt an improvement in the seating/leg position after I did the same install on my NineT...unfortunately it wasn't enough, so I sold the NineT and bought a scrambler.....now I have that wonderful drivetrain in a more comfortable ( to me at least) package.
 

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Finally my repaired knee improved enough for me to get into the garage and start some meaningful DIY. Last week wiring harness repair and this week (now my knee bends a little more) I've moved to the bottom of the bike and (with a little struggling, assorted bad words, some single malt and some perseverance) the deed was done. As I seem to have gotten into the habit of taking loads of photos when working on my bike (sometimes useful if you forget where something goes when reassembling) I have enough snaps to do a BaldyDave DIY.....

Now the instructions that come with the Wunderlich kit are pretty good and please bear in mind I'm a very amateur home mechanic, so rely on Wunderlich's instructions more than mine if in any doubt. This is simply how I bolted the stuff onto my bike! In other words, use these instructions at your own risk.... ;)

Anyhow here's the tools I used to get the job done:

1. T40 torx bit (footpeg bracket bolts)

2. T45 torx bit (Wunderlich bracket countersunk bolts)

3. 10mm ring spanner (Wunderlich side stand bump-stop)

4. Cable tie

5. I'm assuming you have a socket set and torque wrench that you can attach the torx bits to...


Like Wunderlich suggested I started with the gear lever side. First of all I used a looped cable tie to hold the foot peg in the folded position which makes getting to the bolts easier. Then use a T40 torx bit to remove the two foot peg bracket bolts taking care to catch the bracket as the second bolt comes undone.




Install the Wunderlich lowering bracket. Use a T45 socket and a trusty torque wrench to torque to the advised figure. As soon as I have decided if I like what the lowering kit does I will refit the screws with some thread lock, though you might want to do this straight away (or not at all as Wunderlich don't mention this - your choice).





Next I chose to remove the stock rubber bump stop and replace it with the wunderlich item, which is thicker rubber plus the threaded "stud" assembly combines to stop the side stand hitting off the bottom of the lowered footrest bracket. Here is the stock bump-stop.




The stock bump-stop just pulls off...




And this is the wunderlich replacement stuff:




You will need your 10mm spanner for this bit. Firstly assemble the bump stop, the first standard 10mm nut goes on, followed by a washer. Then put the threaded stud through the hole where the stock bump stop was. Now put the remaining washer over the threaded stud followed by the nylock nut.





Tighten the nut lightly and check that when you lightly mount the stock foot peg assembly (I just finger tightened) that the side stand does not hit the foot peg bracket. If any adjustment is needed to the bump stop, do so by moving with the two nuts on the Wunderlich part. Once you are happy, tighten the bump stop nylock nut. I found that with the first nut wound right down onto the back of the rubber part that the adjustment was fine, and no further adjustment was necessary. You may find different.

Now we need to install thread lock (if desired) and then using a T40 torx bit and torque wrench, tighten the bolts to the recommended setting. Wunderlich supply shiny new bolts for this. Again I'm waiting till I'm happy with the kit before fitting the Wunderlich bolts and thread lock, and have just reused the stock bolts for now. You can just do the new install if you are more care-free than me! lol

That's the lowered foot peg installed! It is very likely that you will have to adjust the gear lever position. I can't do this right now as I can't sit on my bike properly yet, but it is just a matter of moving the lever on the splined shaft. I will update this later...


Onto the brake side foot peg! This is slightly more awkward due to the hydraulic brake lines and reservoir lines having little slack in them.

Again the same procedure with tying up the foot peg with the cable tie (re use the one from the other side, should be fine for fit). This is not strictly necessary but I found it made working on the bike easier.

I'm not going to show a load of photos here as it's the same procedure as for the gear shift side.

Tie the peg up.

Unbolt the two stock foot peg bracket bolts (T40 bit).

Install the Wunderlich lowering bracket (T45 countersunk bolts). Apply thread lock (if desired) and torque bolts to required setting.



Now the next bit might differ from install to install. As others on here and Wunderlich state, they found that there is JUST enough slack for the stock hydraulic lines to stretch to the new lower position, but Wunderlich do supply a brake line extender if you need more slack. I found that mine were a tight fit, but OK. If you do need the hydraulic line extender, please use caution as you will certainly lose brake fluid (corrosive to paintwork) and the hydraulic system will need bled afterwards. If in doubt trust this job to someone properly qualified. Not worth the risk of tampering with the brakes if you are not confident in your abilities.

Anyway I just got away with using the stock hydraulic lines but had to detach the reservoir tubes from the holder in the rear passenger subframe to give the length needed. No big deal as nothing looks as if it will rub and I might be taking the subframe off anyway.

The stock foot peg bracket was bolted onto the Wunderlich bracket using the stock bolts (T40 torx) for now minus thread lock (reason previously mentioned).


That's just about it I think! Stand back and admire your handiwork!




Install time 90 minutes including one coffee, one whisky break (pain killer lol) plus swearing time! Not bad for a guy with a knackered leg! lol

NB this is work in progress, will update with gear lever adjustment at a later time, plus correct any mistakes.

Open to constructive criticism if anyone can find ways of improving this post. :)


Was super easy wasn't it. I reckon 90 minutes could be lowered to about 9 minutes without bum knee and single malt involved.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Thank you BD, nice and clear instructions for the unfortunate less mechanics among us (me included).
Will be ordering this soon to put on the scrambler as even with my 6'3" the riding position is not yet optimal.
 

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2014 BMW R NineT (Classic)
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Discussion Starter #9
I'm 5ft11 tall with a 32inch inside leg. Haven't riden the bike yet so can't comment on my perception of the change. Check out other threads for what folk think of the lowering kit. This is mainly a DIY thread not a discussion of the merits or otherwise. No offence intended :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Was super easy wasn't it. I reckon 90 minutes could be lowered to about 9 minutes without bum knee and single malt involved.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Haha I reckon that could have possibly halfed the time if I cut out the 20 minute coffee and whisky break, plus not having to ease myself down to lying horizontally next to the bike to do the really low bolts, and then struggle upright again! Must have looked hilarious, glad no one was there! I was covered in workshop grime from head to foot so my jacket and jeans went straight into the washing machine. Just as well I had the sense to wear old clothes!

Yeah the install is straightforward - as long as the brake hose stretches! If not then it is a far more involved operation. I tend to take my time when doing a job for the first time but more enthusiastic or experienced mechanics could probably do the basic job in 20mins. :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I'm 5ft11 tall with a 32inch inside leg. Haven't riden the bike yet so can't comment on my perception of the change. Check out other threads for what folk think of the lowering kit. This is mainly a DIY thread not a discussion of the merits or otherwise. No offence intended :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No problem, no offence taken. I followed to this post from the Active Topic button and did not notice the thread origin.
 

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Haha I reckon that could have possibly halfed the time if I cut out the 20 minute coffee and whisky break, plus not having to ease myself down to lying horizontally next to the bike to do the really low bolts, and then struggle upright again! Must have looked hilarious, glad no one was there! I was covered in workshop grime from head to foot so my jacket and jeans went straight into the washing machine. Just as well I had the sense to wear old clothes!

Yeah the install is straightforward - as long as the brake hose stretches! If not then it is a far more involved operation. I tend to take my time when doing a job for the first time but more enthusiastic or experienced mechanics could probably do the basic job in 20mins. :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reminds me somehow the chicken with whiskey recipe.

https://ioannablogs.com/2013/09/09/chicken-with-whiskey-recipe/
 

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Discussion Starter #13
haha brilliant!!! :funnypost::10::D

Now lets get back on topic, folks! ;)
 

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Terrific write up, as always, Dave. I went a different route. Bought set of Suburban Machine pegs. They use the stock hangers, so easy install and no brake line issues, lower the footing 30mm and best of all, you can bin the silly OEM baby buggy bumper things. The SM pegs are also adjustable for angle with a small set screw and cost about $25 (US) less.

See below

Joel
 

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That was easy - nice ~
I have the control lowering kit - have had to make modifications & adjustments when fitting aftermarket headers.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That was easy - nice ~
I have the control lowering kit - have had to make modifications & adjustments when fitting aftermarket headers.
Really? I have aftermarket Black Widow headers and no adjustments were necessary. What headers do you have and what did you have to do? Would be useful for other members with the same headers as you.
 

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How have people found riding with the lowered pegs? Was thinking of fitting some to my Racer, but scrape the pegs or my boots coming out of every roundabout as it is so think may not be a good idea!
 

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How have people found riding with the lowered pegs? Was thinking of fitting some to my Racer, but scrape the pegs or my boots coming out of every roundabout as it is so think may not be a good idea!


I like the lowered peg height, but I do have an issue. Not sure with the big rubber oem peg and feeler nipple, but with Rizoma Street pegs unfortunately it is the foot controls that scrape first now. Not a fun feeling.


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Really? I have aftermarket Black Widow headers and no adjustments were necessary. What headers do you have and what did you have to do? Would be useful for other members with the same headers as you.
I use Mass (two individual pipes, left & right, with a balancing tube)


The Wunderlich lowering kit moves the peg bolt-on positions, the Mass appears to be tailored for the stock peg positions - not rocket science but it requires some fiddling vs a bolt-on fit.
 
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