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I've been on boxers for almost ten years now. I've known dozens of riders who've had theirs coated and have seen testimonials and pictures from hundreds of other riders over the years online. My first R1200R (Hexhead) was Cermakromed and with the exception of some dulling (more like the first 4-6 inches) the coating held up brilliantly for over 20k miles and my shop assured me I could polish it back to like new if I was so inclined. I've never seen or heard anything to the contrary from other riders using their motorcycles under normal conditions.
Perhaps you're better versed on the subject than myself. Admittedly, I only have 15+ years of hands on experience with ceramic coatings and thermal barriers on motorsport applications ranging from 5HP mini bikes to 5000HP twin turbo shoot out cars.

As I previously stated, survival of the coating is contingent on the maximum realized temperature. Some bikes will be fine others will fail rather quickly. Restrictive exhaust and CAT's can negatively affect this as well. Further, most people don't get pipes back that look like a "bright chrome" as they should, so when the pipe dulls they don't notice as much of a difference in that it was never shiny to begin with. They don't notice a problem until they start to see little rust blisters or de-lamination. Although, you can polish the pipes "sometimes". The mere fact that they are dulling so bad indicates that the aluminum skin, "the weakest link" is oxidizing and potentially going into a sacrificial mode due to accelerated temperatures. So initially you may be able to get some shine back in it if you didn't over heat it too much. Eventually it will not be able to be polished. Also, recognize that the aluminum skin is only a few thousandths thick so you can't go crazy with it.

Another example of "exposed temps" is below. I would NEVER advocate anyone using a bright ceramic coating for a turbo or supercharged application in an automotive or motorcycle application. That being said, some limited race use cars and race or street driven bikes can get by for some time especially if they are lower boost applications. The twin turbo Busa below would normally be a "NO" candidate for bright, but since the bike has minimal bodywork and lower boost, similar applications have previously survived.



 

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Perhaps you're better versed on the subject than myself. Admittedly, I only have 15+ years of hands on experience with ceramic coatings and thermal barriers on motorsport applications ranging from 5HP mini bikes to 5000HP twin turbo shoot out cars.

As I previously stated, survival of the coating is contingent on the maximum realized temperature. Some bikes will be fine others will fail rather quickly. Restrictive exhaust and CAT's can negatively affect this as well. Further, most people don't get pipes back that look like a "bright chrome" as they should, so when the pipe dulls they don't notice as much of a difference in that it was never shiny to begin with. They don't notice a problem until they start to see little rust blisters or de-lamination. Although, you can polish the pipes "sometimes". The mere fact that they are dulling so bad indicates that the aluminum skin, "the weakest link" is oxidizing and potentially going into a sacrificial mode due to accelerated temperatures. So initially you may be able to get some shine back in it if you didn't over heat it too much. Eventually it will not be able to be polished. Also, recognize that the aluminum skin is only a few thousandths thick so you can't go crazy with it.

Another example of "exposed temps" is below. I would NEVER advocate anyone using a bright ceramic coating for a turbo or supercharged application in an automotive or motorcycle application. That being said, some limited race use cars and race or street driven bikes can get by for some time especially if they are lower boost applications. The twin turbo Busa below would normally be a "NO" candidate for bright, but since the bike has minimal bodywork and lower boost, similar applications have previously survived.
Good for you bud. Do you have any pics of your R9T?
 

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I'm enjoying this thread... I didn't know that much about ceramic coatings before but I'm learning now! Entertainment plus education is a good mix!

Let's make sure we keep things pleasant though folks... A friendly debate is good, but let's not cross any lines.... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I didn't mean to start such a good thread, but glad I did! Thanks for all of the great answers and insight. I am doing it for looks alone. Think black pipes will look great, especially with an orange bike I'll have soon. Dropping the pipes off on Saturday for coating, and am having the valve heads powder coated gloss black.
 

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Hey guys. I'm going with a Competition Werkes GP slip on for my 9T classic. Had one previously on a Ducati Diavel and loved it. I want to continue 'blackening' my bike so will go with the velvet black slip on. This motivates me to blacken the headers at the same time. After some research, most opinions favor ceramic coating over paint or wraps. Has anyone had experience working with Jet-Hot or their products? Any recommendations or alternatives? Any considerations based on your experience?
 

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@emodog I have merged your post with this existing thread on that exact same topic.
Have a read back through the earlier posts above for further information.
Also have a read of this earlier thread: Ceramic coating
 

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Perhaps you're better versed on the subject than myself. Admittedly, I only have 15+ years of hands on experience with ceramic coatings and thermal barriers on motorsport applications ranging from 5HP mini bikes to 5000HP twin turbo shoot out cars.

As I previously stated, survival of the coating is contingent on the maximum realized temperature. Some bikes will be fine others will fail rather quickly. Restrictive exhaust and CAT's can negatively affect this as well. Further, most people don't get pipes back that look like a "bright chrome" as they should, so when the pipe dulls they don't notice as much of a difference in that it was never shiny to begin with. They don't notice a problem until they start to see little rust blisters or de-lamination. Although, you can polish the pipes "sometimes". The mere fact that they are dulling so bad indicates that the aluminum skin, "the weakest link" is oxidizing and potentially going into a sacrificial mode due to accelerated temperatures. So initially you may be able to get some shine back in it if you didn't over heat it too much. Eventually it will not be able to be polished. Also, recognize that the aluminum skin is only a few thousandths thick so you can't go crazy with it.

Another example of "exposed temps" is below. I would NEVER advocate anyone using a bright ceramic coating for a turbo or supercharged application in an automotive or motorcycle application. That being said, some limited race use cars and race or street driven bikes can get by for some time especially if they are lower boost applications. The twin turbo Busa below would normally be a "NO" candidate for bright, but since the bike has minimal bodywork and lower boost, similar applications have previously survived.




It's refreshing to see an honest assessment of the limitations of Ceramic coatings, thank you.

It's often marketed as a bullet proof permanent solution that will never change, obviously this is not the case.
My personal experience of Ceramic coatings on my 2007 track bike looks like this.

1st pic is the ceramic coated exhaust after a LOT of hard track use, the pipes are Arrow brand and made of "Inconel", Inconel is an alloy that was used in WSS racing as Titanuim was banned for cost reasons. Ironically, inconel is supposedly more expensive.... it's very thin wall alloy so it's no surprise that they look like this after years of hard use.
127517



impossible to say if they were coated inside and out, This is after i spent hours cleaning them in an effort to make them respectable again. on the wifes kitchen bench, oh dear!
127518
127519



And this is them after the old ceramic was removed and they had been recoated inside and out....
127520
127521


127523


Looks great now but i don't expect the brightness to last when you consider the tubing is incredibly light and thin and it will be flogged mercilessly round race tracks. (It's a TenKate WSS CBR600RR that was used in the local SS series)
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Can any material be ceramic coated ?

BTW: Does anybody know from what material the Akrapovic link pipe for high support is made of ?
 

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My headers are at Jet Hot getting coated. I'll update the thread with pictures of the new exhaust system when it's installed and ready to roar.
 
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